Publications

This is a brief list with links (where possible) to my publications and presentations. These materials also generate a high number of 'hits,' and I'm interested in what draws people to these pages, so I'll gladly take comments. Click here to email me.

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BOOKS | CHAPTERS & ARTICLES | CONFERENCE PAPERS | LECTURES | UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS


MONOGRAPHS & EDITIONS:

Gifford, James. Personal Modernisms: Anarchist Networks and the Later Avant-Gardes. Edmonton, AB. University of Alberta Press, 2014.

ABSTRACT: Gifford's invigorating work of metacriticism and literary history recovers the significance of the "lost generation" of writers of the 1930s and 1940s. He examines how the Personalism of anarcho-anti-authoritarian contemporaries such as Alex Comfort, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Durrell, J.F. Hendry, Henry Miller, Elizabeth Smart, Dylan Thomas, and Henry Treece forges a missing link between Late Modernist and postmodernist literature. He concludes by applying his recontextualization to four familiar texts by Miller, Durrell, Smart, and Duncan, and encourages readers to re-engage the lost generation using this new critical lens. Scholars and students of literary modernism, 20th century Canadian literature, and anarchism will find a productive vision of this neglected period within Personal Modernisms.

Durrell, Lawrence. From the Elephant's Back: Collected Essay & Travel Writings. Ed. James Gifford. Pref. Peter Baldwin. Edmonton, AB. University of Alberta Press, 2014.

ABSTRACT: Best known for his novels and travel writing, Lawrence Durrell defied easy classification within twentieth-century modernism. His antiauthoritarian tendencies put him at odds with many contemporaries -- aesthetically and politically. However, thanks to a compelling recontextualization by editor James Gifford, these 38 previously unpublished and out-of-print essays and letters reveal that Durrell's maturation as an artist was rich, complex, and subtle. This edition promises to open up new approaches to interpreting his more famous works.

Gifford, James, James M. Clawson, & Fiona Tomkinson. Eds. Archives & Networks of Modernism. Spec. issue of Global Review: A Biannual Special Topics Journal 1.1 (2013).

ABSTRACT: Archives & Networks of Modernism developed to address or collapse the plurality of Modernist and Late Modernist networks and archives. The collection instead adopts an international perspective, in particular where each network or archive intersects or interrupts the other. In this, it draws from the established tropes of the New Modernist Studies, but often moving through somewhat less established locales, methods, figures, or paradigms.

Gifford, James, Ozen Asik-Dizdar, & Constance Bygrave. Eds. Globalize, Identify, Transform. Suppl. issue 1 of Global Review: A Biannual Special Topics Journal 1 (2013).

ABSTRACT: In today's world, change is inevitable in the institutions that shape our identity in multiple roles. Under the influence of globalization, cultural values combine in unprecedented ways and question existing institutions, values, identities, and future expectations. This supplementary issue of Global Review collects a selective proceedings from the symposium held at Fairleigh Dickinson University, Vancouver, 16-17 May 2013.

Fletcher, Edward Taylor. The Lost Island: Atlantis. Intro & Notes. James Gifford. Engravings. Peter Lazarus. Mission: Horse Whisper Press, 2011.

ABSTRACT: This fine edition revives Fletcher's 1889 long poem The Lost Island, written in Victoria, British Columbia. Produced at the Barbarian Press and using rich illustrations from with wood engravings by Peter Lazarus, the poem retells the myth of Atlantis while combining diverse mythic traditions from India, Scandinavia, and Europe in a landscape that reflects the West Coast of Canada. This edition attempts to fulfill Archibald Lampman's call in his 1893 review: "Let us do honor to such a poet, who has maintained a reserve so fine and so unusual, who has run so far counter to the clamorous custom of his age as to live out a long life in the tranquil life of books, wisdom and poetry."

Wilde, Oscar. The Picture of Dorian Gray. Ed. & Intro. James Gifford. Victoria, BC: McPherson Library, University of Victoria, 2011. (download updated EPUB or PDF directly)

ABSTRACT: In 1890, Oscar Wilde published the first version of The Picture of Dorian Gray in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine. After vociferous public responses, Wilde completed his revisions, expanding the novel by half again and adding his now famous "Preface" for what, in 1891, became the standard version of the novel. This leaves readers with two distinct versions of this literary masterpiece. This edition uses the British edition of the often overlooked 1890 printing prior to Wilde's expansions and expurgations. It also fills a gap in student-oriented publications of The Picture of Dorian Gray by making the 1890 instantiation of the novel available for classroom use. As an entirely electronic edition, it encourages a blended learning environment that privileges the text's accessibility and portability -- students have access to a standard document with uniform pagination in a Portable Document Format as well as ePub formats for a range of mobile reading devices. The annotations to this edition generally assume an undergraduate reader without significant prior experience.

Stephanides, Theodore. Autumn Gleanings: Corfu Memoirs & Poems. Eds. Richard Pine, Lindsay Parker, James Gifford, & Anthony Hirst. Kerkyra: Durrell School of Corfu, 2011.

ABSTRACT: Theodore Stephanides was a polymath. He had an international reputation as a scientist (he was a medical doctor, a naturalist and an astronomer), but he was also a poet and a translator. Stephanides was born in India, but came to Corfu with his family as a child, and it was there, many years later, that he encountered the Durrell family, who moved to Corfu in 1935. Complete for the first time in Autumn Gleanings are Stephanides' memoirs of his meetings with Lawrence Durrell in Corfu, Athens and Egypt, in the years 1935-44, together with his last (and hitherto unpublished) collection of poems. Both the memoirs and the poems are, by turns, witty, perceptive, erudite and compassionate.

Durrell, Lawrence. Panic Spring: A Romance. Ed. & Pref. James Gifford. Intro. Richard Pine. Victoria, BC: ELS Editions, 2008.

ABSTRACT: First published in 1937, two years after Durrell took up residence on the Greek island Kerkyra, Panic Spring broke with the realist tradition in 1930s novels and shows the young author's first attempts to extend High Modernist innovations in rural and personal landscapes. Cubist, surrealist, and imagist techniques merge with rural life and the peasant village that an international group of expatriates are led to by a curiously Pan-like boatman. Unavailable for seven decades, this new edition of Panic Spring shows Durrell's emerging passion for Mediterranean life and the Greek world as well as his first attempts to articulate a political-aesthetic direction distinct from his peers, George Orwell and W.H. Auden. Under the shadow of financial and political ruin, on the verge of revolution and war, the one chance summer depicted in Panic Spring will make readers reconsider the impetus and interests behind Durrell's late modernist masterpieces, The Alexandria Quartet, The Black Book, and Prospero's Cell.

Durrell, Lawrence. Pied Piper of Lovers. Ed. & Intro. James Gifford. Victoria, BC: ELS Editions, 2008.

ABSTRACT: Durrell's first novel, Pied Piper of Lovers, was published in 1935, shortly after he left England to live abroad until his death in 1990. As an autobiographical Künstlerroman, it traces Walsh Clifton's Anglo-Indian childhood and his struggles to negotiate a life between "mother" India and "father" England. The trauma of leaving India for an alien home propels the novel's concerns with colonial life and its wounds, transitioning from an idyllic rural world to London and Bloomsbury in the 1920s. Pied Piper of Lovers draws keenly from Durrell's own life and charts the emotional experiences that would drive the rest of his career. For these reasons, Durrell never allowed republication, and the novel was largely lost in the London Blitz. Pied Piper of Lovers prompts significant reconsideration of the impetus and political tensions behind Durrell's late modernist masterpieces, The Alexandria Quartet, The Avignon Quintet, and Bitter Lemons. This new edition allows readers to reevaluate Durrell's complex role as a colonial writer in a postcolonial world by emphasizing his irony, privileges, and bitterness for a life always lived in-between.

Miller, Henry & Herbert Read. The Henry Miller-Herbert Read Letters: 1935-58. Ed. James Gifford. Ann Arbor: Roger Jackson, Inc., 2007.

ABSTRACT: This book collects the correspondence between Herbert Read and Henry Miller, ancillary writings by Read, and my extensive critical revision to the development and ideological underpinning of Anglo-American Surrealism. I also reconstruct the literary network that developed around both authors before and in the wake of the 1936 London International Surrealist Exhibition. Ancillary materials include Read's related poetry The End of A War and his critical work on Miller.

Gifford, James & Gabrielle Zezulka-Mailloux. Eds. Culture and the State: Landscape and Ecology. Vol 1. Edmonton: CRC Humanities Studio, 2004. 248 pp.

ABSTRACT: In 1989 some proclaimed the imminent universal triumph of a particular state form -- the modern liberal state. Since then, others proclaim the imminent demise of the modern nation state under advancing globalization. Yet modern states continue to be formed -- from the former Yugoslavia to the new East Timor. One thing is clear in these developments. Despite the global promotion of science and commerce, culture in various forms had and has a major if not central role in state formation, from ancient times to the present. The four volumes of Culture and the State address all these issues, and more. Organized around a set of flexible themes, the series considers the role of culture variously defined -- high and low, elite and popular, local and global, historical and contemporary -- in the creation, maintenance, transformation, and demise of states.


