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CIUS Endowment Funds

With deep appreciation for the generosity and commitment of our benefactors, hundreds of students and scholars in all parts of the world working in many disciplines of Ukrainian studies have benefited from the annual grants, scholarships, and fellowships awarded by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. These awards were made possible by donations from individuals and organizations that place a high value on education and have deep respect for their Ukrainian heritage. Endowments are crucial to the support of CIUS activities. We thank all our donors for their generosity and trust in CIUS to make their dreams and wishes a reality. Through named endowment funds they will be remembered by future generations for their support and dedication.

 

While only accrued interest is used to fund designated activities, direct donations to the spending allocation to support specific projects are also encouraged. The names of all donors are acknowledged in the CIUS Newsletter (both print and electronic editions). You may also pay tribute to the memory of a friend, associate, or loved one who has passed away by making a donation to CIUS. The names of those being commemorated are published in the CIUS Newsletter, and their families can be notified at the donor's request.

 

If you would like to make a contribution, donate in someone's memory, or establish an endowment at CIUS, please contact Mykola Soroka, CIUS Development Manager, at msoroka@ualberta.ca, phone: (780) 492-6847. You can also to the find out more about the University of Alberta policy on giving or make a gift online at:

http://www.giving.ualberta.ca.

 

Following is a brief description of each endowment fund and a glimpse into the lives of its founders. Listed in order of establishment, amounts include all donations received by 31 July 2011.


Krysa Family Scholarship Endowment Fund: $32,682

The first endowment fund at CIUS was established by the Leo J. Krysa Family Foundation in December 1981. Mr. Krysa was the founder and president of the Krysa Construction Machinery Co. Ltd., a national firm with headquarters in Edmonton. The fund provides at least one undergraduate scholarship annually to a student in the Faculty of Arts or Education at the University of Alberta whose program emphasizes Ukrainian and/or Ukrainian-Canadian studies. As of the 2010–11 academic year, 28 undergraduates have been awarded the Leo J. Krysa Scholarship.

Krysa Undergraduate Scholarship Application


CIUS Endowment Fund: $813,741

This fund was established in September 1986 with bequests from the estates of George Deba (Vancouver) and Katherine Miskew (Edmonton). Their contributions of $30,000 and $2,000, respectively, were matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta, creating an endowment of $96,000. Mr. Deba was born in the village of Havrylivka in Bukovyna and came to Canada in 1948. He was a benefactor of many Ukrainian causes. The fund has grown considerably as a result of many contributions from individuals and organizations in Canada and the United States. In April 1996 a $10,000 bequest from the estate of Steven Kobrynsky of Canora, Saskatchewan, established the Steven Kobrynsky Memorial Scholarship, awarded every two years to an undergraduate who excels in the study of the Ukrainian language. The first award was made in 2000, and as of the 2010–11 academic year there have been seven recipients. Today, income from the CIUS Endowment Fund supports a broad range of CIUS projects and activities.

Kobrynsky Undergraduate Scholarship Application


Volodymyr and Daria Kubijovyč Memorial Endowment Fund: $436,748

Established in November 1986 with a bequest from the estate of Professor Volodymyr Kubijovyč and matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta. Prof. Kubijovyč completed his doctoral studies at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow and became a prominent geographer. He served as editor-in-chief of the general three-volume Entsyklopediia ukraïnoznavstva (Munich, 1948–52), the two-volume Ukraine: A Concise Encyclopaedia (Toronto, 1963–71), the ten-volume Entsyklopediia ukraïnoznavstva (Paris and New York, 1955–80), and the Encyclopedia of Ukraine (initial volumes, 1984–88), all of which gave him the latitude to harness the intellectual resources of Ukraine's émigré scholars and ensure that their knowledge would be passed on to future generations. He passed away in Paris on 2 November 1985 at the age of 85. Since its inception, the fund has received donations from numerous individuals and organizations. Initially, income helped fund the Entsyklopediia ukraïnoznavstva, the Encyclopedia of Ukraine, and the Shevchenko Scientific Society branch in Sarcelles, France. Today, proceeds help fund the Internet Encyclopedia of Ukraine Project.

Encyclopedia of Ukraine


Petro Malofij Endowment Fund: $152,058

Established as the Marusia Onyshchuk and Ivanko Kharuk Memorial Endowment Fund in December 1986 by Petro Malofij (1921–2011). Mr. Malofij was born in the village of Tulova near Sniatyn in western Ukraine and came to Edmonton in 1952. He created the fund in memory of two of his sisters' children, Marusia and Ivanko, who both died tragically as young adults in separate accidents near their homes. The initial capital of $10,000 was matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta, and, since the inception of the fund, Mr. Malofij has made regular contributions to increase its value. The income funds scholarships for students from the Sniatyn region specializing in history, political science, law, and economics at Chernivtsi National University.


Stephania Bukachevska-Pastushenko Archival Endowment Fund: $300,430

This endowment was first established by Stephania Bukachevska-Pastushenko at the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies (CFUS) in Toronto with an initial capital of $100,000. In January 1987, CFUS transferred the funds to CIUS which were then matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta. Mrs. Bukachevska-Pastushenko was born in Skala in Galicia. After completing a teacher-training course in Stanyslaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), she taught in Konin, Poland, then left for Germany in 1944 and immigrated to Canada in 1948. She dedicated the endowment to the memory of her mother, who valued learning and encouraged knowledge of one's cultural heritage. Income from the fund supports archival research, cataloguing of existing collections, and publication of research aids. To date, the publication of well over 30 research reports has been funded from its proceeds.


