Kreisel Series / Série Kreisel

 

2020 CLC Kreisel Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Listen to the 2020 Kreisel Lecture on CBC Radio "Ideas"
Watch the 2020 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

Join us on Thursday, March 12, 2020 for the 2020 CLC Kreisel Lecture with renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer, musician and artist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, who will be delivering her original lecture titled: A Short History of the Blockade: Giant Beavers, Diplomacy & Regeneration in Nishnaabewin.

“This lecture uses Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg stories, storytelling aesthetics and practices to explore the generative nature of Indigenous blockades through our relative, the beaver or in Nishnaabemowin, amik.  Moving through genres, shifting through time, amikwag stories become a lens for the life-giving possibilities of dams and the world-building possibilities of blockades, deepening our understanding of Indigenous resistance, as a negation and an affirmation.”

The lecture will be recorded by CBC Radio One “Ideas,” and will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Her work breaks open the intersections between politics,  story, and song, bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity.

Working for over a decade as an independent scholar using Nishnaabeg intellectual practices, Leanne has lectured and taught extensively at universities across Canada and has twenty years of experience with Indigenous land-based education. She holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba, and teaches at the Dechinta Centre for Research & Learning in Denendeh.  Her latest book, As We Have Always Done:  Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance was published by the University of Minnesota Press in the fall of 2017, and was awarded Best Subsequent Book by the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.

Leanne was named the inaugural RBC Charles Taylor Emerging writer by Thomas King in 2014 and in 2017/18 she was a finalist in the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Trillium Book Award. She has published extensive fiction and poetry in both book and magazine form. Her second book of short stories and poetry, This Accident of Being Lost is a follow-up to the acclaimed Islands of Decolonial Love in Spring 2017.

Leanne is Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg and a member of Alderville First Nation.

Thursday, March 12, 2020 | 7:30 PM | Pay What You Can

Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta

 

2019 CLC Kreisel Lecture with Dionne Brand

Watch the 2019 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

Don’t miss the 2019 CLC Kreisel Lecture to be delivered by Dionne Brand. Internationally acclaimed poet and novelist Dionne Brand, winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize and the Governor General’s Award, will give a lecture titled “An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading.” Brand will be introduced by bestselling author Lawrence Hill.

Brand’s talk takes up her reading of early and persistent narratives that mark and spectacularise Black being. She explores what it means to write back to, or against, dominant colonial, imperialist, and racist tropes, and how, finally, a Black poetics can be a remedy for narrative.

The CLC continues its commitment to maintaining the legacy of Henry Kreisel through its annual CLC Kreisel Lecture series. A forum for open, inclusive critical thinking and cultural engagement, the CLC Kreisel Lecture series is a tribute to Henry Kreisel himself. Past presenters in the series include Michael Crummey, Heather O’Neill, Lynn Coady, Tomson Highway, Esi Edugyan, Lawrence Hill, and Eden Robinson. Like the twelve previous CLC Kreisel Lectures, Brand’s talk will be published in the CLC Kreisel Lecture Series by the University of Alberta Press, in the same fashion as the CBC Massey Lecture Series. The lecture will be recorded and broadcast by CBC Radio One “Ideas.” Bestselling author Lawrence Hill will introduce Brand’s lecture.

Dionne Brand’s literary credentials are legion. Her 2010 book of poetry, Ossuaries, won the Griffin Poetry Prize, and her other accolades include the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the Pat Lowther Memorial Award. Her novel In Another Place, Not Here was selected as a NYT Book Review Notable Book and a Best Book by the Globe and Mail; At the Full and Change of the Moon was selected a Best Book by the LA Times and What We All Long For won the Toronto Book Award. In 2006, Brand was awarded the Harbourfront Festival Prize for her contribution to the world of books and writing, and was Toronto’s Poet Laureate from 2009 to 2012. In 2017, she was named to the Order of Canada, and 2018 saw the publication of two new titles: Theory and The Blue Clerk. Brand is a Professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph. She lives in Toronto.