---. Eds. Culture and the State: Disability Studies and Indigenous Studies. Vol 2. Edmonton: CRC Humanities Studio, 2004. 238 pp.



---. Eds. Culture and the State: Nationalisms. Vol. 3. Edmonton: CRC Humanities Studio, 2004. 279 pp.



---. Culture and the State: Alternative Interventions. Vol 4. Edmonton: CRC Humanities Studio, 2004. 278 pp.



Gifford, James, ed. Lawrence Durrell, Text, Hypertext, Intertext. Spec. issue of Agora: An Online Graduate Journal 3.1 (2004).

ABSTRACT: Durrell occupies a diverse liminal positions in the canon of twentieth-century literature. A British author, he was born in India to parents who had never been on the British Isles, and as a consequence was denied the right to enter or settle, though he resided in Britain for over a decade and held positions in the Foreign Office during and following World War II. In a similar pattern, his oeuvre exists 'in-between' schools and movements: he is neither as direct an author as Henry Miller nor as controlled as T. S. Eliot, both of whom were major correspondents and influences; his works are known as both surrealist and realist; and as a modernist, his texts consistently anticipate effects and sensibilities associated with the postmodern. In this collection, a number of new perspectives on Durrell's works appear.

BOOK CHAPTERS & ARTICLES:

Gifford, James. "Late Modernism's Migrations: The San Francisco Renaissance, Egyptian Anarchists, & English Surrealists." Textual Practice 28 (2014): in press.

---. "From Booster to Bolero: Post-Surrealism & Apocalyptic Anarchism." Anarchism. Ed. Allan Antliff. Journal of Modern Periodical Studies 4.2 (2013): 270-298.

---. "The Personal Landscape & New Apocalypse Networks: Philhellenic, Anarchist, & Surrealist Late Modernisms." Archives & Networks of Modernism. Eds. James Gifford, James M. Clawson, & Fiona Tomkinson. Global Review: A Biannual Special Topics Journal 1.1 (2013): 75-104.

---. "Productive Disappointment: The Modern University and Authority." Globalize, Identify, Transform. Eds. James Gifford, Ozen Asik-Dizdar, & Constance Bygrave. Suppl. issue 1 of Global Review: A Biannual Special Topics Journal 1 (2013): 1-14.

Parker, Lindsay and James Gifford. "Rethinking How Humanities Think: Daring and 'do / make / think'." ESC: English Studies in Canada 38.1 (2012): 89-113.

ABSTRACT: Whether the administrative organization of people in the humanities takes the form of a department of English, philosophy, his-tory, or comparative literature, etc., in the modern university, humanistic disciplines continue to reflect the institution in which they reside, even as that institution submits them to "two cultures," "science wars," or corporatization. Neither disciplinary distinctiveness, group identity, nor solidarity within the humanities as a division protect these forms of inquiry and exchange against dominant institutional imperatives and incursions. Asa traditional container for academic activity, departments contribute to what is increasingly becoming a black box nexus of activity around the individual players: the black box being a reduction of a complex process to simply its inputs and outputs with the box around process itself..

Gifford, James. "'The world's extremest borne': West Coast Landscapes and the Poetic Works of Edward Taylor Fletcher." Canadian Literature: A Quarterly of Criticism and Review 213 (Summer 2012): 193-202.

ABSTRACT: Edward Taylor Fletcher is a nearly forgotten nineteenth-century Canadian poet, philologist, and travel writer whose poetic voice was defined by his experiences in Western Canada. His focus on distinctly Western landscapes in his later works anticipates several movements in the arts in Canada that followed. This article elucidates Fletcher's too-long neglected instantiation of this transplantation, not translation, of international poetic materials into distinctly Canadian landscapes.

---. "Poetic Text, Music Text: Competing Nationalist Styles in Restoration Opera." Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: A Journal of Criticism and Theory 14.1 (Spring 2012): 21-37.

ABSTRACT: Within the complex interaction between stage practices, politics, literary production, and musical composition, this article traces the relationship between Restoration libretti and musical scores by emphasizing their nationalist interests, leading to the proposition that musical form can reflect or resist the allegorical political interests of libretti, even to the point of subverting the dramatic text. By moving across these materials, I argue for a necessarily interdisciplinary approach to musical theater of this period, one that emphasizes the combination of the musical and dramatic texts to form the operatic work as a whole.

---. "A Report on the University in Canada." Inquire: Journal of Comparative Literature 1.1 (2011): n.pag.

ABSTRACT: We teach, conduct research and fulfill our professional service during a time when the idea of a university is transitioning from a space to a series of relations or reputations and from a means of recreating particular national cultures to a mechanism in the economic process of globalization. To the extent that such 'spaces' have traditionally been predicated on exclusionary and imperialist cultures, so much the better. However, insofar as the emergence of a new type of university marks the imposition of new forms of cultural hegemony and effaces cooperative thought and action, so much the worse. I am left asking what does the phrase 'a real university' mean, and perhaps more importantly, how does it mean?

---. "Real and Unreal Cities: The Modernist Origins of Durrell's Alexandria." Durrell and the City: Reconstructing the Urban Landscape. Ed. Donald P. Kaczvinsky. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2011. 13-29.

ABSTRACT: The striking disjunction between scholarly readings of Lawrence Durrell's 'city novels' and more general scholarly readings of the discursive trope of the 'city' in modernist fiction points to a productive dialogism involving late modernist reconfigurations of his modernist origins. And there is good reason. The tension between Durrell's trope of the city and the city in modernist studies is striking, and I contend it reflects his shifting late modernist discomfort with his predecessors.

---. "Anarchist Transformations of English Surrealism: The Villa Seurat Network." jml: Journal of Modern Literature 33.4 (Summer 2010): 57-71.

ABSTRACT: This article traces the Villa Seurat's literary network and its neglected anarchist background in Henry Miller's influence and Lawrence Durrell's unrecognized anarchist affiliations. Miller and Durrell influenced an anarchist revision of the socialist and communist orthodoxy of Surrealism. Their anarchist views, which retained surrealist aesthetics, played a major role in the international development of English language Surrealism prior to and during World War II. It had an impact on poets as diverse as David Gascoyne, Henry Treece, Robert Duncan and Kenneth Rexroth.

Gifford, James and Michael Stevens. "A Variant of Lawrence Durrell's Livia; or, Buried Alive & the Composition of Monsieur; or, the Prince of Darkness." Lawrence Durrell at the Crossroads of Arts and Sciences. Eds. Corinne Alexandre-Garner, Isabelle Keller-Privat, & Murielle Philippe. Paris: Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest, 2010. 173-193.

ABSTRACT: We propose an alternative reading of the sequential construction of Lawrence Durrell's The Avignon Quintet. The form only became clear as he prepared the first volume, Monsieur; or, the Prince of Darkness, for publication. By contrasting the published variant of Livia; or, Buried Alive, we draw attention to Durrell's structural preoccupations. By tracing the publication history of the first two volumes of The Avignon Quintet and the published variant, "Gog and Magog", we demonstrate that the spiritual, Gnostic thematic content develops from overt formal and theoretical concerns that Durrell articulated in his early variants.

Gifford, James. "Vassanji's Toronto and Durrell's Alexandria: The View from Across?" Indian Writers: Transnationalisms and Diasporas. Eds. Jaspal K. Singh & Rajendra Chetty. Postcolonial Studies 5. New York: Peter Lang, 2010. 171-182.

---. "Noses in The Alexandria Quartet: Groddeck and Stekel in Durrell." Deus Loci: The Lawrence Durrell Journal 11 (2009): 150-154. (reprint)

---. "The Poets of The Booster, Delta, and Seven, 1937-40: Recuperating Literary Networks." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews 22.3 (2009): 42-47.

---. "Reading Miller's 'Numinous Cock': Heterosexist Presumption and Queerings of the Censored Text." ESC: English Studies in Canada 34.2-3 (2008): 49-70.

---. "Vassanji's Toronto and Durrell's Alexandria: The View from Across or the View from Beside?" The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies 15.2 (2008): 28-43.

---. "Surrealism's Anglo-American Afterlife: The Herbert Read and Henry Miller Network." Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal 5 (2008): 36-64.

Miller, Henry. "Henry Miller's Letters to Herbert Read: 1935-1958." Ed. James Gifford. Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal 5 (2008): 3-35.

Gifford, James & Steve Osadetz. "Le Gnosticisme dans Monsieur de Lawrence Durrell: Nouvelles Preuves." Hommage ô Jacques Lacarrière: Durrell et Lacarrière rencontre au bord du Styx. Eds. Corinne Alexandre-Garner and Christiane Séris. Nanterre: Presses Universitaires de Paris X, 2008. 117-128.

Gifford, James. "Men, Masculinities, and Music." Routledge International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities. Eds. Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, Keith Pringle. Oxford: Routledge, 2007. Long entry.

---. "Masculinities and the Novel." Routledge International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities. Eds. Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, Keith Pringle. Oxford: Routledge, 2007. Long entry.

---. "Infidelity and Cheating." Routledge International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities. Eds. Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, Keith Pringle. Oxford: Routledge, 2007. Short entry.