Ukrainian Professional and Business Club of Edmonton Endowment Fund: $600,825

This fund, established in April 1987 and matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta, created the Ukrainian Language Education Centre (ULEC) at CIUS. A number of individuals have also contributed to this fund. The Ukrainian Professional and Business Club of Edmonton has long been a mainstay of Ukrainian-language education. It played a significant role in establishing the English-Ukrainian bilingual program in Alberta, which led the way for the development of bilingual programs in other provinces and other languages. The club contributes to the publication of textbooks, teacher development, and the production of student and teacher learning resources (print, non-print and online) for Ukrainian bilingual classes, most notably Nova: A Ukrainian Language Development Series and www.oomRoom.ca.

Ukrainian Language Education Program


Michael and Daria Kowalsky Endowment Fund: $2,000,724

Established by Daria Mucak-Kowalsky and the late Michael Kowalsky (1908–2000) of Toronto in December 1987 to fund academic research, scholarships and scholarly publications. The government of Alberta matched the initial donation of $100,000 two-to-one. The Kowalskys' commitment to Ukrainian studies and Ukrainian independence grew directly out of their life experiences. Both grew up as ardent Ukrainian patriots and were actively involved in the social and political life of western Ukraine. Mr. Kowalsky was born in Uhornyky in the Stanyslaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk) region and obtained his law degree from Lviv University. Mrs. Kowalsky (née Mucak) was born in Burshtyn in the same region and graduated from a private women's teachers' college run by the Basilian Sisters in Stanyslaviv. In 1998, 1999, and 2000 the Kowalskys increased the capital of their endowment by $1,650,000 and requested that the entire fund be used for the newly established endowment: Kowalsky Program for the Study of Eastern Ukraine

 

The endowment includes funding for the Kowalsky Eastern Institute of Ukrainian Studies, established at the V. N. Karazin National University of Kharkiv in 2000. Since 2001 the Program has sponsored archaeological excavations of Baturyn, the capital of the Cossack state.The overall objective of the Kowalsky Program is to support Ukrainian studies and the national revival in eastern Ukraine through the many projects of the Eastern Institute, including scholarly research, the publication of the journal Схід–Захід (East–West), and the sponsorship of an annual student research paper competition.

Kowalsky Program


Petro Czornyj Memorial Endowment Fund: $30,000

Established in June 1988 with a $10,000 bequest, which was matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta, from the estate of Petro Czornyj. Mr. Czornyj, a lawyer by profession, and his wife, Zenovia Sabarai-Czornyj, a teacher, were both born in Lviv. Following their arrival in Canada, Mr. Czornyj was unable to practice law and worked for various Toronto companies. Initially income from the fund supported work on the Encyclopedia of Ukraine; today it provides grants to scholars from Ukraine.


Cosbild Investment Club Endowment Fund: $105,546

Established in June 1988 by contributions from members of a private Toronto investment club. The initial donation of $33,500 was later augmented by club members and matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta. The fund has supported scholarly publications in Ukrainian studies, including the following works: Bohdan S. Kordan and Peter Melnycky, eds., In the Shadow of the Rockies: Diary of the Castle Mountain Internment Camp, 1915–1917; Anna Procyk, Russian Nationalism and Ukraine: The Nationality Policy of the Volunteer Army during the Civil War; Ihor Rymaruk, ed., Antolohiia novoï ukraïns΄koï poeziï; Yuri Andrukhovych, Recreations, trans. Marko Pavlyshyn; and Manoly R. Lupul, The Politics of Multiculturalism: A Ukrainian-Canadian Memoir.


Peter Jacyk Endowment Fund: $3,013,779

Established by the late Peter Jacyk (1921–2001, Mississauga, Ontario) in June 1988; his initial contribution of $1,000,000 was matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta. In August 1989 the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research was established at CIUS. Its major project became the English translation of Mykhailo Hrushevsky's monumental ten-volume History of Ukraine-Rus΄ Mr. Jacyk was born in 1921 in Synevidsko in the Stryi region of western Ukraine; he came to Canada in 1949 and settled in Toronto, where he became one of the most successful Ukrainian businessmen in Canada. In 1986 he established the Petro Jacyk Education Foundation

 

His many philanthropic activities and contributions to North American universities (Alberta, Harvard, Columbia, Toronto) and the University of London (England) helped raise the profile of Ukrainian studies in the West. In addition to establishing the endowment fund at CIUS, Mr. Jacyk, together with Dr. Jeanette Bayduza, donated $100,000 for the publication of volume 6 of the English translation of the History of Ukraine-Rus΄. Income from the fund has been used to support a monograph series, organize symposia and conferences, and fund scholarships and research grants. On 7 June 1995, Mr. Jacyk was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Alberta.


