Outcomes

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About Outcome Statements

Outcome statements translate the description of the Desired Future into strategic guidance for future development and action. Outcome statements are far more complex than generally stated goals we hope to achieve some time in the future. Outcome statements serve three purposes. They are used to:

1. Develop a shared understanding and commitment to a vision for the future.
2. Identify indicators to measure and monitor our progress and determine thresholds that will guide future growth and development.
3. Help analyze and assess risk based on our understanding of current conditions, and on human pressures from proposed development and policies on our environment, communities and economy (using a modeling process).

For example, an Alberta organization called the Clean Air Strategic Alliance developed the following outcome statement to describe “clean” air: The air will have no adverse odour, taste or visual impact and have no measurable short- or long-term adverse effects on people, animals or the environment. The statement describes:

* How “clean” air is defined (no adverse odour, taste or visual impact)
* What we need to measure (odour, taste, visual impact)
* How we will know when we achieve success (no measurable short-or long-term adverse affects on people, animals or the environment).

Place-specific outcomes are even more challenging, because “place” describes more than just biophysical boundaries (such as a watershed). “Place” also describes community identity. Therefore science is not the only thing that guides our actions. Local values, and how we choose to work together to achieve our desired future also impact our decisions.

Currently, our understanding of how the economy works is highly developed. We certainly know how to measure and monitor our economic ups and downs, although there are differences of opinion on the roles and responsibilities of government. The environmental sciences are developing rapidly. Some areas of science (such as surface water) are better understood than others (such as groundwater), and there are still very large gaps in available data, especially at the local scale. The social dimension (such as community identity) is the least understood, but is also beginning to develop as we better understand the interrelationship/interdependencies between the economy, the environment and our communities.

Therefore, outcome statements should be considered works in progress. Some will be more precise than others, and we must be open to improving these statements, to make them more useful, as our understanding of what we desire and how we are going to work together to achieve it, evolves over time.

Government of Alberta Outcomes

Many groups across Alberta are currently engaged in developing outcomes to guide development strategies and actions at the provincial and regional levels. This project is the first to develop place-specific outcomes for a sub-regional (local) area.

These sub-regional outcomes will be used to inform larger-scale Government of Alberta planning initiatives, such as the Land-use Framework. It is important, however, to ensure the reverse is also true, that Government of Alberta planning initiatives such as the Land-use Framework inform local outcomes. This alignment of outcomes, from the provincial down to the local level will ensure that collectively, as Albertans, we are all working towards achieving outcomes that complement, rather than compete with each other.

To support this alignment, the Government of Alberta provided the Community Outcomes Team with a list of currently identified provincial-scale outcomes, as well as the Government of Alberta policy documents where they can be found. To facilitate this process, the consultants promised to bring to the attention of the Community Outcomes Team any problems relating to the alignment of their outcomes with others being developed at larger scales.

Draft Outcome Statements

The outcome statements developed by the Community Outcomes Team will not only be used to inform the Land- use Framework and the development of regional-scale outcome statements, but will hopefully be used to inform local planning processes as well.

Table of Contents

Based on the assumptions underlying their Desired Future, the Community Outcomes Team drafted the following suites of outcome statements for the following factors:

1. Energy Future
2. Economic Sustainability
3. Nature of Community
4. Water and Environmental Sustainability
5. Governance and Accountability

Following these charts of draft outcome statements is a list Provincial-scale Outcomes Identified in key Government of Alberta Policy Documents.

1. Energy Future

Energy Future: Summary of Assumptions Underlying the Desired Future

Energy production will shift over time from non-renewable to renewable sources. Expect the price of energy to rise. Coal resources in the area will likely be developed as technology and markets enable it. Production of natural resources, however, will be limited to the carrying capacity of the environment and communities, and driven by locally-available renewable sources. More jobs will become available in the renewable sector. The newest technology will keep the footprint small. Energy efficiency and conservation will be important. Manufacturing of renewable energy will be more for local use, rather than for export. There is potential to distribute the energy at smaller scales - municipalities, neighbourhoods and farms. Power generation can come from agricultural or municipal waste sources. Co-generation will become important, as waste material from one industry is used to generate energy for another.