A reception and book signing will follow. Books will be sold by Glass Bookshop.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 | 7:30 PM
Timms Centre for the Arts
87 Avenue, 112 St NW, Edmonton, AB
Edmonton, AB

 

2018 CLC Kreisel Lecture: Michael Crummey

Listen to the 2018 Kreisel Lecture on CBC Radio "Ideas"
Watch the 2018 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The past twenty-five years have witnessed the flowering of a Newfoundland literature that has had a significant presence on the national and international stage. The place and its people have featured in the work of writers such as Annie Proulx, Wayne Johnston and Lisa Moore, all of whom have been published to acclaim in countries around the world. The emergence of a significant body of fiction in which Newfoundland’s culture and history figures prominently has done much to influence the image of Newfoundland that people from the province and in the outside world “see.” And it has also raised niggling questions about the use of history and real-life figures to animate fictional stories. Is there a limit to the liberties a writer can take with the real world? Is there a point at which a fictionalization of history becomes a falsification of history? What responsibilities do writers have to their readers, and to the historical and cultural materials they exploit as sources?

Using Newfoundland and its recent literature as a case study, and drawing on Michael Crummey’s own experience appropriating historical characters to fictional ends, “Most of What Follows is True” is an examination of the complex relationship between fact and fiction, between the “real world” and the stories we tell to explain the world to ourselves.

Date: April 12, 2018

Time: 7:30 pm

Place: The Timms Centre for the Arts (87th Avenue and 112th Street NW, University of Alberta campus)

Price: Pay What You Can

 

2017 CLC Kreisel Lecture | Heather O’Neill

Heather O'Neill on CBC Radio
Watch the 2017 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Education. On unusual muses and mentors. And how I had to teach myself everything in order to cross the class divide.”

The 2017 CLC Kreisel Lecture will be delivered by two-time Giller Prize-shortlisted writer Heather O’Neill, author of LULLABIES FOR LITTLE CRIMINALS, THE GIRL WHO WAS SATURDAY NIGHT, DAYDREAMS OF ANGELS, and the new THE LONELY HEARTS HOTEL. Her lecture is titled: “My Education. On unusual muses and mentors. And how I had to teach myself everything in order to cross the class divide.” Writer and scholar Kit Dobson will deliver the introduction. This pay-what-you-can event will be followed by a reception and a book signing.

Thursday, March 9, 2017 | 7:30 PM | Timms Centre for the Arts | Pay-what-you-can | Reception & signing to follow.

 

2016 CLC Kreisel Lecture with Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood on CBC Radio Ideas
Watch the 2016 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture is the CLC’s most prestigious annual public event. The lectures are co-published in the “Kreisel Series” by the Canadian Literature Centre and the University of Alberta Press. For 2016, the CLC has invited Margaret Atwood.

When: April 7, 2016 7:30 PM

Where: Winspear Centre

“WHAT DID WE THINK WE WERE DOING…”
… we young writers of Canada?”  That’s a question Margaret Atwood asked during a Canadian Literature Centre talk in Edmonton.  In excerpts from the talk and in conversation with Paul Kennedy, she considers the accidental but sometimes intentional creation of a culture and a tradition.  Some things were unimaginable decades ago, like the diversity and strength of Canadian literature today…or the PowerPoint she uses to help tell the tale.

 

2015 CLC Kreisel Lecture with Lynn Coady: Who Needs Books?

Lynn Coady on CBC Radio "Ideas"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction by Paul Kennedy, host of CBC Ideas. This event will be recorded by CBC Radio One.

The Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture is the CLC’s most prestigious annual public event. The lectures are co-published in the “Kreisel Series” by the Canadian Literature Centre and the University of Alberta Press. For 2015, the CLC has invited Lynn Coady. She is a Canadian novelist, journalist and TV writer, originally from Cape Breton Island, NS, now dividing her time between Edmonton and Toronto. Her collection of short stories Hellgoing won the 2013 Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her 2011 novel, The Antagonist, was shortlisted for the 2011 Giller Prize and published by Alfred A. Knopf in the USA in January, 2013. Her fiction has also been published in the UK, Germany, Holland and France. Recently her short story “Mr. Hope” appeared in issue #47 of McSweeny’s Quarterly.

All are cordially invited to attend this spectacular event. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture.