Stasiuk Family Endowment Fund: $1,496,595

Established in July 1988 with a bequest from the estate of Eudokia Stasiuk (Toronto). The initial contribution of $350,000 was matched two-to-one by the government of Alberta. The fund is named in honour of Vasyl, Eudokia, Anna, and Yakiv Stasiuk, all born in the village of Tovmachyk in the Kolomyia district of Ivano-Frankivsk oblast. Dr. Vasyl Stasiuk (1887–1960) obtained his doctorate at Vienna University and taught at the Ukrainian Underground University in Lviv (when western Ukraine was under Polish rule and access to higher education in Ukrainian was virtually non-existent). After the war he moved to Stryi with his family. Eudokia (1895–1987) and Anna (1902–1989) both graduated from the Teachers' College of the Ukrainian Pedagogical Society in Kolomyia and taught until the outbreak of war. Their brother Yakiv (1905–1978) was active in various cultural and civic endeavors in his native village. The three siblings immigrated to Canada in the late 1940s. They donated the bulk of their life savings to CIUS. In 1990, proceeds from the fund founded the Stasiuk Program for the Study of Contemporary Ukraine, which serves as an information centre on developments in Ukraine for the scholarly community, government, the media, and the general public. The Stasiuk Program's major research commitment has been the study of Ukrainian-Russian relations; it also houses an archive on twentieth-century Ukraine, undertakes research projects, and sponsors scholars and lecturers working on contemporary Ukrainian issues.

Stasiuk Program


Anna and Nikander Bukowsky Endowment Fund: $117,680

Established by Anna and Nikander Bukowsky (Saskatoon) in November 1988 with an initial donation of $10,000; augmented by $50,000 in February 1993 and $51,200 in May 1994. Until 1996, income from the fund supported scholarly research and publications. At the founders' request, income from the fund was redirected to support the Ukrainian Church Studies Program (now the Research Program on Religion and Culture). Mr. Bukowsky was born in the town of Vyshnivtsia in Volhynia and immigrated to Canada in 1929 at the age of twenty-four. He settled in Saskatoon, where he took an active part in Ukrainian community and cultural life and helped organize one of the first Ukrainian credit unions in Canada. Mrs. Anna Bukowsky (née Kovalyshyn) was born in Ituna, Saskatchewan. The Bukowskys also contributed to the John Kolasky Endowment Fund.


Nestor and Zenovia Salomon Memorial Endowment Fund: $26,667

Established by Wasyl and Halyna (née Khomyn) Salomon (Toronto) in December 1988 to mark the millennium of Christianity in Rus΄-Ukraine and in memory of their relatives Nestor Salomon and Zenoviia Salomon (née Lopushanska). The initial contribution to the fund was $15,000 and was designated for the support of Ukrainian language and literature projects. Mr. Wasyl Salomon was born on 14 January 1908 in Komarnyky in the Turka region of Galicia. He graduated from the Academy in Dubliany, immigrated to Canada in 1948, and married Halyna Khomyn in 1956. Together they operated a grocery store in Toronto and supported Ukrainian church and cultural activities.


Juchymenko Family Endowment Fund: $5,000

Established by Ivan Juchymenko (Islington, Ontario) in January 1989 to fund scholarly research in Ukrainian history, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Alexander and Helen Kulahyn Endowment Fund: $50,000

Established by Alexander and Helen Kulahyn (Sardis, B.C.) in May 1989 to provide research grants and scholarships to scholars in the field of Ukrainian legal studies.


Dmytro Stepovyk Ukrainian Studies Endowment Fund: $4,700

Established by Dmytro Stepovyk (Kyiv) in May 1989 to fund scholarly research and publications in Ukrainian art history. Dr. Stepovyk was a visiting professor in the Department of Slavic and East European Studies, University of Alberta, from January to June 1989 and senior research fellow at the Rylsky Institute of Art History, Folklore and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Kyiv). He is the author of numerous works in the history of Ukrainian art.


Helen Darcovich Memorial Endowment Fund: $298,833

Established by Dr. Vlas Darcovich (Edmonton) in July 1989 in memory of his wife, Helen (Olena), née Michalenko, who passed away in 1977. Dr. Darcovich, an economist specializing in statistics, came to CIUS as a research fellow in 1988. A substantial part of the financial resources for the fund came from Helen's life insurance policy and other assets that Dr. Darcovich had consolidated. His initial contribution was matched by the government of Alberta. Helen Darcovich was the daughter of pioneers; her parents, Matthew and Barbara, settled in the Hafford district of Saskatchewan at the turn of the twentieth century. She obtained a bachelor's degree in household science from the University of Saskatchewan. Proceeds from the endowment fund support the Helen Darcovich Memorial Doctoral Fellowship, which is offered to Ph.D. students who have completed all degree requirements and are in the process of writing a dissertation on a Ukrainian or Ukrainian-Canadian topic in pedagogy, history, law, the humanities and social sciences, women's studies, or library science. The fund became operational during the 1992–93 academic year; as of the 2010–11 academic year 36 students have been recipients of the fellowship.

Darcovich Doctoral Fellowship Application


Dr. Ivan Iwanciw and Dr. Myroslawa Mysko-Iwanciw Endowment Fund: $128,929

Established by Dr. Myroslawa Iwanciw (née Mysko) of Elmwood Park , Illinois, in August 1989. Until 2001, income funded a scholarly exchange between York University (Toronto) and an institution in Ukraine. It now funds scholarships for students at the Kyiv Mohyla Academy National University. Dr. Myroslawa Iwanciw was born in 1919 in Vynnyky near Lviv. She received her higher education in western Europe and obtained a doctorate in dentistry from Heidelberg University in 1948. A year later she married Dr. Ivan Iwanciw (1920–82), who was born in Liatske Velyke near Zolochiv in western Ukraine. His studies took him from Lviv to Prague, and he obtained a doctorate in medicine from Erlangen University in 1947. Following his arrival in the USA, he practiced medicine in the Chicago area. The Iwanciws were active members of the Ukrainian community and took a special interest in social and educational affairs. They supported students in various Ukrainian communities around the world, especially in Ukraine.