Community Outcome Team Desired Future - Assumptions Draft Outcome Statement Related Government of Alberta Outcomes
Global outlook

* Will there still be a market for our oil?
* With the increase in technology, the playing field will level out between “have” and “have not” countries

In Alberta

* Decreasing production of non-renewable energy production and increase of renewable. A balance must be kept: as the one decreases, the other must be available, so we still have energy that is both available and affordable.
* R&D will be global and we’ll be tapping into that
* Assume coal resources in our area will be developed as technology and markets enable it
* Production of natural resources limited to carrying capacity and what’s available to use. E.g.: if area doesn’t have wind, can’t produce energy from wind
* Offsets –recognize impacts of energy production on environment and have offsets –raises questions regarding what will be measured
* Expect price to rise
* There will be a shift but not a radical change – type of job will also change – more jobs in renewable sector
* Alberta will need to diversify energy sources to meet energy needs through many ways
* This shift needs to be supported at top Government levels
* Expect to be increasingly reliant on external sources of energy. May not be self sufficient in all our needs – may still import energy such as diesel fuel

Our Energy future

* We will continue to produce oil and gas but in a more responsible and sustainable way
* We will use the newest technology to keep footprint small
* Energy conservation will be important

* Increasing efficiency of energy use will be important

Energy production:

* Manufacturing of renewable energy will be more for local use, rather than for export- we export oil – most countries will produce energy based on wind, solar- each country can produce its own – we may not need to export as much
* Potential to distribute the energy (wind as example) at smaller scales - municipalities, neighbourhoods and farms
* Power generation from agricultural or municipal waste sources
* Small systems may be created that produce green energy or are off grid. May be able to sell excess to large industry
* Cogeneration of energy – use waste material from one source to facilitate energy production elsewhere (biomass). E.g. In Grande Prairie, using waste heat from pulp mills to heat buildings

Energy #1: Energy use

Our energy system is characterized by responsible and sustainable development and use

Energy #2: Energy Development

Energy resources are developed in a way that optimizes value and minimizes waste, emissions and landscape disturbance.

Energy #3: Surface/Subsurface Interface:

Planning for subsurface activity should be managed to achieve regional outcomes.

Alberta’s Provincial Energy Strategy:

Exercising resourcefulness and responsibility, we believe that we will be able to achieve the following explicit outcomes:

* Clean energy production.
* Wise energy use.
* Sustained economic prosperity.

2. Economic Sustainability

Economic Sustainability: Summary of Assumptions Underlying the Desired Future

Importance of a sustainable environment and communities leads to a recognition that limits may need to be placed on economic growth. Modest growth is acceptable. Economic growth at all costs is not acceptable. Alternative energy is viewed as a means to sustain and create business opportunities. Agriculture is one of the strengths and advantages of the economy, with both big and small farms coexisting in the area, and value-added processing of agricultural products supporting the region. Economic diversification through the expansion of small businesses is desirable, with a focus on small manufacturing (cottage industry), services and IT. Green jobs provide environmental services. Regional centers of excellence for health and education are developed in the region (such as the new Centre for Sustainable Communities at Augustana Campus). Balanced coexistence of land use and development (residential, commercial, industrial and agriculture) will require continued concerted local, municipal and collaborative regional planning, supported by provincial and regional guidelines and technical expertise.

Community Outcome Team Desired Future - Assumptions Draft Outcome Statement Related Government of Alberta Outcomes
Growth

* Balanced economic growth is acceptable within the limits of the carrying capacity of the environment
* Do not want economic growth at all costs

Business

* Variety of business types and scales resulting in less vulnerability to economic ups and downs
* Serve local, provincial and international markets
* Built on regional strengths and advantages
* Built on basis of balanced economic growth (see above)
* Branding: East Central stands for certain products
* Cottage industries; Locally owned; Home based businesses
* Many small business – smaller than 20 employees
* New green jobs providing environmental services may be created
* Manufacturing without large water volume requirements
* All essential retail goods and services are locally available

ECON #1: Economic Diversification

A diverse range of small businesses, including agri-business and green jobs, are encouraged and supported.

ECON #2: Local Marketing

Locally produced, economically viable, goods and services are identified and marketed as made in East Central Alberta promoting regional cooperation, community spirit and pride.

