Faculty

Portrait of Geoffrey DippleDr. Geoffrey Dipple, Professor of History and Chair of Social Sciences
PhD. Queen’s University

Geoff Dipple earned his PhD in early modern European history at Queen’s University in 1991. He has since taught at Queen’s, the University of Ottawa, the University of Toronto, and most recently at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. During his eighteen years at the South Dakota Augustana, he held several administrative positions, including chair of the history department and chair of the social science division. He has published widely in the history of the Protestant Reformation in the German-speaking lands.


Dr. Mélanie Méthot, Associate Professor 
B.A., McGill
M.A., Universite de Moncton
Ph.D., University of Calgary

Dr. Méthot teaches courses in Canadian History, Crime and Criminal Justice in Canada, Canadian Urban History, Women in Canadian History, Quebec History and Methods of Historical Research. Her current research focuses on marriage and family in Canada and Australia. Mélanie has published on social reformers in academic journals such as the Urban History Review, Manitoba History, Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society, and Revué D'Histoire Intellectuelle de L'Amerique Francaise.

More information about Dr. Méthot's research can be found on her faculty web page.

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Dr. Petr Mirejovsky, Associate Professor 
Graduate Interpreter-Translator, University of the 17th of November, Prague
M.A., University of Calgary
Ph.D., University of Toronto

Dr. Petr Mirejovsky teaches a variety of courses in European History including a general survey course, courses on 18th, 19th and 20th Century Europe as well as more specialized courses on German, East European and Russian/Soviet History.

He is currently working on the history of a school in a small town in Eastern Bohemia from 1895 to 1960. 

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Dr. Daniel Sims, Assistant Professor of History
B.A. Concordia University College of Alberta (Concordia University of Edmonton)
M.A. University of Alberta
Ph.D. University of Alberta

Daniel Sims teaches Canadian history with a focus on British Columbia, the West, the North, and Indigenous peoples. He is particularly interested in native-newcomer relations, economic development, the environment, and identity. Currently he is working a book on the impacts of the W.A.C. Bennett Dam and Williston Lake reservoir on the Tsek'ehne of Northern British Columbia as well as a new research project on failed developments in the Finlay-Parsnip watershed. Daniel is a member of the Tsay Keh Dene First Nation in northern British Columbia and has worked not only with his own nation, but also with the two other Tsek'ehne nations of Kwadacha and McLeod Lake.

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