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: (Nalyvaiko's Faith: The Cossacks and Religion in Early Modern Ukraine) (2006)

Published by Krytyka (Kyiv) in association with the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at the CIUS, this is a Ukrainian translation of Serhii Plokhy's The Cossacks and Religion in Early Modern Ukraine (2001, winner of the 2003 Book Prize of the American Association for Ukrainian Studies), a pioneering study of the Ukrainian Cossacks religious attitudes and policies, recognized as "the first serious synthetic study of the relationship between the Cossacks and the Orthodox Church." The Ukrainian Cossacks, often compared in historical literature to the pirates of the Mediterranean and the frontiersmen of the American West, became famous as ferocious warriors, their fighting skills developed in their religious wars against the Tartars, Turks, Poles, and Russians. The Cossack revolts have traditionally been viewed in historiography as a species of peasant rebellion, with little ideological appeal beyond that social stratum. [more]


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Voluntary Brotherhood: Confraternities of Laymen in Early Modern Ukraine (2006)
Iaroslav Isaievych

The study of the confraternity movement in early modern Ukraine is vital for our understanding of the unique place Ukrainian culture and society have occupied between Eastern and Western Christianity. Ukraine and Belarus were the only countries where Orthodox lay confraternities came into being. Their activities coincided with a period of crucial social and cultural change. Although structurally similar to their western European counterparts, the Eastern-rite confraternities developed their unique features. They introduced a spirit of competition between the two Ruthenian churches--the Orthodox and the Uniate--and contributed to an increase in the pace of Ruthenian socio-cultural growth. The schools attached to the Orthodox confraternities in several larger cities disseminated European humanist ideas and introduced generally accessible post-humanist education, while the confraternity presses promoted the development of scholarship and literature.

Voluntary Brotherhood is a translation of one of the best works on early modern Ukraine to appear in the USSR after the 1920s. It is also a thoroughly revised and updated version of the original, Ukrainian-language work. The author has not only deleted terminology Soviet censors imposed before the book could be published in Kyiv in 1966, but has also broadened the scope of his analysis by utilizing a comparative approach and taking into account the scholarly literature on the subject published in the past four decades. [more]


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- (19391950) (2005)
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Published by the Ukrainian Catholic University Press in association with the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at the CIUS, this is a Ukrainian translation of Bohdan R. Bociurkiw's Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and the Soviet State, a pioneering study of the suppression of this Ukrainian church under Stalinist rule.

Dr. Bociurkiw's book is the fruit of a lifetime of painstaking research. The study takes into account all the most important publications on the subject. It draws on publications that have appeared in a great variety of religious, Ukrainian underground, Soviet and non-Soviet (especially emigre) journals, newspapers, propagandistic pamphlets, and leaflets.

Many of the Soviet archival materials from Communist Party and government (including KGB) repositories used by the author had been classified and has hitherto remained unknown to scholars and analysts. These sources have been supplemented by documents from ecclesiastical archives in Rome and Ukrainian church repositories in the West. Furthermore, the author has availed himself of a number of oral informants, including victims and eyewitnesses of Soviet repressions against the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine, thereby including in his considerations vital insights that otherwise would not have been preserved. [more]


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Religion and Nation in Modern Ukraine (2003)
Serhii Plokhy and Frank Sysyn

In August 2003 the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press released this 232-page collection of eleven essays.

Drs. Plokhy and Sysyn wrote their articles in 198399. They began their research at a time when East and West were still divided by the Iron CurtainDr. Sysyn was then a professor at Harvard University, and Dr. Plokhy was teaching at Dnipropetrovsk University in Ukraine. Since the early 1990s both scholars were associated with the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. Their diverse educations and experiences underlie their differing interests and perspectives, enlivening the volume.

M uch of the analysis presented in Religion and Nation in Modern Ukraine deals with the responses of Ukraine's Eastern Christians to the challenge of the national idea. The book views the history and current status of Ukraine's Orthodox and Greek Catholic communities in the context of the modern Ukrainian national revival of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and of the resurgence of Ukrainian national consciousness in the late 1980s and early 1990s. [more]

The publication of Religion and Nation in Modern Ukraine was made possible by the support of the Ukrainian Church Studies Program at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, and by the generosity of the Skop Family (in memory of Constantyn Hordienko), the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Ukrainian Self-Reliance League of Edmonton, and the Self-Reliance League Foundation of Canada.