GOA Strategic Business Plan

Build Alberta’s next generation economy – knowledge-based, value-added, innovative and diversified.

Finance and Enterprise Business Plan

Facilitate regional economic development and community capacity building by supporting Regional Economic Development Alliances with other government departments and other economic development organizations and partnerships

Alberta’s Regional Economic Development Alliances Overview-June 2008

Support the identification and marketing of investment ready opportunities that attract investment both from within and outside the region.

Agriculture

* Large and small farms
* Large farms – big, locally owned and getting bigger
* Value added food production
* Agri businesses have good growth potential

ECON # 3: Agricultural Income

A diverse range of environmentally and economically sustainable, and preferably locally owned, farms and agricultural businesses are encouraged and supported.

ECON #4: Agricultural Practices

Agricultural practices, such as agroforestry, support environmental stewardship, are ecologically sensitive and economically viable.

ECON #5: Ecological Goods and Services (EGS) and Agriculture:

EGS are valued and provide a viable income stream for farmers.

Agriculture and Rural Development Business Plan 2008-11

Facilitate growth and development of diverse agricultural and rural businesses and their networks.

Agriculture and Rural Development Business Plan 2008-11

Grant better access to capital for farmers, agri-business and value added industries.

Employment

* Become regional center in a specialized area
* Jobs available locally
* Low unemployment
* Full employment for a range of backgrounds (jobs for employees with diverse backgrounds)
* Stable workforce; less vulnerability to economic up s and downs

ECON #6: Stable Employment

A diverse, stable rural economy provides a range of locally available education, training and jobs including secondary income opportunities to support diverse farming enterprises.

ECON #7: Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Rural Development

East Central Alberta is recognized as a world leader in sustainable rural development.

GOA Strategic Business Plan

Build a capable and well-educated workforce by Albertans with the opportunities they need to lead, adapt and develop new knowledge and skills.

Building and Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce

Albertans gain improved access to the education and training needed to address short-term labour market demands and build long-term capacity to respond to future opportunities and challenges.

Transportation/Communications/IT

* Infrastructure to support local economies
* Increased public transportation
* Alternate energy sustains business and creates jobs

ECON #8: Rural Infrastructure

Ecologically sensitive investments in regional networks of transportation, communications and technology support the development of complete communities and a sustainable rural economy.

Notes regarding modeling:

* Econ #2: Local Marketing: Battle River Alliance for Economic Development (BRAED) is responsible for promoting this in the region, and has indicators and data that may be useful.
* ECON #6: Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Rural Development: Dr. Roger Epp from Augustana Campus suggested the new Director of the Alberta Centre for Sustainable Rural Communities could provide input regarding indicators and available data when they are on Campus in the fall of 2009.

3. Nature of Community

Nature of Community: Summary of Assumptions Underlying the Desired Future

The population in East Central Alberta is growing. There is more cultural diversity. Services are available within the region to support the growing population. There is more regional planning, partnerships and cooperation managing and supporting the growth. Agricultural land is protected. Locally-made products are more available and people living in the region “shop local”. There is community pride, reflected in the investment of both money and time (volunteerism). Community pride also supports stewardship. The environment is valued and protected, which attracts people to live in the region. Economics is not the foundation – it’s a social foundation.

Community Outcome Team Desired Future – Assumptions Draft Outcome Statement Related Government of Alberta Outcomes
Population

* Repopulation of rural areas resulting in ability to provide better local service
* Diverse populations
* Population distributed across a wide spread of age and ethnic groups

Services

* Demand for services increases. Services in area regionalize to improve quality and become more efficient
* Community services are well funded and available especially through networks
* Provision of health services – needed as aging population grows
* Opportunities for local education
* Levels of education increases.
* Subsidy available to low income families to participate in sports and community events
* Shared development with Sherritt for coal mine, such as a man-made lake for recreation

Housing

* Clustered accommodations
* Affordable housing for incoming employers and employees
* Housing is available to match demand and affordable housing
* Fixed and low income people financially comfortable

COM: #1 – Growth

Growth in East Central Alberta is driven by efficient use of land, including the development of regional communities that provide a diverse range of services, job opportunities and residential options for community members of different ages, incomes and cultural backgrounds.

COM: #2 -Education

A regional network of life-long formal and informal educational and capacity building opportunities provides the foundation for sustainable rural development in East Central Alberta.