CIUS Exchanges with Ukraine Endowment Fund: $36,006

Established by many donors from across Canada in November 1989. The fund was created to foster the development of academic exchanges with Ukraine.


Marusia and Michael Dorosh Endowment Fund: $100,075

Established by the late Michael Dorosh (Toronto) in November 1989 to provide fellowships for students pursuing a master's degree in Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian studies. Mr. Dorosh was born on 30 July1920 in Ustryky, western Ukraine. In 1941 he was taken to Germany to work as a forced labourer in industry. After the war he lived in Displaced Persons' camps. Settling in Toronto in 1948, he worked for the Hydro Electric Company. Marusia Dorosh (née Klym, 1925–82), was born in Soroky in western Ukraine. In 1937 she left Ukraine to join her father, who had earlier immigrated to Canada and was living in Sioux Lookout, Ontario. Marusia and Michael were married in Toronto in 1955. Both loved music and sang in various prominent Ukrainian choirs. The fund supports a minimum of one fellowship per year; it became operational in 1990 and as of the 2010–11 academic year, 26 students had received the Marusia and Michael Dorosh Master's Fellowship.

Dorosh Master's Fellowship Application


Petro and Ivanna Stelmach Endowment Fund: $150,000

Established by Petro (1916–2008) and Ivanna Stelmach (1924–2008) (Mississauga) in November 1989 to provide research grants and scholarships in Ukrainian studies. Mr. Stelmach was born on 15 June 1918 in Buchach, western Ukraine, and is a graduate of a commercial school and of cooperative banking courses. He was incarcerated four times in Polish prisons during the 1930s and was also a prisoner in Dachau. After coming to Canada in 1949, he found employment in a factory and then in the construction industry. He eventually founded his own company, Sky Light Construction. Mrs. Stelmach (née Stoikevych) was born on 25 October1924 in Zhovkva, western Ukraine, and, like her husband, was a graduate of a commercial school and of cooperative banking courses. In addition to establishing the endowment fund, Mr. and Mrs. Stelmach contributed $100,000 toward the publication of the English translation of volume one of Hrushevsky's History of Ukraine-Rus΄. Since 1993, the fund has been used to support the Institute for Historical Research at Lviv National University. Two annual scholarships for history students at the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv were initiated in 1995.


Oleh Zujewskyj Endowment Fund: $20,000

Established by the late Professor Oleh Zujewskyj (1920–1996) in December 1989 to support the publication of literary works by Ukrainian writers living outside Ukraine. Oleh Zujewskyj was a poet, translator, and professor at the University of Alberta in the Department of Slavic and East European Studies. He was born in Khomuttsi, Ukraine, studied journalism in Kharkiv, and completed his studies in 1950 at the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained an M.A. and Ph.D. He published many translations of European and American poetry, as well as several original collections of poetry: Zoloti vorota, Pid znakom feniksa, Kassiopeia, Parafrazy, and Holub sered atel΄ie.


Tymofij and Evhenia Taborowskyj Endowment Fund: $20,500

Established by Tymofij and Evhenia Taborowskyj (Toronto) in April 1990 to fund the research and publication of works by scholars in Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian studies. The fund was established in honour of Tymofij and Evhenia Taborowskyj, Oleksander and Olena Taborowskyj, and Yaroslava Pankiv. Mr. Taborowskyj was born in Galicia on 3 March 1916. He arrived in Canada in 1949 and settled in Toronto, where he worked as a welder and became an active member of the St. Volodymyr Ukrainian Orthodox parish. Mrs. Taborowskyj (née Pidhaina) was born on 12 November 1914 in the village of Muzhyliv in Galicia. She moved to Yugoslavia in 1928 and to Toronto in 1951. They married in 1959. Mr. Taborowskyj was interested in folk arts; as a young man, he learned the art of ornamentation and straw work, which he taught to many others. He designed and created an ornamental box especially for CIUS as a lasting memento of his generosity and support.


John Kolasky Memorial Endowment Fund: $751,938

This fund was originally established in May 1990 as the Ukraine Exchange Fellowship Endowment Fund by the late John Kolasky (Surrey, B.C.), Pauline and the late Peter Kindrachuk (Vernon, B.C.), William and Justine Fedeyko (St. Albert, Alberta), and many organizations and individuals from the Ukrainian community across Canada. The fund was created to provide fellowships for Ukrainian scholars and professionals to conduct research and study in Canada. The initial capital of $127,000 was collected by the founders. Mr. Kolasky continued to work tirelessly to build the financial base of the fund throughout the early 1990s. In 1998, following his death, and at the request of the co-founders and several of his friends, the name was changed to the John Kolasky Memorial Endowment Fund in tribute to his memory and many accomplishments.

Mr. Kolasky was born on 5 October 1915 in the coal-mining town of Cobalt, Ontario. He attended the universities of Saskatchewan, Toronto (M.A., 1950) and Manitoba. He taught high school and was active in the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians (AUUC) and the Communist Party of Canada (CPC). From 1963 to 1965, he attended the Higher Party School of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine in Kyiv, where he observed the Russification of Ukrainian institutions. Mr. Kolasky's subsequent exposé, entitled Education in Soviet Ukraine (1968), earned him an expulsion from the AUUC and the CPC. In all he wrote, compiled, translated or edited eight books. Mr. Kolasky died on 20 October 1997 in the village of Khotiv near Kyiv, where he had been living with the family of Levko Lukianenko, a well-known former dissident.