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Between Kyiv and Constantinople (1998)
Andre Partykevych

Dr. Andre Partykevich, a Ukrainian Orthodox clergyman from Boston, examines the life and times of Oleksander Lototsky.

Lototsky (1870-1939), a writer and scholar, was an influential ecclesiastical and political figure who served as minister of religious affairs in 1918 in the government of Hetman Pavlo Skoropadsky. He left Ukraine two years later, serving as Ukraine's ambassador to Turkey and attempting unsuccessfully to gain recognition of the autocephaly of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church from the Patriarchate of Constantinople. Lototsky later settled in Warsaw, where he was a professor of canon law and Orthodox Church history, also serving as minister and deputy premier of the Ukrainian People's Republic in exile. Dr. Partykevich's study analyzes the course of that little-known but important episode in Ukrainian church history. [more]

 


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Christian Social Ethics in Ukraine: The Legacy of Andrei Sheptytsky (1997)
Andrii Krawchuk

Metropolitan Andrei Sheptytsky (1865-1944) headed the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Galicia for almost half a century. He was not only and outstanding ecclesiastical, cultural and civic leader, but also a thinker and writer of distinction. Grappling with the social and political problems that beset his religious community, Sheptytscky
applied key priciples of Christian social ethics to such issues as patriotism, inter-ethnic relations, church-state relations, the ideal of church unity, Soviet Communism, nationalism, religious liberty, ideological atheism, and Nazism.

Whether in pastoral letters that probed the Christian life through ethical reflection on social and political reality or in personal representations to such figures as Emperor Frances Joseph, Pope Pius X, Khrushchev, Hitler, and Stalin, Sheptytsky promoted a vision of human life that was grounded in the practical wisdoom of both Eastern and Western Christendom. [more]

Co-published with the Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian and with the Basilian Press.


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The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and the Soviet State, 1939-1950 (1996)
Bohdan Bociurkiw

The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and the Soviet State (1939-1950) is a pioneering study of the suppression of this Ukrainian church under Stalinist rule. The study takes into account all the most important publications on the subject. It is one of the first works in Ukrainian studies written after the collapse of the USSR that effectively bridges the Soviet and the non-Soviet corpus of source material. It draws on publications that have appeared in a great variety of religious, Ukrainian underground, Soviet and non-Soviet (especially emigre) journals, newspapers, propagandistic pamphlets and leaflets.

Much of the Soviet archival material from the Party and government (including KGB) repositories used by the author had been classified and was hitherto unknown to scholars and analysts. These sources have been supplemented by documents from ecclesiastical archives in Rome and Ukrainian church repositories in the West. Furthermore, the author has availed himself of a number of oral informants, both living and deceased, including victims and eyewitnesses of Soviet repressions against the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine, thereby including in his considerations vital insights that otherwise would not have been preserved. [more]


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Ukraine Between East and West: Essays on Cultural History to the Early Eighteenth Century (1996)
Ihor Sevcenko

Ukraine between East and West presents twelve essays by Ihor Sevcenk that explore the development of Ukrainian cultural identity under the disparate influences of the byzantine Empire and Western Europe (mediated through Poland). For Kyivan Rus', Byzantium was the source of the Christian religion, as well as of a highly developed literary and artistic culture that stimulated Kyiv's own achievements in these fields. The author shows how the prestige of Byzantine civilization was reinforced by the activities of Greek metropolitans of Kyiv, Byzantine emperors, religious missionaries and teachers of Greek, dominating the outlook of the Slavic elite during the Middle Ages. This civilization influenced Kyivan culture even after the fall of Constantinople to the Turks.