COM #3: Aesthetic and Cultural Resources

The aesthetic character and cultural resources representative of East Central Alberta are valued and enhanced

Land-use Framework 2008:

People-friendly communities and ample recreational and cultural opportunities

Aboriginal Relations Business Plan

Alberta will coordinate discussions and initiatives with First Nations, provincial Métis organizations, industry, Alberta ministries and, where appropriate, the federal government to improve overall outcomes for Aboriginal people, including their participation in the economy and economic development in Aboriginal communities

GOA Strategic Business Plan:

Establish new methods of program delivery and funding (health care, children’s services, families, seniors and Albertans with disabilities)

GOA Strategic Business Plan:

Increase access to quality health care and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care services delivery

Capital Plan:

The 20-year strategic capital plan is intended as a blueprint to guide future decisions about priority infrastructure projects in eight key areas:

* Municipal infrastructure
* Provincial highway network
* Other transportation and corridors
* Health facilities
* Schools
* Post-secondary facilities
* Housing
* Provincial government projects; community facilities; and water and wastewater facilities.

Community spirit

* Revitalized sense of community spirit; vibrant
* Increased community participation and attendance at community events
* More accepting of new development in the area
* Volunteering; People have time; businesses provide employees with time to volunteer
* Exceptional quality of life
* A safe place to live; involvement in crime watch; safe communities attract business
* Sense of belonging
* Stronger sense of place supports stewardship
* Less conflict management and more facilitation
* Endowments from individuals and business builds community

COM #4: Community Spirit

Communities are actively involved in the creation of vibrant, resilient, inclusive, safe, and sustainable region that generates pride and sense of belonging for all residents.

The Spirit of Alberta: Alberta’s Cultural Policy:

Albertans explore and express their culture and that of their neighbours, communities, province and country

GOA Strategic Business Plan:

Support community needs and continue to recognize the value of the province’s artistic community (culture)

Shop local

* Self sufficiency: Communities increasingly able to provide for themselves
* All essential retail goods and services are locally available
* Local farmers markets more popular and more viable; more local produce/goods available
* Living, working and shopping in the community
* Family businesses (not just resource-based industry that attract young people and their problems)
* People who live and work there can buy everything locally ( within the region)
* Local economy produces and replaces products bought in China

COM #5: Local goods and services

The East Central Alberta region supports and promotes a range of goods and services produced locally.

 

Indicators suggested by the Community Outcomes Team:

COM: #1 – Growth: Travel time to essential services – as a measure of access

COM #4: Community Spirit: Service organizations and clubs (Lions Club, churches, Scouts, etc)

* Number of organizations/clubs – as a measure of community engagement
* Members (as a measure of engagement; community cohesiveness) – could be collected through local/regional census
* Locations (as a measure of access)

COM #4: Community Spirit: maintenance and upkeep

* Number of vacant business/industrial buildings
* Ability to visually see the Green Network - is it a part of the community/recreation/aesthetic complex
* Industrial development practices (bylaws) that require natural assets to be incorporated into the landscape plan.
* Are there bylaws setting standards for building maintenance
* Number of community pride days (sweep downtown; communities in bloom; adopt a highway, block or park, etc)
 

4. Water and Environmental Sustainability

Water and Environmental Sustainability: Summary of Assumptions Underlying the Desired Future

The environment underpins our quality of life. We see/feel the environment is “right”: there are trees, biodiversity, wetlands and green spaces. Natural habitat and agricultural lands are both preserved. There is sustainable agriculture and sustainable use of resources. Technology is used to improve/clean up the environment. Standards are set and enforced. Public awareness leads to awareness of the importance of the environment.