---. "Men, Masculinities, and Bisexuality." Routledge International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities. Eds. Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, Keith Pringle. Oxford: Routledge, 2007. Short entry.

---. "Hellenism/Modernism: Negotiating Modernisms and the Philhellene in Greece." Ed. Tatiani Rapatzikou. Anglo-American Perceptions of Hellenism. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2006. 82-97.

---. "Review: Incest: A New Perspective. Mary Hamer." Requested review for In-between: Studies in Literary Criticism. in press.

---. "'The sealed book of the future': Edward Taylor Fletcher's Poetic, Political, and Poly-lingual Canada, 1827-97." Eds. Aloys Fleischmann and Nancy Van Styvendale. Proceedings of Narratives of Citizenship. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 1 September 2007.

ABSTRACT: This paper develops out of my current project to reprint the collected works of Edward Taylor Fletcher and to prepare a digital edition of his commonplace books. I give an overview of Fletcher, his works, and his importance, followed by a contextualization of his value to current notions of Canadian identity where multiple, overlapping, and contradictory narratives reflect an unstable subject.
PODCAST: here. (.m4v)

---. "Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet and Colonial Knowing: Implicating Friedrich Nietzsche and Edward Said." Lawrence Durrell Borderlands and Borderlines. Ed. Corinne Alexandre-Garner. Confluences. XXVI. Paris: Publidix l'Université Paris X, 2005. 95-112.

ABSTRACT: Ce papier se dispute pour l'importance d'intérêt de Lawrence Durrell dans Friedrich Nietzsche aux lectures de postcolonial de ses romans par les arguments de Edward Said dans Orientalism. En particulier, les epistemologies de Nietzsche et sa discussion de l'erreur du monde vrai contre le monde apparent perdent la nouvelle lumière sur les lectures de position de Durrell comme un colonial dans Le Quatuor d'Alexandrie.
:::: This paper argues for the importance of Lawrence Durrell's interest in Friedrich Nietzsche to postcolonial readings of his novels through Edward Said's arguments in Orientalism. In particular, Nietzsche's epistemological arguments and his discussion of the error of the real versus the apparent world sheds new light on readings of Durrell's position as a colonial in The Alexandria Quartet.

---. "Women's Words on Reading." WWR Magazine 1.1 (2005): 15. From an interview with Kate Braid.

---."Delta and Dylan Thomas' 'Prologue to an Adventure.'" In-between: Studies in Literary Criticism 13.1 (2004): 19-23.

ABSTRACT: In 1939, Keidrych Rhys charged that Dylan Thomas' "Prologue to an Adventure" was reprinted "in Delta (Paris) without acknowledgement... without permission"; however, Ralph Maud contrarily argues "Durrell, as editor of Delta, asked Thomas for contributions and published something by him in all three issues" (123). Thomas' letters support the latter position and suggest he returned to the story for Delta, aiming for publication in a book project through the Obelisk Press in Paris. Hence, this later printing indicates his final intentions. This challenges the authoritative editions of Thomas, works, and I argue for a corrected edition of "Prologue to an Adventure" based on the Delta printing.

---. "'Convinced of the dead certainty of death': Henry Miller's Tropic of Capricorn and the Nexus of Fear and Violence.” Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal 2 (2004): 106-118.

---. "Introduction: Culture and the State." Culture and the State: Landscape and Ecology. Vol. 1. Edmonton, AB: Canadian Research Chair Studio, 2004. 7-9.

---. "'CORFU LANDSCAPES Real & Imaginary': This Rough Colonialism that Bonds Space to Popular Culture." Culture and the State: Landscape and Ecology. Vol. 1. Edmonton, AB: CRC Studio, 2004. 25-37.

---. "Terror Management Theory and Literature: Reading Social Identity, Self-Esteem, and Fear." Culture and the State: Alternative Interventions. Vol. 4. Edmonton, AB: CRC Studio, 2004. 212-224.

---. "Introduction: Lawrence Durrell, Text, Hypertext, Intertext." Agora: Online Graduate Journal 3.1 (2004): 1-3.

--- & Steve Osadetz. "Gnosticism in Lawrence Durrell's Monsieur: New Textual Evidence for Source Materials." Agora: Online Graduate Journal 3.1 (2004): 1-8.

ABSTRACT: Previous scholarship on source materials for Lawrence Durrell's Gnostic themes in Monsieur are insufficient in light of his marginalia in Serge Hutin's Les Gnostique and his notebooks for the novel. We contend that archival evidence from the Bibliothèque Lawrence Durrell in Nanterre, France, necessitates a reevaluation of previous work in order to account for the combination of Hutin's approach to Gnosticism and newspaper clippings in the notebook, which recast the nature of the Gnostic suicide cult that provides the impetus for the plot of the novel.

Gifford, James. "Noses in The Alexandria Quartet." Notes on Contemporary Literature 34.1 (2004): 2-4.

ABSTRACT: I detail the close textual relationship between between Semira's reconstructed nose in Durrell's The Alexandria Quartet and passages from Georg Groddeck's The Undiscovered Self that are emphasized by Durrell's marginalia in the Durrell collection at the University of Victoria's McPherson Library. I argue for Groddeck as source materials and suggest its thematic significance.

---. "Durrell's Revolt of Aphrodite: Nietzschean Influences." Mosaic: A Journal For the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 36.2 (2003): 111-127.

ABSTRACT: The Revolt of Aphrodite is often considered an aberration in Durrell's career, its scholarship insufficient compared to the Alexandria Quartet and Avignon Quintet. I contend something different: that Nietzsche's writings inform Durrell's work, and that the Revolt makes significant contributions to both Durrell's oeuvre and modernist debates.

---. "What is Zizek so Afraid Of? Exemplification Against the Existential Hordes." j_spot: Journal of Social and Political Thought 2.2 (2003): n.pag

ABSTRACT: This paper reads Zizek's works in contrast to materials drawn from Existential Analysis and Terror Management Theory. I assert that Zizek's writings are troubled by the problematic use of terms like "obversion" and "paradox," as well as his resistance to notions of anxiety developed in Existential Analysis and the empiric work of Terror Management Theory.

---. "Annaud's Enemy at the Gates: 'Die Schreckenspforten, die Not und Tod'." Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness: An Inter-Disciplinary and Multi-Disciplinary Journal 1.3 (2003): 59-81.

ABSTRACT: Based on the argument that foreknowledge of one's personal death is intrinsic in self-consciousness and that instinctual fear of a threat becomes death anxiety in the context of this foreknowledge, Terror Management Theory differs from familiar psychological and psychoanalytic modes of reading in the Humanities. I focus on the relationship between fear, anxiety, derogation of difference, and symbolic means to repressing or overcoming the inevitability of death through processes identification and projection. Annaud's film Enemy at the Gates is my focus for exampling the Terror Management paradigm and in the second half of the paper I read the film to highlight distinctions between the method I propose and those that are more generally accepted in the Humanities.

---. "The Corfiot Landscape and Lawrence Durrell's Pilgrimage: The Colonial Palimpsest in 'Oil for the Saint; Return to Corfu.'" In-between: Essays in Literary Criticism 11.2 (2002): 181-196.

ABSTRACT: Few landscapes have as overt a colonial influence as Corfu, which offers up a cosmopolitan palimpsest of urban landscapes to countless tourists every year. Its overlaying of histories, cultures, architectures, and even personal experiences is the crux of Durrell's pilgrimage tale, "Oil for the Saint." I suggest that Durrell, as the 'returning native,' subverts the colonial mindset that allows him to define and delineate a foreign landscape for foreign readers, while nonetheless engaging in an attempt at reconciliation—a pilgrimage quite literally—between his various adopted 'homes.' Durrell 'dupes' the trusting reader into a series of logical fallacies and material misconceptions. Therefore, the text subverts the reader's easy acceptance of the travel narrative and leaves the reader with an uncanny perception of himself or herself mirrored in the foreign 'deus loci.'

---. "Hellenism Between Orient and Occident?" In-between: Essays in Literary Criticism 11.1 (2002): 115-124.

ABSTRACT: This is a full-length review article focussed on David Roessel's In Byron's Shadow and commenting on its place in postcolonial criticism, but also reviewing Edmund Keeley's Inventing Paradise and Ian MacNiven's Lawrence Durrell: A Biography.

---. "Extravagant Strangers and Durrell In Anthologies" Deus Loci: The Lawrence Durrell Journal NS 8 (2001-2002): 231-233.

ABSTRACT: This is a combination of a Note on minor publications by Lawrence Durrell and a Review of Caryl Phillips' anthology Extravagant Strangers.

---. "Homoerotic Anxiety and the East/West Dialectic in Lawrence Durrell's Monsieur." Torquere: Journal of the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Studies Association 5 (2004): in press. (18pp.)

ABSTRACT: I detail the relationship between queer sexualities and the ambiguity of identities in general in Durrell's Monsieur. I argue that the homoerotic elements of Durrell's text, and his destabilizing of such distcrete categories as well as the social anxieties surrounding same-sex object choice, mirror his more generalized blurring of dialectical structures with regard to identities: East/West, straight/queer, Self/Other, and so forth.