Vasil Kravcenko Endowment Fund: $10,000

Established by the late Dr. Vasil Kravcenko (Hanover, Germany) in February 1991 to fund scholarships and research grants for scholars in Ukrainian studies.


Nestor Peczeniuk Memorial Endowment Fund: $82,000

Established by Jaroslawa and Sonia Peczeniuk (Sudbury, Ontario) in December 1991. Mr. Peczeniuk (1925–1986), the son of Yosyf and Maria Peczeniuk, was born in Stetseva, Sniatyn district, now in the Ivano-Frankivsk oblast. He studied at the commercial school in Sniatyn and joined the Galician Division in 1943. Following the war he immigrated to England, where he met and married Jaroslava Kharaborska in 1951. They arrived in Sudbury three years later and, in time, Mr. Peczeniuk became the administrator of the Ukrainian Credit Union. Mr. and Mrs. Peczeniuk had a high regard for learning and for the Ukrainian language and culture, which they passed on to their daughters, Sonia, Oksana, and Zoriika. The fund provides research grants for scholars in Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian studies.


Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Endowment Fund: $54,175

Established by Myron Dylynsky (Toronto) in December 1991. The endowment has also received matching funds from Xerox Canada. Wolodymyr Dylynsky was born on 31 August 1911 in Lviv, the son of the Rev. Edvyn Teofil and Maria Stefaniia (née Yuzychynska). He graduated from law school but was dismissed from his first job for political reasons. Mr. Dylynsky was a member of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and was deported to Siberia when he fell into the hands of the Soviets. Upon his return to Lviv in 1941, he married Lidiia Kunynets. In 1944 they fled to Innsbruck, Austria, and then emigrated to Canada in 1950 with their daughters, Marta and Iryna. Their son, Myron, was born in Toronto. Mr. Dylynsky worked in various enterprises and was active in the Ukrainian Bar Association. He died after a lengthy illness on 9 July 1972. The fund provides research or publication grants in Ukrainian studies to scholars affiliated with academic, cultural and educational institutions in Lviv.


Mykola Klid Memorial Endowment Fund: $61,150

Established in December 1992 by Maria Diakunyk (Kitchener, Ontario) and her three children, Dr. Bohdan Klid (Edmonton), Myroslav Klid (Mississauga, Ontario), and Maria Zadarko (Kitchener). Mykola Klid was born on 22 March1922 in the village of Ostrynia, near the regional centre of Stanyslaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk). With the outbreak of World War II, he became active in the struggle against both the German and Soviet occupations. In 1944, he fled to Germany and in 1947 immigrated to Canada, where he found work at the Copper Cliff smelter of the International Nickel Company near Sudbury, Ontario. A year later he married Maria Hrynkiw (now Maria Diakunyk). Mr. Klid was active in the Ukrainian community of Sudbury, especially in supporting the activities of the Ukrainian Youth Association (Spilka ukraïns΄koï molodi). He died tragically on 17 June 1963 as a result of third-degree burns suffered in a work accident at the smelter. Family members and friends of Mr. Klid continue to contribute to the growth of the fund, which supports fellowships and research grants in Ukrainian studies.


Teodota and Iwan Klym Memorial Endowment Fund: $35,353

Established in April 1995 with a bequest from the estate of Teodota Klym, who passed away in Edmonton in 1993. Her husband, Iwan, died in 1973. They were both natives of Bukovyna and long-time residents of Edmonton, actively involved in Ukrainian national causes and members of St. John's Orthodox parish. The fund supports CIUS scholarly activities, including fellowships, publications, and the organization of conferences, primarily in co-operation with the Yurii Fedkovych National University of Chernivtsi.


Research Program on Religion and Culture Endowment Fund: $45,021

Formerly named the Ukrainian Church Studies Program Endowment Fund. This fund was established in November 1995 with a bequest from the estate of Harry Bratkiw (Edmonton) and donations from St. John's Fraternal Society (Edmonton) and St. Andrew's College (Winnipeg). The program was established at CIUS in 1994 to address the need for interdenominational research in religious studies, especially after the commemoration of the millennium of Christianity in Rus΄-Ukraine and the beginnings of the religious revival in Ukraine. The program had the active support of the eminent authority on the Ukrainian Catholic and Orthodox churches, the late Professor Bohdan Bociurkiw of Carleton University, Ottawa, who also bequeathed his valuable library and archives to CIUS. The fund offers fellowships, supports independent research, and facilitates research and publication by scholars in the field of religious studies.


Shwed Family Endowment Fund in Memory of Ostap and Vera Shwed: $32,700

This fund was originally named the Ostap Teofil Shwed Memorial Endowment Fund and was established in April 1996 by Vera Shwed and her four sons, Eugene, Dennis, Philip, and Mark. Following the death of their mother, family members renamed the fund in honour of the family and in memory of their parents. Vera and Ostap Shwed were both active in the Ukrainian communities of Vancouver, Edmonton and Ottawa. They valued Ukrainian language and cultural education in the family and community. Mrs. Shwed was born in Mackay, Alberta, on 10 October 1932 and was a homemaker. Mr. Shwed, an engineer, was born in Drohobych, Ukraine, on 10 June 1920 and came to Canada in April 1947. In Ottawa, he was a teacher and director of the St. John the Baptist Ukrainian parish school and a teacher of Ukrainian-language courses. Vera was long an active member of the Ukrainian Catholic Women's League. The fund supports projects at the Ukrainian Language Education Centre that promote teacher professional development and the improvement of language courses.