Community Outcome Team Desired Future - Assumptions Draft Outcome Statement Related Government of Alberta Outcomes
Green Space

* Trees, natural areas
* Green space in urban and rural setting
* City and towns have green spaces
* Less green grass
* Grow up, not wide – 5 story buildings
* Proactive conversion back to natural ecosystems
* Local naturalized areas – having Jasper experience without going to Jasper
* Return of marginal lands to natural habitat
* Preserve natural capital
* Small farms, more organic, leading to increased preservation of agricultural lands

ENV #1: Green Network

A network of natural and manmade ecologically functional landscapes are identified, protected and enhanced through management practices that to support quality of life through ecosystem good and services

Land-use Framework 2008:

Healthy ecosystems and environment:

The following guiding principles provide additional clarification:

* The intrinsic value of nature is respected.
* The life-supporting capacity of air, water, land and biodiversity are maintained or enhanced, and the natural resources that form part of the environment are sustained.
* Soil and soil fertility are maintained and/or enhanced.
* Greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution are reduced, waste is minimized, and the biodiversity and abundance of native species and their natural habitats are maintained.

Increased biodiversity

* Wildlife is sustainable—and capable of bouncing back from disasters or development
* Wildlife preservation

ENV #2: Biodiversity

Biodiversity is valued, protected, promoted and enhanced throughout the region.

Land Use Framework 2008:

Healthy ecosystems and environment:

As above

Wetlands – quality and quantity

* Water in sufficient quality and quality for ecosystem

Water

* More water
* Increased water quality
* Clean water
* clean and treatable
* minimize effluent put into water
* water available for users
* water greatest good for the greatest number
* Technology can improve/clean up the environment

ENV #3: Clean Water ( Quality and Quantity)

Water management in East Central Alberta is based on water conservation principles to maximize water available for both communities and the environment

Surface water quality and quantity is maintained and improved through appropriate land use, Best Management Practices and incentives for conservation, and the conservation / restoration of riparian, wetland and other aquatic ecosystems.

Groundwater aquifers are protected through proper construction, maintenance and abandonment/ reclamation of wells, appropriate use of recharge zones, maintenance of sub-surface flows and sustainable allocation to ensure the long term quality and supply of ground water resources

Water for Life: Alberta’s Strategy for Sustainability

Water is managed and allocated to sustain aquatic ecosystems and ensure their contribution to Alberta’s natural capital and quality of life are maintained.

Water is managed and allocated to support sustainable economic development and the strategic priorities of the province.

Land-use Framework 2008:

Healthy ecosystems and environment: As above

Air

* Quality of air not to impair our health and the ecosystems
* Clean air
* Blue sky – no smog
* Technology can improve/clean up the environment
* Dark skies at night – protect stars by making light only go down

ENV #4: Air

The air has no adverse odour, taste, or visual impact and no measurable short or long term adverse effects on people, animals or the environment, and greenhouse gases are minimized and mitigated.

Clean Air Strategic Alliance Vision

The air will have no adverse odour, taste or visual impact and have no measurable short? or long?term adverse effects on people, animals or the environment.

Land-use Framework 2008:

Healthy ecosystems and environment:

As above

Efficient/sustainable use of resources

* Sustainable agriculture
* Awareness that environment is important
* Society more environmentally conscious/aware

 

5. Governance and Accountability

Governance and Accountability: Summary of Assumptions Underlying the Desired Future

Local autonomy is needed to ensure local needs are met. While there is no need for regional government, there is a need for regional cooperation, which should be achieved through partnerships and collaborative networks. More citizens need to be engaged in decisions that impact their communities. Governance processes must be transparent. Equity and funding issues need to be addressed.

Community Outcome Team Desired Future - Assumptions Draft Outcome Statement Related Government of Alberta Outcomes
Local autonomy

* Need local autonomy to ensure local needs are met
* Power stays with local bodies
* There may be fewer municipalities – they may join together
* Regionalization through cooperation
* Balanced coexistence of land use and development (residential, commercial, industrial and agriculture) will require continued concerted local, municipal and collaborative regional planning, supported by provincial and regional guidelines and technical expertise.
* Key uncertainty is balance of power between municipal decision-making and authority and provincial accountability – on whose shoulders should major vs minor decisions meet?
* Provincial rules should provide level playing field and be applied equitably, rather than different responses depending who you are talking to.
* Regional cooperation through partnerships and working together, but municipalities retain their autonomy
* Regional collaboration must be purposeful; focused on what is needed to make towns financially viable
* Regional cooperation around issues, but only local and provincial government, not regional government
* Local autonomy with a regional perspective; the intent is to deal with regional issues collaboratively
* Regional partnerships for roads, water, sewage, recreation facilities
* Regional outlook is needed for decisions such as sport facilities, hospitals
* We need cooperation to ensure good service
* Collaborative networks that includes additional groups such as watershed
* Our map looks like the tables in this room – collaboration by working together around specific issues

Equity, Funding and Capacity issues

* Levels of service within a municipality – can everyone in the municipality get the same level of service?
* Are there enough funds to be equitable
* The equity issue of voting rights and their allocation impacts the discussion about regional governance
* Who is in an advisory role and who has decision making authority
* Do population numbers determine representation
* How is decision making allocated in a regional governance model?

