Biochemistry

Teaching Faculty

Rachel Milner

Rachel Milner

PhD University of Cambridge
MSc in Educational Research, University of Exeter


Teaching Professor
581C Medical Sciences Building
  • Bio
    Dr. Milner’s research history includes structure/function studies on the uncoupling protein in brown adipose tissue mitochondria, on the ER protein calreticulin, and on the skeletal muscle protein dystrophin. More recently she has been conducting educational research, to complement her work on continuing improvement of the department’s undergraduate teaching program. After completing an AHFMR post-doctoral fellowship in 1993, she taught for a number of years as a sessional instructor whilst also working as a technical writer and trainer for various companies in Edmonton. She has been a full-time member of the department’s academic staff since 2000, when she was tasked with redevelopment of the department’s senior undergraduate laboratory course, BIOCH 401. In 2002, she led the design and development of a new curriculum for the undergraduate teaching program, which was implemented in 2005, and since then she has been actively working to integrate meaningful research opportunities for undergraduate students throughout the program. She currently teaches BIOCH 200, BIOCH 330, and BIOCH 401, and coordinates BIOCH 299. She is also advisor for third and fourth year students in the honors and specialization programs in biochemistry.
  • Selected Publications

    Development of a Connected Curriculum in Biochemistry at a Large, Research-Intensive University in Canada.
    Milner, R.E.
    In Developing the Higher Education Curriculum: Research-Based Education in Practice (2017). UCL Press. Carnell, B. and Fung, D., Eds. ISBN: 978‑1‑78735‑087‑8

    Learner Differences and Learning Outcomes in an Introductory Biochemistry Class: Attitude Towards Images, Visual Cognitive Skills, and Learning Approach. 
    Milner, R.E.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (2014) 42: 285-298

    Using Clickers to Improve Student Engagement and Performance in an Introductory Biochemistry Class.
    Addison S Wright A and Milner RE
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (2009) 37: 84-91

    Phosphorylation of dystrophin. The carboxyl-terminal of dystrophin is a substrate for in vitro phosphorylation by p34cdc2 protein kinase. 
    Milner RE, Busaan JL Holmes CFB, Wang JH and Michalak M
    J. Biol. Chem. (1993) 268: 21901-21905

 

Adrienne Wright

Adrienne Wright

MSc University of Birmingham
PhD University of Alberta

Teaching Professor
581A Medical Sciences Building
  • Bio
    Dr. Wright has a background in toxicology and pharmacology and has been teaching in the department since 2000. Her professional duties at the University of Alberta fall into three major categories: instruction, educational research, and course design and development.
     
    Currently, she coordinates and teaches a large multi-section introductory biochemistry class (BIOCH 200) with an annual enrollment of over 1300 students and a senior laboratory course (BIOCH 401) with an enrollment of 32 students. She is also the coordinator of the Undergraduate Research Abroad Program; students in this program have the opportunity to carry out a 6-week research project in an international laboratory.
     

 

Jonathan Parrish

PhD Dalhousie

Teaching Professor
579 Medical Sciences Building
  • Bio
    Dr. Parrish has been teaching in the Department of Biochemistry since 2006, and has been a full-time faculty member since 2007. His background is predominantly in the field of structural biology and molecular modelling of viral proteinases and their inhibitors. He currently teaches a wide variety of courses in the undergraduate program in the Department of Biochemistry, including BIOCH 200, 320, 330, 398 and 401. He is also the coordinator for the 300-level biochemistry classes and in the first and second-year advisor for students in the specialization and honors BSc program in biochemistry. He has also produced molecular/structural art for Pearson/Prentice Hall and for Oxford University Press.