---. "Editorial." Agora: Online Graduate Humanities Journal. 1.3 (2002). n.pag.

van Woudenberg, Maximiliaan and James Gifford. "Editorial." Agora: Online Graduate Humanities Journal. 1.2 (2001). n.pag.

Gifford, James. "The Phenomenology of Death: Considering Otto Rank, Ernest Becker And Herbert Marcuse In Lawrence Durrell's Avignon Quintet." Lawrence Durrell Revisited : Lawrence Durrell revisité. Ed. Corinne Alexandre-Garner. Confluences. XXI. Nanterre, France: l'Université Paris X Nanterre, 2002. 13-38.

ABSTRACT: Death and dying are prevalent throughout Durrell's oeuvre, and perhaps nowhere more emphatically than in Monsieur. Despite its recurrence and thematic significance, death remains a mysterious question hanging over Durrell's fictions, distanced from the knowable by an uncertainty that keeps both the dead and the living from a 'direct apprehension' of death or the hyper-reality of it. In conjunction with this uncertainty, the lingering influence of Otto Rank can be detected in the trauma associated with the existential incompatibility that death is shrouded in, as well as the varying methods that Durrell presents for psychologically repressing this trauma.

---. "Death and Djuna Barnes." nasty 11 (2002), <http://www.nasty.cx>.

Djuna Barnes and Otto Rank shared Paris in the 1930's, and from this link in both time and place, I suggest that their works contain a shared preoccupation with the inter-related themes of the cognizance of mortality, human sexuality and metaphysical speculation. Rank -- like Barnes -- was deeply involved in the salon and arts community in Paris from 1926 to 1935 through both his own practice and the salon of the analyst Rene Allendy. Moreover, reading Nightwood via Rankian analysis gives a theoretical justification for the intimately interlocked question of the 'night' with the sexual and mortal preoccupations of Barnes' novel. I will go forward under the assumption that this reading is appropriate, either for as yet uncertain, but possible, biographical reasons, and under the more general suggestion that a psychoanalytic and existential focus applies equally well to the preoccupations of the artwork as it does to the preoccupations of individuals.

---. "Forgetting A Homeless Colonial: Gender, Religion and Transnational Childhood in Lawrence Durrell's Pied Piper Of Lovers." Jouvert: A Journal of Postcolonial Studies 6.1-2 (2001): n.pag. Online. <http://152.1.96.5/jouvert/>.

ABSTRACT: Lawrence Durrell's works occupy an uncertain canonic status in Postcolonial Literature, most often read as the dying breath of Empire gazing at the exotic Middle and Far East, but also arguably among the most complex renderings of the problems of representation, homelessness and national identity. Eagleton assures the reader that Durrell's novels comprise "a monument of fake exoticism and pseudo-profundity" (Eagleton n.pag) and moreover that Durrell "carved himself a literary colony out of Alexandria" (Eagleton). In opposition stands Caryl Phillips, who acknowledges that Durrell's "expatriate status greatly influenced his work" ("London" 88). Ian MacNiven takes the same stance, contending “the lonely colonial child shadowed the cosmopolitan writer" (A Biography xvii). Noteably, Phillips is referring to Durrell's first novel, Pied Piper Of Lovers (1935), while Eagleton is referring to the much later Alexandria Quartet (1957-60); the first work is largely autobiographical and as a juvenile work it reveals its theoretical apparatus quite easily, while the later quartet is emphatically not biographical and refuses to render its theoretical agenda at a superficial level of reading. This article will address Durrell's first novel, including the problem of Durrell as both author and autobiographical subject in the work, while keeping issues of colonialism and the idea of 'home' at the forefront; however, I do this with an intent to more generally address how a superficial reading of Durrell's works can misrepresent their careful and nuanced approach to transience, home and Empire within the broader context of human frailties and fears.

---. "Editorial." Agora: Online Graduate Humanities Journal. 1.1 (2001). n.pag.

---. "Foucault's Dialectic of 'Madness' in Durrell's Zero and Asylum In The Snow: The Liberations of Helplessness And The Restrictions of Freedom." Deus Loci: Journal of the International Lawrence Durrell Society 7 (1999-2000): 70-92.

ABSTRACT: Prior to The Black Book, Lawrence Durrell wrote a pair of 'short stories' that, along with some of his poetry, claim a unique place in the canon. Anticipating features of Michel Foucault's Madness and Civilization, Durrell creates a fictional space where ideas of the constructed nature of both the rebelled against and the rebelling are fixed in the trap where, even if artistic rebellion succeeds in creating new fiction spaces that alter social constructions, such rebellion must continue without any consideration of a 'perfect' goal. Durrell's primary technique in the story pair is a deconstruction of the alterity of madness and an examination of its kinship to the creative act as an instance of rebellion.

---. "Nietzsche, Phenomenology and the Psychology of Mortality: Influences on Rank and Differences in Patocka, With a Musing on Plato." Fait Accomplit: Literary Journal. Winter (2000): 34-52.

ABSTRACT: Throughout his works, Friedrich Nietzsche contends with the Cartesian dualism. The error of this dualistic division of mind from body is -- in Nietzsche's presentation -- an aspect of the confusion of cause and consequence, and plays a central role in his reworking of the false dualism of the 'real' and 'apparent' worlds. Jan Patocka continues to develop Nietzsche's model by furthering questions on the nature of self-observation within a Heideggerian sense of being and manifestation of the world. In doing so, Patocka exposes a conflict -- and a hidden complimentarity in his own work -- with Cartesian mentalism and the extension of these questions to the social realm; all these are areas that Nietzsche likewise explored, but which are granted a twentieth century framework in Patocka's Heretical Essays, in conflict with Nietzsche. It is the hidden complementarity between Patocka's 'man in the world' stance and the Cartesian division of mind from body or man from world (which potentially follows as a necessary derivative of Patocka's stance) that is opposed to Nietzsche's model.

---. Epistemological Skepticism In The Novels Of Lawrence Durrell: A Study In The Development Of Postmodern Fiction And Its Subsequent Effects On Analytic Methodologies. Thes. California State University Dominguez Hills, 2000. Ann Arbour: UMI, 2000. ordering information: available in PDF, unbound, paper bound & hardcover. Printable visual image of the first 24 pages].

Supervisor: Thomas Giannotti. Committee: Thomas Giannotti,Joanne Zitelli, and Donald Lewis. ABSTRACT: In Lawrence Durrell's novels a development toward epistemological skepticism is traced, leading to a reconsideration of the formative elements of Durrell's fictions and his currently nominal place in the twentieth-century literary canon. This development furthers the literary environment of modernism, and is anticipatory of major elements of postmodernism: primarily metafiction, intertextuality, deconstruction, and multiplicity. Consequent of the vantage of epistemological skepticism, postmodernism is redefined for both Durrell's fictions, and potentially twentieth century literature in general. Subsequently, current critical ideologies need to be reevaluated within this context. These ideologies are primarily post-colonialism, post-structuralism, deconstructionism, and archetypal criticism. This study will use original works by Durrell, critical interpretations of such, and works of current critical theory. Results will be presented in two sections; (1) a tracing of the development of epistemological skepticism in Durrell's novels, and (2) an example of the reevaluation of current critical models in view of this perspective.

---. "Reading Orientalism and the Crisis of Epistemology in the Novels of Lawrence Durrell." Comparative Literature and Culture 1.2 (Jul 1999). Online. <http://clcwebjournal.lib.purdue.edu/>. West Lafayette: Purdue University Press, 1999.

Abstract: In his article, "Reading Orientalism and the Crisis of Epistemology in the Novels of Lawrence Durrell," James Gifford argues that Edward Said's Orientalism has had a far-reaching impact on the study of literature as well as in Comparative Literature, especially in works that depict the "Eastern Other." However, a question arises in those texts that have completed the philosophical motion from existentialism to epistemological skepticism such as the novels of Lawrence Durrell. For example, in The Avignon Quintet a provisional and even counterfactual form of knowledge becomes central and obvious to the reader. Subsequently, knowledge of the Other becomes deflated, and a poor means of defining. The Other -- all that is not the Self -- becomes universalized as the text reveals that (mis)perceptions of the Other are more of a reflection of the Self than they are a truthful depiction of any absolute reality. Acknowledgment of the artifice of art leads to a surrendering of the artist's power to communicate any body of knowledge. In Monsieur, Durrell's forceful realization of the fiction of his work, and constant dissolution of any knowledge it may be communicating is a potential confounding of the knowledge/power relationship in the East/West or Other/Self dialectic. As these theoretical elements serve an important role in Comparative Literature, a further redefining of them in general would be of value to their use in more specific circumstances.

Melnyk, Lubomyr and Max Tell (Robert Stelmach). Spider Tiny's Christmas. ed. James Gifford. Langley, BC: Privately Printed, 1995.

This is a transcription into a performance score of rough notes and recordings of Robert Stelmach's and Lubomyr Melnyk's work for children. In addition, this transcription involved much musical editing and arrangement of parts for solo piano and speaker. This was both a textual and musical project, funded by Canada Council Grants.