Gov #1: Complementary Governance

Transparent, accountable, financially stable and effective governments that cooperate and collaborate to achieve common outcomes, so that the work of all governments complements each other as well as that of other organizations.

Municipal Affairs (MA) 2008-11 Business Plan:

Accountable and effective local governments

GoA Business Plan:

Financially stable, open and accountable government; strong and effective municipalities and self-reliant Aboriginal communities.

Community Engagement

* The theme for governance is more people need to be engaged in public decisions; only 10% involvement now

* This kind of exercise (ECACEP) is important
* People will engage if they think they will have a say/input into the decisions and there is followed through
* Engagement depends on satisfaction with the process
* There will be greater accountability to the community due to increased participation

Process

* bring transparency to the process
* Less conflict management and more facilitation

Gov #2: Participation in the decision making process

People living and/or working in the region are informed, engaged and satisfied with the decision making process, and are provided with enough information to understand the consequences of decisions.

Land-use Framework 2008:

Liveable communities and recreational opportunities:

Stakeholders are fairly engaged in planning processes, which in turn improve the quality of land-use decisions and build confidence in the decision-making processes.

Provincial-scale Outcomes Identified in key Government of Alberta Policy Documents

Energy Future

1. Alberta Energy Business Plan 2008-2011 (Alberta Energy)

2.Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy (Agriculture and Rural Development)

The Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy outlines eight priority initiatives developed to achieve significant change in the industry. These changes will redirect resources to key priorities, revitalize the livestock industry, enhance the value chain and refocus efforts to achieve a sustainable and competitive livestock industry.

3. Alberta’s 2008 Climate Change Action Strategy

The three words: Responsibility/Leadership/Action describes Alberta’s new strategy for addressing the serious and world-wide challenge of climate change. Albertans want and expect their province to take the lead. Faced with difficult challenges in the past, Albertans have consistently demonstrated their willingness to use ingenuity and innovation to develop new solutions. That same commitment to leadership and action will be required to address the challenge of climate change.

4.Provincial Energy Strategy (Alberta Energy - under development)

On December 11, 2008 the Provincial Energy Strategy was announced - . The strategy is a long-term action plan for Alberta to achieve clean energy production, wise energy use and sustained economic prosperity. Implementation of the strategy by the Government of Alberta includes energy related activity by multiple Government departments over short-term, medium-term and long-term horizons.

Economic Sustainability

1. 2008-2011 GOA Strategic Business Plan

2.Land-use Framework (Sustainable Resource Development )

On December 7, 2008, the Land-use Framework was released. It sets out an approach to better manage public and private lands and natural resources to achieve Alberta’s long-term economic, environmental and social goals. The framework provides a blueprint for land use management and decision-making that addresses Alberta’s growth pressures. After further consultation (summer/fall 2008), feedback from Albertans has strengthened the Land-use Framework with key improvements. With the addition of the Efficient Use of Land strategy, another planning region, and a priority to develop legislation, the final Alberta Land-use Framework will ensure future land development considers cumulative environmental impacts as well as social and economic factors.

3.Building and Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce

Alberta’s 10-Year Strategy to build and educate tomorrow’s worksource will guide government’s investments in our people and labour market over the next ten years (2006-2016). This strategy is about increasing the education and skill level of individual Albertans, as well as fostering high performance work environments that maximize innovation and the application of new technologies and processes.

The strategy further recognizes that partnerships with a variety of stakeholders are imperative to the success of this initiative. These stakeholders include industry, business (including the private and public sectors and the public service), labour groups, professional associations, volunteer and community agencies, education and training providers, and where appropriate, other orders of government. The strategy focuses on four themes: Inform Albertans about education and labour market issues, initiatives and opportunities; Attract people to Alberta; Develop the knowledge and skills of Albertans as well as high performance work environments; and Retain people in Alberta’s workforce.