 


Stephen and Olga Pawliuk Endowment Fund: $50,000

Established in August 1996 by Olga Pawliuk (Toronto), initially to support the Hrushevsky Translation Project and then to support research and publishing in Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian history. Mrs. Pawliuk was born in Kodnia, Ukraine, and educated at the Zhytomyr Polytechnic. She immigrated to Canada in 1928 and settled near Winnipeg with her parents, a brother, and two sisters. In time, the family moved to Toronto, where Olga met and married Stephen Pawliuk, the Canadian-born son of Alberta homesteaders and an electronics graduate from the Marconi School of Radio Technology in Chicago. Mrs. Pawliuk accompanied her husband to London, England, when he joined the British Merchant Marine in 1938; shortly thereafter, he enlisted in the Royal Air Force and helped develop the first British radar installations during World War II. In 1952, Mr. Pawliuk started the Ukrainian-Canadian Collection in the University of Toronto Library. Mrs. Pawliuk also sponsored the publication of volume 7 of Hrushevsky's History of Ukraine-Rus΄ in memory of her husband.


Stelmaschuk Extension Education Endowment Fund: $30,400

Established in October 1996 with a $10,000 donation from Professor Paul Stelmaschuk and Mrs. Anna Stelmaschuk (Kelowna, B.C.) and $10,000 from the late Mrs. Nancy Shemeluck-Radomsky (Edmonton) and Mrs. Mary Orchuk, and $1,000 from Mrs. Jean Naciuk. Since 1993, the fund has been used to support the Institute for Historical Research at the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv. The fund was founded in honour of Dr. Stelmaschuk's parents, Joseph and Sophia, who had emigrated from western Ukraine prior to World War I and homesteaded near Spedden, Alberta. The fund supports extension education in Ukraine by assisting Ukrainians who are engaged or intend to work in this field. It can also be utilized by distance-learning workers from Canada to help educate prospective extension workers in Ukraine.


Michael Zacharuk Memorial Endowment Fund: $10,000

Established in November 1996 by Mary Zacharuk (Two Hills, Alberta, 1917–2008), in memory of her husband, Michael (1908–1996). As a young boy growing up and going to school in Berehomet, Bukovyna, Michael had always dreamt of coming to Canada, but it was difficult to convince his father to let him do so. Finally, in 1928, his father relented and sponsored the passage. Michael settled near Hairy Hill, Alberta, with a family who had been neighbours in his village. In 1936 he married Mary Mandryk, and shortly thereafter they moved to British Columbia, first to New Westminster and then to Burnaby, where they owned a store. Upon retirement they decided to move back to Hairy Hill. Both their daughter, Diane, and their son, Taras, still reside in British Columbia. Mr. Zacharuk was proud of his Ukrainian heritage and always grateful for the opportunities afforded him in Canada. He always wanted to give "something back to Canada" and did so by being an active and generous supporter of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church and many local community organizations. The Michael Zacharuk Memorial Endowment Fund supports scholarships and publications in Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian studies.


Remeza Family Endowment Fund: $100,000

Established in December 1998 by Sylvester Remeza (1914–2002, Ottawa). Mr. Remeza fought in the Battle of Brody in 1944 and was a member of the 1st Ukrainian Division of the Ukrainian National Army; after the war, he worked in Ontario as an engineer. He was also a generous benefactor, especially of projects pertaining to the Galician writer, literary scholar, civic figure and artist Bohdan Lepky, who was his maternal uncle. He helped fund the Bohdan Lepky museums in Berezhany and Zhovkva, Ukraine, and contributed toward the first-ever statue of the writer, which was erected in Berezhany. The Remeza Family Endowment Fund supports research and publications pertaining to the work and legacy of Bohdan Lepky.


Dmytro and Stephania Kupiak Fund: $50,000

Established in December 1998 by Stephania Kupiak (Milton, Ontario). Mr. Kupiak was born in Yablonivka in western Ukraine on 5 November 1918, at a time when Ukraine was independent, as he liked to point out. He attended business college in Lviv, was a member of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists, and arrived in Canada in 1948. Mrs. Kupiak was born in Edgerton, Alberta, on 23 April 1930. They met and were married in Edmonton in 1953 and later moved to Toronto, where they prospered and were pillars of the Ukrainian community. Mr. Kupiak passed away on 13 June 1995, and Mrs. Kupiak erected a monument in front of her late husband's house in Yablonivka. She also funded the renovation of his boyhood school, which has a bronze plaque and bust dedicated to him. The fund offers scholarships to graduates of the Busk State Secondary School who go on to study economics, political science, law, and international relations at the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv.


Celestin and Irena Suchowersky Endowment Fund: $86,000

Established in September 1999 by Dr. Celestin (Mykola) Suchowersky (Edmonton, 1913–2008). Dr. Suchowersky was born in Bukovyna in 1913. He obtained a Ph.D. in political economy from Chernivtsi University in 1939 and a master's degree in library sciences from the University of Washington (Seattle) in 1960. Mrs. Irena Suchowersky (née Kalynovska) was born in Kyiv in 1926 and earned an M.A. in Russian literature in 1969 from the University of Alberta. They met in Germany and were married in 1949, just days before their departure for Canada. Both were very active in Ukrainian organizations. Mr. Suchowersky's love of scholarship and understanding of the needs of Ukrainian education in Canada and Ukraine led him and his wife to establish the Celestin and Irena Suchowersky Endowment Fund. The fund offers fellowships at the M.A. or Ph.D. level to residents of Bukovyna to study at a Canadian university in the disciplines of Sociology, Psychology, Economics,or Ukrainian Studies.