Haywood, Eliza. The Female Spectator: Book XIII. ed. James Gifford. Burnaby, BC: Department of English, Simon Fraser University, 1994.

This is a reprint of one issue of Eliza Haywood's famous 18th Century periodical, transcribed from an original, but modernized in much of the spelling and with minor footnotes. This project was supervised by Betty Schellenberg of the Simon Fraser University Department of English.

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CONFERENCE & SYMPOSIUM PAPERS:

Gifford, James. "1930s Cairo + 1940s California: Public Poetics and Private Polemics in International Literary Networks." American Circuits, American Secrets. Canadian Association for American Studies. University of Alberta. Banff, AB. 18-21 September 2014.

---. "Multinational Distance Education & Copyright: Digitization, Fair Use, & Course Material in Asynchronous Online Courses." ABC Copyright Conference. Alberta & British Columbia Copyright Group. Camosun College & University of Victoria. Victoria, BC. 26-27 May 2014.

---. "Fragmentation, Parataxis, & Materialism: The Late Cultural Logics of Revolt." Durrell & Place: Translation, Migration, Location. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver, BC. 14- 17 May 2014.

---. "'Per omnia saecula saeculorum' or 'Inkaba yakho iphi?': Indigeneity in Alex La Guma and Aidan Higgins" Vancouver Research Symposium. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver, BC. 28 March 2014.

---. "The Elephant Writes Back: Reconciliations Among Orwell's Gun, Anand's Bar, and Durrell's Chutney." 42nd Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 20-22 February 2014.

---. "Anarchist Surrealism & Canadian Apocalyptic Modernism." NAASN 5. North American Anarchist Studies Network. Kwantlen Polytechnic University. Surrey, BC. 16-18 January 2014.

---. "Elizabeth Smart & Canadian Apocalyptic Modernisms." Research in the Interdisciplinary World. Athabasca University. Athabasca, AB. 4 October 2013.

---. "Verdi & Politics." Viva Verdi! Celebrating the Art of Giuseppe Verdi. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver, BC. 17 September 2013.

---. "Reinventing Tradition: The Edwardians Under Our Eyes." Contemporary Reflections. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver, BC. 14 September 2013.

---. "Productive Disappointment: The Modern University & Authority." Globalize, Identify, Transform: A Symposium. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver, BC. 16-17 May 2013.

---. "Transforming/Translating New Westminster in E.T. Fletcher's Long Poems: Literary Communities of the 1890s." BC Studies 2013. Douglas College. New Westminster, BC. 2-4 May 2013.

---. "Robert Duncan's 'Ark': The San Francisco Renaissance and English Surrealism's Apocalypse." 41st Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 21-23 February 2013.

---. "Harlem Blossoms: The Harlem Renaissance." Contemporary Reflections. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver, BC. 16 February 2013.

---. "Digital Humanities & Personal Modernisms." Humanities Research Forum. Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences. Athabasca University. Athabasca. 30 November 2012.

---. "Belated Modernisms: Anarcho-Surrealism & the Apocalyptic Novels of Late Modernism." Modernity, Ideology, & the Novel. Institute for the Humanities. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver. 25-27 October 2012.

---. "The (Afro-)Anglo-Irish: Aidan Higgins' Irish Ascendancy & Afrikaners." Crossing Boundaries III. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver. 10 September 2012.

---. "Durrell's Long Shadow from Cairo to California: English Surrealisms and the Cult of Sex & Anarchy." Durrell 2012: The Lawrence Durrell Centenary. Goodenough College & The British Library. London. 13-16 June 2012.

---. "From Albert Cossery to Robert Duncan: Durrell as Intermediary." 40th Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 23-25 February 2012.

---. "The San Francisco Renaissance, Egyptian Anarchists, and English Surrealists: Late Modernism's Migrations." Department Colloquium. Simon Fraser University, Department of English. Burnaby, BC. 25 November 2011.

---. "George Leite's Circle & George Henein's Network: Anglo-Hellenic Stopovers for Egyptian Radical Art." Crossing Boundaries II: Culture, Technology, & Economics. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver, BC. 26 October 2011.

---. "Anarchist Surrealism: From Cairo to California." MSA 13: The Structures of Innovation. Modernist Studies Association. SUNY Buffalo. Buffalo, NY. 6-9 October 2011. (seminar paper)

---. "Canadian Landscapes in Fletcher's Poetry and Translations: 1867-92." Faculty of Arts & Sciences Research Series. Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB. 20 May 2011.

---. "Late Modernist Philhellenism: Transplanting Poetic Modernisms through Translation." World Literature, Comparative Literature. American Comparative Literature Association. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver, BC. 31 March Ð 3 April 2011.

---. "Peddling Pulp: The Industrial Production of Popular Culture." Saturday Forum. Simon Fraser University. Vancouver, BC. 19 March, 2011.

ABSTRACT: Industrially produced culture is ubiquitous; it is in our homes, on our airwaves, and around us at all times. Yet, we rarely think about what and how it means or even how we consume it. Does mass production limit what it can express? Can we think outside of its scope? Does it provide what we want or teach us how to want? Even our folk culture and local communities now echo pulp culture. This forum considers the structure and form of these materials in order to ask how we interact with pulp in daily life and whether mass production renders it interchangeable. We will draw examples from popular culture in a variety of media from the 20th century.
PODCAST: here (.mp3).

---. "Aidan Higgins' Shifting Landscapes: Locating the Anglo-Irish and the Afrikaners." 39th Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 19-21 February 2011.

---. "Death and Analysis: The Terror Management Paradigm and Mansfield's 'The Wrong House'." MSA 12: Modernist Networks. Modernist Studies Association. University of Victoria. Victoria, BC. 11-14 November 2010. (seminar paper)

---. "Swift Messages: Anarcho-Surrealist Networks in Europe and the Americas, 1935-45." MSA 12: Modernist Networks. Modernist Studies Association. University of Victoria. Victoria, BC. 11-14 November 2010.

---. "Remediation and V for Vendetta: The Case for Bibliographical Cultural Studies." Lunch 'n Learn. Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB. 29 September 2010.

---."Remediation and V for Vendetta: Textual Studies v. Cultural Studies." Crossing Boundaries I: Literature, Art & Culture. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Vancouver, BC. 2 September 2010.

---. "Anarchism and Poetics in Late Modernism: Paris, Cairo, San Francisco, London." On Miracle Ground XVI. International Lawrence Durrell Society. Louisiana Technical University. New Orleans. 7-10 July 2010.

---. "Literatures of the Ionian Islands: From Stewart to H.D." Iowa Writer's Workshop, Overseas Workshop. University of Iowa. Corfu, Greece. 5 July 2010. (keynote paper)

---. "Anarchism and Poetic Form: From the Villa Seurat to the New Apocalypse." Belief and Disbelief in the Space Between. Conference of The Space Between Society: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945. University of Portland. Portland, OR. 17-19 June 2010.

---. "Between the Auden Generation and the New Apocalypse: Politics and Poetry Networks in the 1930s and 40s." Lunch 'n Learn. Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB. 20 January 2010.

---. "Theory and the Archive." (with Jean-Michel Rabaté, Michael LeMahieu, Melba Kuddy-Keane, Michael O'Driscoll, Rachel Porter, and Stephen Ross). Round table Co-Organizer with Stephen Ross. The Languages of Modernism. 11th Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. McGill University. Montreal, QC. 5-8 November 2009.

---. "Anarchism, Late Modernism, and Author Networks from Cairo to California." The Languages of Modernism. 11th Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. McGill University. Montreal, QC. 5-8 November 2009. (seminar paper)

---."Anarchist Form and Avant Garde Politics: American and British WWII Poetry Networks." &Now Conference of Innovative Writing & the Literary Arts. University at Buffalo, SUNY. Buffalo, NY. 14-17 October 2009.

Gifford, James. "Langrishe, Go Down and the Traveling Text: The Irish Novel's South African Origins." Ireland on the Move. 19th American Conference for Irish Studies. University of Tennessee Chattanooga. Chattanooga, TN. 20-22 March 2009.

---. "From Fabians to Anarchists: English Surrealism in the 1930s and 40s." 37th Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 19-21 February, 2009.

Gifford, James. "Modernism/Mythistorema: Philhellenism in Late Modernisms." Modernism and Global Media. 10th Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. Vanderbilt University. Nashville, TN. 13-16 November, 2008.

ABSTRACT: In his essay "Cavafy and Eliot--A Comparison," George Seferis suggests a fundamental distinction between the two poets' senses of tradition, instantiating an alternative approach to artistic production in the Mediterranean. Reading Cavafy's "Those Who Fought for the Achaean League," Seferis:
appreciated that the poem was written in 1922, on the eve of the catastrophe in Asia Minor; and almost without thinking I reread these lines as:
    Written in Alexandria by an Achaean,
    The year that our race was destroyed.
Seferis presents Cavafy within an intensely politicized sense of ethnicity and nationalism caught in a poem of exile -- the affinity between past and present occurs in the same space and under related circumstance but separated by millennia. This is a striking difference from Eliot's tradition, and Seferis uses this wedge to pry the two apart. This reading of Cavafy is fatuous, but as a late modernist misprision, it exemplifies distinctly Greek and Philhellenic literary activities from the early 1930s through World War II. This view also reflects tensions among several late modernist authors active in the Hellenic world and the territories envisioned as a Greater Greece prior to their demise in 1922. This talk examines the Cairo Poets in this context as well as their influence on Anglo-American literary activities in the 1930s and 1940s. I particularly attend to the dense interactions among Greek influences on the anarchist transformation of English Surrealism, Greek authors in the Government in Exile, American Surrealism, and the New Apocalypse poets.
PODCAST: here (.mp3).