4. Agriculture and Rural Development Business Plan 2008-11

5. Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy (Agriculture and Rural Development)

The Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy outlines eight priority initiatives developed to achieve significant change in the industry. These changes will redirect resources to key priorities, revitalize the livestock industry, enhance the value chain and refocus efforts to achieve a sustainable and competitive livestock industry.

6. Finance and Enterprise Business Plan 2008-2011

This Business Plan incorporates all the entities reporting to the Minister into an integrated strategic plan that focuses on the key priorities for the Ministry.

7. Alberta’s Regional Economic Development Alliances Overview (REDA) -June 2008

The REDA overview provides a snapshot in time of some of the goals and initiatives under development across the regions of Alberta and speaks to the potential of sustainable economic prosperity for their member communities and the province as a whole.

8. Battle River Alliance for Economic Development (BRAED) Update of Marketing and Communication Strategy

The Marketing and Communications strategy has three areas of focus:

* The BRAED Brand and BRAED’s presence in the region

* A review and update of previous and current strategies that will move BRAED forward for the remainder of the current three year business plan

* A familiarization of BRAED’s activities and programs that will support the marketing and communication of BRAED’s member communities.

It is also used to enhance the competitiveness of BRAED in the current environment, and highlight the importance of strengthening relationships with members, stakeholders, partners and potential investors. The IMC Strategy is used for both regional and global audiences, across all media platforms and for the purpose of advancing BRAED’s goals and strategic vision.

9. Alberta’s Action Plan for Bringing Technology to Market

This three-year plan of wide-ranging coordinated actions aims to create sustainable knowledge-based jobs and opportunities for Albertans in our advanced technology sectors. It builds on Alberta’s strengths in the advanced technology sectors of clean energy, information and communications technology, life sciences and nanotechnology. The actions provide a supportive environment for companies to grow and become successful in world markets.

Nature of Community

1. 2008-2011 GOA Strategic Business Plan

2. Health and Wellness Business Plan 2008-2011

3. Capital Plan

This 20-year Strategic Capital Plan provides a vision for the schools, hospitals, roads, and cultural and recreational sites that greatly contribute to Albertans’ quality of life. This plan sets the broad direction that will guide our decision making, and help us stay ahead of Alberta’s growing infrastructure needs.

4. Land-use Framework (Sustainable Resource Development )

On December 7, 2008, the Land-use Framework was released. It sets out an approach to better manage public and private lands and natural resources to achieve Alberta’s long-term economic, environmental and social goals. The framework provides a blueprint for land use management and decision-making that addresses Alberta’s growth pressures. After further consultation (summer/fall 2008), feedback from Albertans has strengthened the Land-use Framework with key improvements. With the addition of the Efficient Use of Land strategy, another planning region, and a priority to develop legislation, the final Alberta Land-use Framework will ensure future land development considers cumulative environmental impacts as well as social and economic factors.

5. Tourism Mandate Letter 2008 (Tourism, Parks and Recreation)

6. The Spirit of Alberta - Alberta’s Cultural Policy (Culture and Community Spirit)

The Government of Alberta is proud of our province’s unique and vibrant culture, and want to see it continue to grow and flourish. To achieve this, we have developed the Spirit of Alberta - a cultural policy for our province. Launched in January 2008, this important policy provides a framework for decision-making related to the support, growth and development of culture as we move into our province’s second century.

7. Aboriginal Relations Business Plan

Other information

Health Action Plan

The Alberta government announced a plan on April 16 to take action on a wide range of initiatives aimed at making the province’s health care system more efficient and effective. The following is a status report on immediate, three-month and six-month initiatives.

Water Quality and Supply

1. Water for Life: Alberta’s Strategy for Sustainability

This is the Government of Alberta’s response to develop a new water management approach and outline specific strategies and actions to address these issues. In order to fulfill the goals of the strategy, and meet the specific targets set out by Albertans, the actions outlined in the Water for Life strategy revolve around three core areas of focus: knowledge and research, partnerships, water conservation. On November 18, 2008, the Alberta Government released a renewed Water for Life Strategy . The renewed strategy accelerates action to safeguard Alberta’s water sources, ensuring integration of watershed planning with regional planning under the proposed Land-use Framework, and sets clear direction and action for improved watershed management in Alberta.