Fedeyko Family Endowment Fund: $102,439

Established in November 2000 by William and Justine (1914–2011) Fedeyko (St. Albert, Alberta). The couple met at the Mohyla Ukrainian Institute in Saskatoon and were married in July 1938. Both acknowledge that the institution significantly shaped their Ukrainian identity and taught them the importance of community life. They have been active members of and contributors to many organizations, including hockey and softball clubs, agricultural and hospital boards, Ukrainian youth and choir groups, and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. They have passed on the spirit of giving to their sons, daughters, grandchildren, and their respective families, who make annual contributions to the family fund. The endowment supports the Ukrainian Canadian Studies by funding scholarly research, conferences, community outreach activities, and the publication of works in this field. Prior to founding the family fund, Mr. and Mrs. Fedeyko were co-founders of the John Kolasky Memorial Endowment Fund, to which they contributed more than $100,000.


Michael Kowalsky and Daria Mucak-Kowalsky Scholarship Endowment Fund (2000): $28,948

Established in December 2000 by Daria Mucak-Kowalsky (Toronto). The primary purpose of the fund is to offer scholarships to students enrolled in master's, candidate, doctoral, or other advanced degree programs in Ukraine and in Canada. Scholarships are offered to students specializing in international relations, political science, history, cultural studies, economics, sociology, and psychology at the Ivan Franko National Universityat Lviv, Ivano-Frankivsk National University, and the Kyiv Mohyla Academy National University. In Canada, scholarships are offered to those studying Ukrainian language, literature, history, international relations, and political science at any Canadian university, with preference to students at the University of Alberta.


Michael Kowalsky and Daria Mucak-Kowalsky Encyclopedia of Ukraine Endowment Fund: $170,000

Established in April 2004 by Daria Mucak-Kowalsky (Toronto). The fund supports the preparation, editing, and updating of entries pertaining to Ukrainian history in the Internet Encyclopedia of Ukraine.


Mykhailo Onufriiovych Samytsia Endowment Fund: $215,000

Established in November 2005 by Mykhailo Onufriiovych Samytsia (1920–2009) (Edmonton) in memory of his father, Onufrii Ivanovych Samytsia; his mother, Anastasia Dmytrivna Samytsia (née Stoianovska); and his wife, Maria Hryhorivna Samytsia (née Sharyk) with a donation of $208,500 from Mykhailo Samytsia and $5,000 from the estate of Maria Samytsia. Mr. Samytsia was born in 1920 in the village of Denysiv in western Ukraine. His father left for Canada in 1929; five years later, he was joined by his wife and Mykhailo's two younger sisters. At the age of fourteen, Mykhailo Samytsia was forced to stay behind in Ukraine owing to illness, hoping that he would soon recover and follow his family. However, because of the outbreak of war and the subsequent annexation of western Ukraine to the Soviet Union, it was not until 9 July 1963 that Mykhailo, along with his wife, Maria, was reunited with his family in Edmonton. The fund is designated in support of the scholarly and research activities of CIUS.


Stephen and Olga Pawliuk Ukrainian Studies Endowment Fund: $50,000

Established in January 2006 by Olga Pawliuk in support of the scholarly and research activities of CIUS, with priority to online computer-based initiatives.


Dr. Ivan Iwanciw and Dr. Myroslawa Mysko-Iwanciw Ukrainian Studies Endowment Fund: $57,105

Established by Dr. Myroslawa Iwanciw (née Mysko) of Elmwood Park, Illinois, in April 2006 in support of CIUS activities, with priority to Ukrainian students and scholars conducting research in Ukrainian studies.


Peter and Doris Kule Endowment for the Study of the Ukrainian Diaspora: $213,150

Established in September 2006 by Drs. Peter and Doris Kule (Edmonton) with an initial donation of $100,000, which was matched by the Government of Alberta. Additional contributions have been received from individuals and organizations. The fund supports the study of the Ukrainian diaspora within the framework of the Ukrainian Canadian Program at CIUS.


Ivan Franko School of Ukrainian Studies Endowment Fund: $119,464

Established by the Ivan Franko School of Ukrainian Studies (Edmonton) in October 2006 to commemorate its fiftieth anniversary with an initial donation of $75,000. The amount was later increased by additional funds from the school and individual donors. The income from the fund will offer travel grants to post-secondary students who wish to continue their studies in Ukrainian at universities in Ukraine.


Ivan and Zenovia Boyko Endowment Fund: $30,000

Established by Ivan and Zenovia Boyko (Edmonton) in January 2007 in support of the Internet Encyclopaedia of Ukraine Project. The fund was created as a tribute to the memory of Mr. Boyko's mother, Kateryna Boyko (née Shchybylok) and for their grandchildren to have computer-based access to information about Ukraine and Ukrainians.


Mykhailo, Volodymyr and Olia Halchuk Memorial Endowment Fund:  $50,000

Established by Jaroslaw Halchuk (St. Catharines, Ontario) in July 2007 in memory of his sons, Mykhailo and Volodymyr, and wife, Olia.  Proceeds from the fund support the scholarly, student and research activities of CIUS.


Peter and Doris Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies at CIUS Centre Endowment Fund:  $905,000:  

Established by Drs. Peter and Doris Kule (Edmonton) in August 2007 to support the Ukrainian Canadian Program, now known at the Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies Centre at CIUS.  Mr. Andriy Semotiuk contributed $5,000 towards this Endowment. It supports the expansion of the Institute's multifaceted commitment to documenting and sharing the wealth of the Ukrainian Canadian experience.