---. "Anarchist Author Networks: From Athens to Big Sur in the 1930s and 40s." Modernism and Global Media. 10th Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. Vanderbilt University. Nashville, TN. 13-16 November, 2008. (seminar paper)

---. "Reconstructing the Villa Seurat Network: Anarcho-Surrealist Activity 1935-60." On Miracle Ground XV. International Lawrence Durrell Society. UniversitƱ Paris X, Nanterre. Paris, France. 1-5 July, 2008.

---. "'Caliban seeing his own face in a glass': Corfiot Travel Narratives and Prospero's Refracting Dark Crystal." Travel Writing, Spirit of Place, and Discovery of Self. Durrell School of Corfu, Greece. 1-6 June, 2008.

---. "Allotropes in the Obelisk: Late Modernist Love and Censorship of the Queer Text." An Investigation of Modern Love. Durrell School of Corfu, Greece. 18-23 May, 2008.

---. "Poetic Text, Music Text: Competing Nationalist Styles in Restoration Opera." Extraordinary Interpretations: Narratives and Practices. Comparative Literature Program. University of Alberta, AB. 21-23 March, 2008. (seminar organizer)

---. "Anglo-American Surrealisms and the Villa Seurat: France, England, Greece, America, and Egypt." Geographies of Visual and Literary Culture. 9th Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. University of Southern California. Long Beach, CA. 1-4 November, 2007. (seminar organizer)

---. "Plural 'Canadas' in the Works of Edward Taylor Fletcher." Still the 'Last Best West' or Just Like the Rest? Interrogating Western Canadian Identities. Thompson Rivers University. Kamloops BC. 13-16 September, 2007.

ABSTRACT: Edward Taylor Fletcher is an unusual and now-forgotten figure: poet, philologist, essayist, architect, Surveyor General of Quebec, and musician. Landscape, language, and culture are also troubling notions in narratives of Canadian identity, yet for Fletcher they are surprisingly plural. His journals work in more than a dozen languages, his descriptions of place cover the oldest cities in Canada and the newest provinces while integrating Classical allusions, his autobiography includes residencies in Canada's major cities, and his recollections of cultural life across Canada focus on richly overlapping communities. I focus on changes to landscape descriptions in his poetic works, and in particular his Classical and Indian allusions, which coincide with his residency in Western Canada. The Nile blurs with the Fraser or Vancouver Island with Atlantis -- the result is a hybrid landscape and a poetic style that anticipate twentieth century movements while intervening in the development of the Confederation poets and 19th century Canadian narrative poems.
PODCAST: here.

---. "Surrealism's Anglo-American Afterlife: The Herbert Read and Henry Miller Network." Coordinates of Comparison: Texts, Readers, & Theories. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 29-31 August, 2007.

ABSTRACT: I retrace the unrecognized counter-narrative to Surrealism and its English offspring. I begin with Henry Miller and Herbert Read's unpublished correspondence surrounding the London International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936. Their correspondence charts an anarcho-individualist opposition to the socialism and dialectical materialism of the French Surrealists. Histories of English Surrealism record it as a short-lived phenomenon rising rapidly from the Exhibition and vanishing nearly as quickly. Contrastingly, the Read-Miller letters trace the changing political aims of Anglo-American surrealists while maintaining its aesthetics and techniques, which led to a reconstruction of the English-language Surrealists in a loose network centred on the Anglo-American Villa Seurat authors in Paris. This paper derives from a scholarly edition and study of the Miller-Read letters being published this Fall, as well as archival materials held at the University of Alberta, the University of Victoria, and UCLA.
PODCAST: here.

---. "Silence and Speaking -- Politicized Irony in Durrell's Spirit of Place." The Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies. University of British Columbia. Vancouver, BC. 17-22 August, 2007. (panel organizer)

ABSTRACT: At the 2004 session of the Durrell School of Corfu, Gayatri Spivak and Terry Eagleton illustrated the difficulties within Durrell's works that result in his relative exclusion from postcolonial studies of commonwealth literature: i.e. his ironic narrative voice in opposition to the kitsch exoticism of the 1950s and 60s. Drawing on the biographical complexity of his early position in Empire, I discuss the conflicts between Durrell's Orientalist exoticism, his longstanding Philhellenism, his works' ethical examination of alterity, irony in his neocolonialism, and his critiques of Imperialist power from within its privilege.
PODCAST: here.

---. "'The sealed book of the future': Edward Taylor Fletcher's Poetic, Political, and Poly-lingual Canada, 1827-97." Narratives of Citizenship. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 23-25 March, 2007.

ABSTRACT: This paper develops out of my current project to reprint the collected works of Edward Taylor Fletcher and to prepare a digital edition of his commonplace books. I give an overview of Fletcher, his works, and his importance, followed by a contextualization of his value to current notions of Canadian identity where multiple, overlapping, and contradictory narratives reflect an unstable subject.
PODCAST: here. (.m4v)

---. "Allusion to the Old Poet: M.G Vassanji, Lawrence Durrell, E.M Forster, and C.P. Cavafy." 35th Twentieth-Century Literature Conference. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 22-24 February, 2007.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "Heterosexist Presumption & the Villa Seurat: Questioning Queerings of the Censored Text." Sexing the Text: Gendered Works and Working Gender. Simon Fraser University, BC. 2-4 November, 2006.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "The Booster, Delta, and Seven 1937-40: Retracing Literary Circles and Publication Histories." 8th Modernist Studies Association Conference. Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. The University of Tulsa. Tulsa, OK. 19-22 October, 2006.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "'Not translate, but transplant' a Tower of Babel: Metaphoric (Dis)Continuities Between Cavafy, Eliot, Durrell, & Vassanji." Fourth Annual International Translation Day Conference. The Erotics of Translation. University of Alberta & the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 30 September, 2006.

ABSTRACT: Using Lacoue-Labarthe's transplantation versus translation in Revue de Littérature Comparée, I discuss the tower as a continuous, yet translated, metaphor in four works by C.P. Cavafy, T.S. Eliot, Lawrence Durrell, and M.G. Vassanji. The reader is provoked to construct an 'etymology' that moves ever-closer to the 'true word,' proceeding backward from the 'untrue' translation. Yet for all four, the cynosure of the tower marks their attempts: it guides and attracts. Eliot's bridge for his allusions has fallen down, and we can only shore the disjointed fragments of Nerval's "Le Prince d'Aquitaine à la tour abolie" beside the "black ruins" of Durrell's and Cavafy's Alexandrian lighthouse, all precariously near to Vassanji's leitmotif of the teetering "CN Tower blinking its mysterious signal." This leads me to conclude that to "Not translate, but transplant" is "Unreal" across these four highly allusive texts. My paper clarifies the failure of unity over discontinuity in this dense series of allusions.
PODCAST: here.

---."Henry Miller's 'Unknown' and Lawrence Durrell's Poetics: Vision and Revision in a Literary Relationship." On Miracle Ground XIV. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. University of Victoria. Victoria, BC. 25-29 June, 2006.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "The Reader's Anticipation, History's Contradiction, and Literary Hermeneutics: Teaching the 'Unknown' in 'Oil for the Saint'." ESSE 2006, Research Development of Empirical Studies. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 20-21 April 2006. (keynote address)

ABSTRACT: Keynote address. Please see linked abstract here.

---. "Hellenism/Modernism: Reading Eliot and Cavafy in Durrell's (Un)Real City." 33rd Twentieth-Century Literature Conference. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 23-25 February, 2006. (invited paper)

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Nationalism and Operatic Form; or, Competing Texts in Dryden and Purcell's King Arthur." Public Works. University of Alberta, Department of English. 16 February 2006.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "Fairest Isle and Foulest Foreigners; or, Musical Politics in Early English Opera.” Inner Sanctums and Outer Spaces in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods. Medieval & Early Modern Institute, University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB 8-9 December, 2005.

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Hellenism/Modernism: Negotiating Modernisms and the Philhellene in Greece." Anglo-American Literary Relations/Anglo-American Hellenisms. 5th Symbiosis Biennial Conference. Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. 30 June – 3 July, 2005.

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Taking Owls to Athens: Philhellenic Modernism." Representations in Transit: From the Wheel to the Reel. Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies, University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 18-19 March, 2005.

ABSTRACT: under construction.