2. Master Agreement on Apportionment (1969)

The governments of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Canada entered into a Master Agreement On Apportionment, for sharing the waters of eastward flowing interprovincial streams. The agreement also recognizes the problem of water quality and groundwater matters, and reconstituted the Prairie Provinces Water Board to administer the agreement and provide a forum to resolve and report on interprovincial water issues.

3.Land-use Framework (Sustainable Resource Development )

On December 7, 2008, the Land-use Framework was released. It sets out an approach to better manage public and private lands and natural resources to achieve Alberta’s long-term economic, environmental and social goals. The framework provides a blueprint for land use management and decision-making that addresses Alberta’s growth pressures. After further consultation (summer/fall 2008), feedback from Albertans has strengthened the Land-use Framework with key improvements. With the addition of the Efficient Use of Land strategy, another planning region, and a priority to develop legislation, the final Alberta Land-use Framework will ensure future land development considers cumulative environmental impacts as well as social and economic factors.

Environmental Sustainability

1. 2008-2011 GOA Strategic Business Plan

2. Land-use Framework (Sustainable Resource Development )

On December 7, 2008, the Land-use Framework was released. It sets out an approach to better manage public and private lands and natural resources to achieve Alberta’s long-term economic, environmental and social goals. The framework provides a blueprint for land use management and decision-making that addresses Alberta’s growth pressures. After further consultation (summer/fall 2008), feedback from Albertans has strengthened the Land-use Framework with key improvements. With the addition of the Efficient Use of Land strategy, another planning region, and a priority to develop legislation, the final Alberta Land-use Framework will ensure future land development considers cumulative environmental impacts as well as social and economic factors.

3.Managing the Network (Tourism, Parks and Recreation)

The long-term success of the parks and protected areas network in preserving Alberta’s natural heritage is determined in large part by the attitudes of decision-makers, staff, volunteers, the private sector, industry, visitors and the general public. The Alberta Government’s commitment to the parks and protected areas network is embodied in our vision and mission statements.

4. Clean Air Strategic Alliance Vision

The Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) was established in March 1994 as a new way to manage air quality issues in Alberta. CASA, a non-profit association, is a multi-stakeholder partnership, composed of representatives selected by industry, government and non-government organizations. Stakeholders are committed to developing and applying a comprehensive air quality management system for all Albertans. All participants of the CASA consensus-based model work towards a shared vision and mission.

5. Agriculture and Rural Development Business Plan 2008-2011

6. Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy (Agriculture and Rural Development)

The Alberta Livestock and Meat Strategy outlines eight priority initiatives developed to achieve significant change in the industry. These changes will redirect resources to key priorities, revitalize the livestock industry, enhance the value chain and refocus efforts to achieve a sustainable and competitive livestock industry.

Governance and Accountability

1. Municipal Affairs (MA) 2008-11 Business Plan

2. Land-use Framework (Sustainable Resource Development)

On December 7, 2008, the Land-use Framework was released. It sets out an approach to better manage public and private lands and natural resources to achieve Alberta’s long-term economic, environmental and social goals. The framework provides a blueprint for land use management and decision-making that addresses Alberta’s growth pressures. After further consultation (summer/fall 2008), feedback from Albertans has strengthened the Land-use Framework with key improvements. With the addition of the Efficient Use of Land strategy, another planning region, and a priority to develop legislation, the final Alberta Land-use Framework will ensure future land development considers cumulative environmental impacts as well as social and economic factors.

3. Water for Life: Alberta’s Strategy for Sustainability

This is the Government of Alberta’s response to develop a new water management approach and outline specific strategies and actions to address these issues. In order to fulfill the goals of the strategy, and meet the specific targets set out by Albertans, the actions outline in the Water for Life strategy revolve around three core areas of focus: knowledge and research, partnerships, water conservation. On November 18, 2008, the Alberta Government released arenewed Water for Life Strategy. The renewed strategy accelerates action to safeguard Alberta’s water sources, ensuring integration of watershed planning with regional planning under the proposed Land-use Framework, and sets clear direction and action for improved watershed management in Alberta.