Rev. Dmytro and Stephania Baziuk (Rudakewycz) Memorial Endowment Fund: $7,000

Established by Myron and Luba Baziuk (Edmonton) in August 2007 in support of the study of Ukrainian intellectual and cultural life in western Ukraine, with emphasis on the history of Lviv and the Lviv region; women's studies in western Ukraine and scholarly publications in the aforementioned areas. The fund also supports students from the University of Lviv who have been selected for the University of Alberta student exchange program.


Eugene and Olena Borys Endowment Fund: $25,000

Established by Oksana Boszko, Roman Borys, Adrian Borys, and Marko Borys in January 2008 in support of the Encyclopedia of Ukraine and other encyclopedia projects in all forms: print, electronic, and other media, under the direction of CIUS.


Michael Kowalsky and Daria Mucak-Kowalsky Ukrainian Diaspora Endowment Fund: $30,000

Established by Daria Mucak-Kowalsky in January 2008 to conduct research and publish materials of the Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies Centre at CIUS dealing with the most recent ("fourth wave") Ukrainian emigration to Canada.


Father Hryhorij Fil and Olga Fil Endowment Fund: $50,000

Established by Father Hryhorij Fil and Olga Fil (1935–2009) of Redwater, Alberta in November 2008 to support research and publication of historical works and historical religious sources on topics in Ukrainian history or related topics in Ukrainian studies, such as Ukrainian literary history and the history of the Ukrainian language in Canada, as well as to support research and publication of liturgical books, religious literature, and studies on church affairs and religion.


Walter Litynsky and Irene Litynsky Endowment Fund: $10,020

Established in February 2009 with a bequest from the estate of Walter and Irene Litynsky (Windsor, Ontario). The fund supports research and publishing in Ukrainian and Ukrainian Canadian history.


Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Modern Ukrainian History and Society Endowment Fund: $1,000,000

Established in February 2009 by a donation of $500,000 from the Petro Jacyk Education Foundation

Matched by the Government of Alberta, the fund supports the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Modern Ukrainian History and Society, a collaborative project between the University of Alberta and two major universities in Lviv: the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv and the Ukrainian Catholic University. Under the auspices of the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at CIUS, the program studies modern Ukraine, with an initial focus on key issues in twentieth-century Ukrainian history such as the Famine-Genocide of 1932–33, Ukraine's role in the Second World War, the dissident movement in Soviet Ukraine, the Orange Revolution, and new developments in independent Ukraine. It is also responsible for the academic journal Ukraїna moderna, a major Lviv collection of oral history recordings, organizing international symposia on topics in modern Ukrainian history, and supporting the research work of promising younger historians and their education in Ukraine and Canada.


Danylo Husar Struk and Oksana Pisetska Struk Endowment Fund: $101,010

Established in November 2009 by transferring the Danylo Husar Struk Memorial Fund at the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies (Toronto) in the amount of $100,000, the fund supports the Danylo Husar Struk Program in Ukrainian Literature at CIUS by providing grants to established scholars for the critical analysis of Ukrainian literature, sponsoring research, scholarly writing, and translation of Ukrainian literature, organizing workshops, public lectures and readings on Ukrainian literature, and supporting publications in Ukrainian literature.


Dr. Wasyl and Parasia Iwanec (Krysa) Endowment Fund: $25,000

Established in July 2010 by Parasia Iwanec (St. Catharines, Ontario) in memory of her late husband, Dr. Wasyl Iwanec (1905–1979) with a donation of $25,000. The fund supports research and publications at СIUS and provides scholarships and bursaries for students and research grants for scholars in the area of Ukrainian studies.


Alberta Ukrainian Heritage Foundation Endowment Fund: $45,495

Established in August 2010 by a donation of $25,000 from this Edmonton-based foundation. The fund is under the direction of the Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies Centre at CIUS. Additional donations have been received from the Foundation, Sophia and Peter Kyforuk, and Octavia Hall. The fund supports scholarly research on Ukrainian-Canadian history, the preparation of books on Ukrainian-Canadian subjects, sponsorship and participation in academic conferences, and the development of databases in Ukrainian-Canadian studies.


Peter Salyga Endowment Fund: $50,920

Established in August 2010 with a bequest of 20 percent of his estate (Winnipeg, Manitoba), $50,920. The fund supports the publication of and regular updates to the Internet Encyclopedia of Ukraine, as well as other publications of CIUS in English or Ukrainian.


Roman and Halia Kolisnyk Endowment Fund: $15,000

Established in March 2011 by Roman Kolisnyk of Toronto with a donation of $15,000. The purpose of the fund is to support English and French translations and publications (print and electronic) of Ukrainian literary works, literary memoirs, diaries, and correspondence of Ukrainian-Canadian and other diaspora authors.


Levko and Marika Babij Memorial Endowment Fund: $50,000

Established in May 2011 by Marko Babij, Roman Babij, and Nadia (née Babij) Gogus in memory of their parents, Levko and Marika Babij, with a donation of $50,000. The fund supports programs and grants related to the study of twentieth-century Ukrainian history, especially Ukraine in World War II.


 

Information about donors who established endowments was gleaned from previously published CIUS annual reports and newsletters. In case of omissions or errors, please contact Mykola Soroka at msoroka@ualberta.ca or 780.492.6847 (Tel.) or 780.492.4967 (Fax).