---. "Modernist Communities of Desire: The Villa Seurat Circle." 32nd Twentieth-Century Literature Conference. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 24-26 February, 2005. (invited paper)

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "World War II and Alexandria: Lawrence Durrell's War-time Metropolis." 6th Modernist Studies Association Conference. Conference of the Modernist Studies Association. Simon Fraser University & University of British Columbia. Vancouver, BC. 21-24 October, 2004.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "Reading Fletcher's Commonplace Books: The Breadth of Cultural Influences in New Westminster, British Columbia, 1854-1895." Victorian Canada: Conference of the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada. University of Saskatchewan. Saskatoon, SK. 14-16 October, 2004. (accepted)

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Sexuality, Identity, and the Urban-Rural Divide in Lawrence Durrell's Novels." On Miracle Ground XIII: Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. Ionian University. Rhodes, Greece. 27 June - 2 July, 2004. (accepted)

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Agency and Domination in the Reconstitution of Male Identity: Malcolm Lowry's 'Forest Path to the Spring'." Making It Like A Man! Masculinities in Canadian Arts and Cultures. University of Regina. Regina, SK. 10-12 June, 2004. (accepted)

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

-. "'Miller's Numinous Cock': Censoring the Phallus." Talking Across Disciplines. Comparative Literature Program, University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 5 February, 2004.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "Durrell's Corfu: Site, Sight, and Textual Representation." 31st Twentieth-Century Literature Conference. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY. 26-28 February, 2004.

ABSTRACT: please see linked abstract here.

---. "Queer Transformations and/of Urban Space? Urban Geography and Sexual Identities in Lawrence Durrell's Novels." Cities of the Mind. Department of English, University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario. 23-25 Jan. 2004.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "Durrell's Aslant Lear at Corfu: Text versus Image in Travel Literature (1939-78)." 57th RMMLA Convention. Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association. Missoula, Montana. 9-11 October, 2003.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

Miall, David S., Don Kuiken, and James Gifford. "Why do students choose to study literature?" Improving Learning, Fostering the Will to Learn. European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction. Padova, Italy. 26-30 August, 2003.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

Gifford, James. "Durrell as Daedalus or Theseus? The Dark Labyrinth of the Durrell Archives." Archiving Modernism. University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta. 23-26 July, 2003.

ABSTRACT: I draw on (and survey) archival resources across North America and Europe, including previously overlooked materials, as well as urban and rural locales as records of the playfulness and referentiality of Durrell's works, with special attention to Hellenic materials. In doing so, I demonstrate how the concept of the archive and the academic excavation of a text (as well as the expectations inherent in such reading methods) act as structural influences in Durrell’s texts, such that the researcher continually finds an author who has anticipated his or her textual-archival explorations, fishing Ariadne's thread to the minotaur and back, so to speak. I argue that such readerly anticipations are best regarded as 'techniques' specifically employed by Durrell in writing to the specialized reader.

---. "Terror Management Theory and Literature: Reading Social Identity, Self-Esteem, and Fear." Culture and the State. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 2-5 May, 2003.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "'CORFU LANDSCAPES Real & Imaginary': Representing Space in Popular Media." Culture and the State. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 2-5 May 2003.

ABSTRACT: This paper considers popular culture materials that depict Corfu, Greece, in the context of postcolonial studies. The specific works include Mary Stewart's romance-cum-mystery novel, This Rough Magic, Ian Fleming's short story "For Your Eyes Only," and the James Bond film of the same title. My general conclusions are that Hellenism, as a disciplinary field, may be profitably explored in a manner akin to Edward Said's method in Orientalism.

van Woudenberg, Maximilian and James Gifford. "Beyond Electronic Text: Seeing the Tonality of Text." Culture and the State. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. 2-5 May, 2003

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

Gifford, James. "'Her eyes Confess the flame her tongue denies': Using Visual and Aural Media to Explore Dido and Aeneas in the Classroom." New Perspectives in Humanities Computing. University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta. 5-6 December, 2002.

ABSTRACT: The multimedia classroom presents a quandary to the technologically innovative instructor, and I found myself in this position when teaching Tate's verse drama, Dido and Aeneas. My problem was not what to teach in this work, but how to use the technological resources at my disposal, and subsequently, why such work seemed to be uniquely "multimedia." Specifically, Dido and Aeneas is the libretto for Purcell's Restoration opera, and the computerized classroom allowed me to combine aural, visual, and textual materials in rapid succession, hence demonstrating the interdisciplinary nature of the artwork. My quandary is this: in what way does my 2002 Smart room at the U of A offer multimediality in a way unique from that which I experienced nearly a decade earlier in a traditional music class? Is the term "multimedia," in reference to technological innovations pedagogically sound, and how should we describe the multimediality of traditional classrooms?

---. "Lear(ing) at Corfu: Intertextuality and Subversion of Colonial Travels." Intersections II: Avenues of Literary Context. Simon Fraser University. Burnaby, British Columbia. 27-28 September, 2002.

ABSTRACT: Few landscapes claim an overt colonial influence as strongly Corfu, Greece. 'Beautified' by a replica of the Parisian Rue de Rivoli, two Venetian fortresses (and a Venetian cityscape), British government buildings and a church, and even an Austrian mansion, Corfu offers a cosmopolitan palimpsest of urban landscapes to tourists every year. These overlaid histories, cultures, and architectures form the crux of Lawrence Durrell's "Oil for the Saint" (1966), which is itself a kind of palimpsest over Prospero’s Cell (1945) and under Blue Thirst (1975).

Miall, David, Don Kuiken, and James Gifford. "Reasons for Reading and Studying Literature." IGEL 2002: International Congress. International Society for Empirical Study of Literature. University of Pécs. Pécs, Hungary. August 21-24, 2002.

ABSTRACT: How do readers in an introductory course in English literature at the University of Alberta explain their own reading proclivities? What reasons do they provide for the satisfaction taken in reading different types of text? How are their preferences for particular types of text related to their reasons for deciding to study literature? We are beginning to obtain answers to these questions, thanks to a questionnaire designed by Achim Barsch, and used by him and a group led by Sonia Zyngier in Brazil. Our interest in this work led us to adapt the questionnaire for the Canadian context, thus we now have findings from three different countries. In this paper we introduce some of our own findings.

Gifford, James and Jonathan Pearman. "The Online Critical Bibliography: The Advantages and Challenges of the Online Medium." e-durrell Panel. On Miracle Ground XII - Lawrence Durrell & Co: A Multicultural Circle. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. University of Ottawa. Ottawa, Canada. 20-24 June, 2002.

ABSTRACT: The available print materials cataloguing critical studies of Lawrence Durrell's works are both extensive and highly valuable. Therefore, in the shadow of this previous scholarship, my task in creating an online bibliographic checklist involves an evaluation and justification of the need for further work in this area, as well as an investigation of how the electronic medium can offer new uses for this pre-existing work and the additions I have made to it. Specifically, I will discuss the state of the online bibliography project and the materials that it covers. This work currently includes over one thousand and five hundred entries on critical and primary sources, making it the largest source of such references available in a single location; however, it is mostly un-annotated at this time, it exists only as a checklist, and by virtue of the electronic medium, it questions concepts of a 'single location.' Developing from the Koger-MacNiven bibliography, the Vander Closter annotated resource, and the Brigham-Thomas checklist, the online bibliography offers the advantages of constant updating to a single site as new materials appear, as well as the eventual addition of annotations, and the possibility of corrections or the addition of greater details. Moreover, this makes materials available to scholars from a single source.

Gifford, James. "Homoerotic Anxiety and the East/West Dialectic in Monsieur." On Miracle Ground XII - Lawrence Durrell & Co: A Multicultural Circle. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. University of Ottawa. Ottawa, Canada. 20-24 June, 2002.

ABSTRACT: There is a general perception that sexualities fall into two broad categories: those that are 'correct' or 'moral' and 'everything else.' I doubt I would encounter much resistance to placing Lawrence Durrell's works in the 'everything else' group, especially since the first group only exists as an idea. Therefore, I feel justified in calling Durrell's transgressive sexualities 'queer.' Queer Theory has gained a certain currency in academia over the past decade, and in this context Durrell certainly queers the sexual landscape of his books. Given the increasing cultural capital for queer theory, it is peculiar that the articles focusing on sexual transgression in Durrell's works can be counted on one hand and are generally from the past decade; moreover, they confine themselves to gay and lesbian studies without moving into queer theory. Out of the articles by Joseph Boone, Mark Hawthorne, and Roger Bowen, where the homosexual and the themes of homosexuality, homoeroticism, and transgressive sexualities are dominant, I find it telling that none take as their focus Durrell's novel narrated by a homosexual, Monsieur; that is, a work that depicts multiple queer sexualities, including homosexuality and heterosexuality.

---. "Introduction: 'Technology and the Palimpsest in Literature and Landscape.'" On Miracle Ground XII - Lawrence Durrell & Co: A Multicultural Circle. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. University of Ottawa. Ottawa, Canada. 20-24 June, 2002.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "Welcome to the Postcolonial World: Why 'Post,' Why Corfu, and Why Durrell." Public Lecture. Durrell School of Corfu, Ionian Cultural Centre. Corfu, Greece. 30 May 2002.