 When: April 13, 2015 7:30 PM

Where: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta

 

2014 Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture with Tomson Highway

Watch the 2014 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture is the CLC’s most prestigious annual public event.

The lectures are co-published in the “Kreisel Series” by the Canadian Literature Centre and the University of Alberta Press. For 2014, the CLC has invited playwright and novelist Tomson Highway, who enjoys an international career as a playwright, novelist, and pianist/songwriter. He is considered one of this country’s foremost Indigenous voices. He is best known for his award-winning plays, The Rez Sisters (1986), Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing (1989), Rose (2000), and Ernestine Shuswap   

Gets Her Trout (2005) as well as his critically -acclaimed novel, Kiss of the Fur Queen (1998).

All are cordially invited to attend this spectacular event of talk and music. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture.

When: March 6, 2014 7:30 PM

Where: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta

 

2013 Henry Kreisel Commemorative Lecture by Esi Edugyan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre is committed to ensuring Henry Kreisel’s legacy through this annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. The series is a forum for open, inclusive critical thinking and is a tribute to Henry Kreisel himself. Past presenters include Joseph Boyden, Wayne Johnston, Dany Laferrière, Eden Robinson, Annabel Lyon and Lawrence Hill.

This year, the CLC is pleased to announce Esi Edugyan as the 2013 Kreisel lecturer, with an Introduction by Marina Endicott. A reception and book signing will follow. All are welcome, entrance is free and no RSVP required.

Esi Edugyan’s most recent novel, Half Blood Blues, won the 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize for Fiction. It was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers Trust Fiction Prize, and was longlisted for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction. Edugyan has held fellowships in the US, Scotland, Iceland, Germany, Hungary, Finland, Spain, and Belgium. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia with her husband and daughter.

Time: 7:30pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta (Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.)

 

2012 Henry Kreisel Commemorative Lecture by Lawrence Hill

Watch the 2012 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre is committed to ensuring Henry Kreisel’s legacy through this annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. The series is a forum for open, inclusive critical thinking and is a tribute to Henry Kreisel himself. Past presenters include Joseph Boyden, Wayne Johnston, Dany Laferrière, Eden Robinson and Annabel Lyon.

This year, the CLC is pleased to announce Lawrence Hill as the 2012 Kreisel lecturer. A reception and book signing will follow. All are welcome, entrance is free and no RSVP required.

An award-winning Canadian novelist and memoirist, Lawrence Hill is the son of American immigrants — a black father and a white mother — who came to Canada the day after they married in 1953 in Washington, D.C. Hill was greatly influenced by his parents’ work in the human rights movement, and much of his writing touches on issues of identity and belonging. Formerly a reporter with The Globe and Mail and parliamentary correspondent for The Winnipeg Free Press, Hill is the author of three novels, including Some Great Thing (HarperCollins Canada, 1992), Any Known Blood (HarperCollins Canada, 1997), and The Book of Negroes (HarperCollins Canada, 2007), which was longlisted for the Giller Prize and won the 2007 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the 2008 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the 2008 Evergreen Award (presented by the Ontario Library Association), and the 2009 edition of Canada Reads. The Book of Negroes was published in the U.S. under the title, Someone Knows My Name. Hill has also written numerous essays and non-fiction works, and received a 2005 National Magazine Award for best essay for “Is Africa’s Pain Black America’s Burden?”, published in The Walrus. He also penned the screenplay for Seeking Salvation, a documentary film about the Black church in Canada, which won the American Wilbur Award for best national television documentary in 2005.

Time: 7:30pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta (Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.)

 

2011 Henry Kreisel Commemorative Lecture by Annabel Lyon

Watch the 2011 Kreisel Lecutre on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre is committed to ensuring Henry Kreisel’s legacy through this annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. The series is a forum for open, inclusive critical thinking and is a tribute to Henry Kreisel himself. Past presenters include Joseph Boyden, Wayne Johnston, Dany Laferrière and Eden Robinson.

This year, the CLC is pleased to announce Annabel Lyon as the 2011 Kreisel lecturer. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture. All are welcome, entrance is free and no RSVP required.