Sevcenko also analyses the impact of the Renaissance, Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Ukraine. The intellectual ferment of the era is captured in essays on the defense of the Orthodox faith and the religious polemical literature. The essay on Metropolitan Peter Mohyla examines the complex cultural world of this important churchman. [more]


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Church, Nation and State in Russia and Ukraine (1991)
Geoffrey A. Hosking

This unique collection of nineteen essays is the product of a conference held in July 1988 at the University of London, UK. By addressing a diverse number of religious issues in both historical and contemporary contexts, the authors seek to "correct an imbalance" that has crept into the scholarship of religion in Ukraine and Russia. These essays consider the role of the church in various social, political and state settings and include the formation of modern Ukrainian religious culture. This book sheds light on the background of the background of the religious revival in post-Soviet Ukraine and Russia. Essay titles include: The Formation of Modern Ukrainian Religious Culture The Spirituality of the Vyg Fathers The Authority of Holiness: Women Ascetics and Spiritual Elders The Greek Catholic Church in Nineteenth-century Galicia Printing the Bible in the Reign of Alexander I Christianity, the Service Ethic and Decembrist Thought The Role of the Orthodox Missionary in the Altai Theological Liberalism and Church Reform in Imperial Russia Alexander Kireev and Theological Controversy in the Russian Orthodox Church Leo Tolstoy, a Church Critic Influenced by Orthodox Thought The Church's Role in St. Petersburg, 1800-1914 The Church Schools and Seminaries in the Russian Revolution The Political Philosophy of the Russian Orthodox Episcopate in the Soviet Period and many others. [more]


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, 14-30 1921
(The First All-Ukrainian Council of the UAOC, 14-30 October 1921) (1991)

The publication of the proceedings of the first Council of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church, which was held in Kyiv in October 1921, contains the previously unpublished proceedings of the ecclesiastical council that laid the foundations for the independence (autocephaly) of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church from the Moscow Patriarchate.

The documents were discovered in the Kyiv archives after Ukraine became independent in 1991. They have now been published by the Church Studies Program in cooperation with the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Institute of Ukrainian Archeography and Source Studies and the Central State Archives of the Supreme Government Institutions of Ukraine. The volume was published just in time to be launched at this year's Fourth Congress of Ukrainian Studies in Odesa. [more]

The publication of the volume was made possible by the generous support of the Publications Fund of the Ukrainian Theological Faculty at St. Andrew's College in Winnipeg, St. John's Fraternal Society of Edmonton, the Edmonton Branch of the Ukrainian Self-Reliance Association and the Stephania Bukachevsky-Pastushenko Archival Fund at CIUS.


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About the Harrowing of Hell: A Seventeenth-Century Ukrainian Play in its European Context (1989)
Irena R. Makaryk, trans.

The seventeenth-century Ukrainian play About the Harrowing of Hell is probably the last European manifestation of an important medieval dramatic tradition. This edition features a detailed introduction and notes, a facsimile of the original (discovered by Ivan Franko), and an English translation.

In Western Europe, harrowing of hell plays are among the best extant medieval plays, offering many opportunities for the spectacular and the awesome, as well as the farcical. In Eastern Europe, which felt the reverberations of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, almost all at once, the drama is both numerically and qualitatively more slight. About the Harrowing of Hell is one outstanding example.

A full, contained, independent harrowing play from the early seventeenth century, About the Harrowing of Hell forms a nexus between Western and Eastern dramatic traditions and is probably the last manifestation of this genre anywhere in Europe. Unknown to all but the Slavic specialist, this text broadens the scope of what is generally regarded as medieval religious drama and reveals the curious changes wrought on a harrowing play by a complex period.[more]

Published in association with Dovehouse Editions ( Ottawa) in the series "Carleton Renaissance Plays in Translation".


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Morality and Reality: The Life and Times of Andrei Sheptyts'kyi (1989)
Paul Robert Magocsi, ed.

Andrei Sheptyts'kyi (18651944), metropolitan-archbishop of the Greek Catholic Church in Galicia, was a towering figure in twentieth-century Ukrainian life. This collection of twenty-one essays examines Metropolitan Sheptyts'kyi as church hierarch, theologian, ecumenist, national leader, and philanthropist.

The essays include:Wolfdieter Bihl: Sheptyts'kyi and the Austrian GovernmentJohn-Paul Himka: Sheptyts'kyi and the Ukrainian National Movement before 1914 Bohdan Budorowycz: Sheptyts'kyi and the Ukrainian National [more]

 

 


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