ABSTRACT: For academic orientations over the past fifty years, few approaches to literature have been more pervasive than postcolonial theory. In my talk, I intend to go over some of the territory that defines the 'postcolonial' and why its influence has been so wide and longstanding. I also want to problematize some of the easy categorizations and assumptions that often go part and parcel with postcolonial theory. In the same vein, I want to be sure that I don't overlook the place where this discussion is taking place, namely Corfu, Corcyra, or Kerkyra (as some people call it). Lastly, since we are all here, presumably, out of some affection or interest in the writings of the Durrell brothers, I will give a few quick examples of how Lawrence Durrell’s novels can offer important materials to investigations of postcolonialism, colonialism, Imperialism, and their aftermath.

---. "Self-Authenticity as Social Resistance: Reading Empiric Approaches to Social Identity, Self-Esteem, and Fear via Lawrence Durrell's Monsieur; or, The Prince of Darkness." Notions of Self and Selfhood. Conference In Comparative Literature, Religion, & Film/Media Studies. University of Alberta. Edmonton, Canada. 10-12 May, 2002.

ABSTRACT: Using examples and thematic materials from Lawrence Durrell's novel Monsieur, I propose to debate the theoretical terrain surrounding psychoanalysis' lost offspring, daseinanalysis, which has come to roost in empiric psychology via Terror Management Theory and Social Identity Theory. Moreover, I will focus my argument on how this debate suggests self-authenticity as resistance to the domination of the individual by fear and anxiety, usually through social institutions. Wayne Burns' and Richard Rorty's distinctions concerning the private and public selves inform my analysis of empiric psychology's dense linking of death awareness with increased aggression, social identification, and resistance to self-reflexivity, as well as self-esteem (predicated on social identity) as a buffer to this anxiety. The theoretical apparatus behind this empiric research is derived from Ernest Becker, Otto Rank, and Herbert Marcuse. Likewise, I will use Durrell – as a member of this circle – as an author whose texts demonstrate the literary exemplification of this theorizing and (now) empiric study. In this context, I will argue that self-authenticity actively refutes the homogenizing force of social pressure by wilfully gaining a symbolic mastery over the traum(a) that social systems serve to deny. To contain my examination in a manageable timeframe, I assume the possibility of a self-identity distinct from social identity and death as a primary anxiety; however, I do so in the context of other supportive theoretical and empiric research that I have engaged with elsewhere.

---. "Colonizing Death: Knowing, Defining and Denying In Terror Management Theory." Speaking of Analysis: The Corpus, the Corpse, and Mutual Efforts. Public Works. Graduate Students of English Association. University of Alberta, Department of English. 28 Feb. 2002.

ABSTRACT: Under Construction.

---. "Landscape as Colonial Palimpsest in 'Oil for the Saint'." Test Drive. University of Alberta, Department of English. 24 Jan. 2002.

ABSTRACT: Using both aural and visual media, I propose to visually trace the terrain and colonial history of Corfu using "Oil for the Saint" as a 'travel guide' and to demonstrate the complexity of Lawrence Durrell's debated relationship to Empire and colonial writing. In the course of this discussion, I will demonstrate the usefulness of considering both the textual materials and the physical facts of the landscape they depict via the metaphor of a palimpsest. Moreover, I contend that the intertextual and archeological aspects of this image blur together, rendering Durrell's superficially simple narrative into a complex depiction of the colonial history of Corfu.

---. "Mothers, Fathers, Sex and Mystery: Imagining Childhood and Home in Lawrence Durrell's Pied Piper of Lovers." Imagining Home and Abroad. Public Works. Graduate Students of English Association. University of Alberta, Department of English. 21 Nov. 2001.

ABSTRACT: Under construction.

---. "Reevaluating Postcolonial Theory in Durrell's Alexandria Quartet." Literary Studies and Global Culture. University of Victoria, Department of English. 16-17 Mar. 2001.

ABSTRACT: Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet has posed a difficult problem to the literary canon; how ought one read the self-conscious creation of differing global perspectives (and readings of Others) within a context of Foucauldian order-construction, Nietzsche's single world assertion, and epistemic uncertainty? As a result, it remains largely untaught and unread within the context of current theoretical models and academic approaches to reading. Those relatively few scholars who have taken modern views on postcolonial theory to Durrell's work often fix it firmly in the territory of colonial writings filled with disturbingly unabashed depictions of the Oriental Other and bold assertions of the artist's colonization through 'knowing' in the act of writing. My paper is a writing-back at these postcolonial readings of Durrell's Alexandria Quartet and I additionally suggest that Durrell's self-reflexive treatment of the author as fabulator both anticipates much of postcolonial theory in the form depicted by Edward Said and problematizes its oversimplification of the difficulty of epistemology within a knowledge-power relationship.

---. "Death Anxiety and Djuna Barnes' Nightwood: The Conflict Over Freudian Analysis." Public Works. Graduate Students of English Association. University of Alberta, Department of English. 16 Jan. 2001.

ABSTRACT: For a more complete version of this paper, please see nasty 11 (2002)

---. "The Search to Know And Colonize Death In Monsieur: Reflections Of Rank and Anticipations of Becker In The Quintet." On Miracle Ground XI: Durrell On Corfu. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. Ionian Cultural Centre at Faliraki, Corfu, Greece. 4 Jul. 2000.

ABSTRACT: Images of death are prevalent throughout Durrell's oeuvre, appearing in multiple forms ranging from the physical to the Foucauldian death of madness. Despite its recurrence and thematic significance, death remains a mysterious question hanging over Durrell's fictions, distanced from the knowable by an uncertainty that keeps both the dead and the living from a 'direct apprehension' of death or the hyper-reality of it. In conjunction with this uncertainty, related to the broader epistemological skepticism at work in these novels, the lingering influence of Otto Rank can be detected in the trauma associated with the existential incompatibility death is shrouded in, and the varying methods shown for psychologically repressing this trauma. This is the same subject broached by Ernest Becker in his nearly posthumous The Denial of Death, which is highly derivative of Rankian views. Durrell's works may be appropriately viewed through this theoretical framework due to his early interest in Rank's writings, and connection through Henry Miller and Anaïs Nin, as well as his long-term contemplation of both death and psychoanalysis in general.

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PUBLIC AND GUEST LECTURES:

Gifford, James. "'Oil for the Saint': Touring Corfu and Subverting the Colonial Landscape." Lecture. Durrell School of Corfu. Corfu, Greece, 23 Jun. 2003.

---. "Conrad's 'The Secret Sharer' & Durrell's 'Oil for the Saint': Colonial Landscapes." Guest Lecture. English 101. University of Alberta, Department of English. Edmonton, 29 May 2003.

---. "The Musical Durrell: A Performance." On Miracle Ground XII - Lawrence Durrell & Co: A Multicultural Circle. Conference of the International Lawrence Durrell Society. University of Ottawa. Ottawa, Canada. 21 June, 2002.

ABSTRACT: A recital of art song settings of Lawrence Durrell's poetry and related musical works, with dramatic readings from his poetry, novels and correspondence, as well as a more formal introduction).

---. "Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Uncertainty, Freud and Nietzsche." Guest Lecture. English 101. University of Alberta, Department of English. Edmonton, 23 Jul. 2002.

---. "Lawrence Durrell's Balthazar: Metaphysical Speculation and Sexual Curiosity in The Alexandria Quartet." Guest Lecture. English 366: British Literature from 1945. University of Alberta, Department of English. Edmonton, 3 Apr. 2001.

---. "Lawrence Durrell's 'Asylum in the Snow': The Move to Modernism." Guest Lecture. English 101. University of Alberta, Department of English. Edmonton, 16 Feb. 2001.

---. "Keats and Negative Capability: Letters and 'Ode to a Nightingale.'" Guest Lecture. English 101. University of Alberta, Department of English. Edmonton, 8 Jan. 2001.

---. "Deconstructing History: Relating the Medieval Romance to T.S. Eliot, Lawrence Durrell and Umberto Eco." Guest Lecture. Humanities 305: The Chivalric Ideal. Simon Fraser University, Department of Humanities. Burnaby, 26 May. 2000.

---. "Telemann and His Circle." Pre-concert Lecture. Le Ton Beau de Telemann. Kammermusik. Vancouver, 27 & 28 Feb. & 1 Mar. 1998.

---. "Music, Emotion and Meaning." Pre-concert Lecture. If On A Winters Night A Traveller. Kammermusik. Vancouver, 13, 14 & 19 Dec. 1997.

---. "The Business of Music: Creating Venues, Fundraising and Solicitation." Lecture. Kwantlen University College, Department of Music. Langley, 12 Nov. 1997.

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Unpublished Materials:

---. What Is Žižek So Afraid Of? The Reality Principle and The Real Versus The Existential Hordes, paper for English 567, Freud, Lacan & Žižek.

---. Otto Rank and American Imago, informal presentation for English 567, Freud, Lacan & Žižek.

---. Tristram Shandy & Causation, informal presentation for English 660, the 18th Century Novel.

---. Sexuality and the Morally Didactic Novel; Pamela’s Pornographic Sisters, informal presentation for English 660, the 18th Century novel.

---. Sigmund Freud, Otto Rank and Ernest Becker: Alternative Theories Surrounding reading Death and Death Anxiety, informal presentation for English 673, Victorian Commemorations.

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Page Created: January 29, 2001 | Last Updated: 30 June 2012