Annabel Lyon is a Vancouver fiction writer and teacher. Her first books are Oxygen (2000), and The Best Thing for You (2004), which was nominated for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. The Golden Mean (2009), her first novel and third work of fiction, holds the distinction of being the only book nominated that year for all three of Canada’s major fiction prizes: the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General’s Award for English language fiction and the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the last of which it won. The Golden Mean was also nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, and is being published in six languages. Given its provocative book cover, it was banned from BC Ferries in 2010, has earned international critical acclaim, and has become a Canadian bestseller. It was recently named the Grant MacEwan University Book of the Year.

Time: 7:30pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta. Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.

 

2010 Henry Kreisel Commemorative Lecture by Eden Robinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre is committed to ensuring Henry Kreisel’s legacy through this annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. The series is a forum for open, inclusive critical thinking and is a tribute to Henry Kreisel himself. Past presenters include Joseph Boyden, Wayne Johnston and Dany Laferrière.

This year, the CLC is pleased to announce Eden Robinson as the 2010 Kreisel lecturer. A reception and book signing will follow the lecture. All are welcome, entrance is free and no RSVP required.

Eden Robinson is the internationally acclaimed author of Traplines, Monkey Beach and Blood Sports. Traplines was the winner of the New York Times Notable Book of the Year and Britain’s Winfred Holtby Memorial Prize. Monkey Beach was nominated for the Giller Prize, the 2000 Governor General’s Award for Fiction, and was selected as the Globe and Mail’s Editor’s Choice. Robinson is a member of the Haisla and Heiltsuk First Nations. “I was born on the same day as Edgar Allan Poe and Dolly Parton: January 19. I am absolutely certain that this affects my writing in some way.” – Eden Robinson

Time: 7:30pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta. Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.

 

2009 Henry Kreisel Lecture presented by Dany Laferrière

Watch the 2009 Kreisel Lecture on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre / Centre de littérature Canadienne at the University of Alberta invites you to the 2009 Kreisel Lecture, presented by Dany Laferrière.

About the author: Unconventional, controversial, prolific and immensely talented, Dany Laferrière was born in Haïti and adopted Québec as his new home. He achieved critical fame with his first novel, How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired. With humour and clarity, his work examines Haitian, Quebec and North American society and inter-racial relationships.

Time: 7:30 pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta. Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.

 

2008 Kreisel Lecture Presented by Wayne Johnston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Literature Centre / Centre de littérature Canadienne at the University of Alberta invites you to the 2008 Kreisel Lecture, presented by Wayne Johnston.

Wayne Johnston was born and raised in Goulds, Newfoundland. He obtained a BA in English from Memorial University and worked as a reporter for the St. John’s Daily News before deciding to devote himself full-time to creative writing. Since then Johnston has written seven books and has been a contributing editor for The Walrus. His first book, The Story of Bobby O’Malley, won the WH Smith/Books in Canada First Novel Award. Baltimore’s Mansion, a memoir dealing with his grandfather, his father, and himself, was tremendously well-received and won the prestigious Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction. His novels The colony of Unrequited Dreams and The Navigator of New York spent extended periods of time on bestseller lists in Canada and have been published in the US, Britain, Germany, Holland, China and Spain. Colony was also identified by The Globe and Mail as one of the 100 most important Canadian books ever produced. Johnston divides his time between Toronto and Roanoke, Virginia, where he has held the Distinguished Chair in Creative Writing at Hollins University since 2004.

Time: 7:30pm

Place: Timms Centre for the Arts, University of Alberta. Corner of 87 Ave. & 112 St.

 

2007 Henry Kreisel Lecture presented by Joseph Boyden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please join us for the CLC’s annual flagship event, the 2007 Henry Kreisel Lecture. This year’s lecturer will be Joseph Boyden, acclaimed author of the prize-winning novel Three Day Road.

Mr. Boyden’s lecture will explore the similarities and differences between Northern Ontario and Louisiana including the social ills of these two different places and the similar social fabric of two cultures–New Orleans African American and Native Canadian.

The event is being co-sponsored by Canadian Literature Centre and the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta.

Reception and book-signing to follow! Everyone is welcome to this, and admission is free!

Time: from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

Place: Convocation Hall at the University of Alberta