Study Abroad

Course Offerings

Course offerings for Winter 2019 below. 

All School in Cortona courses include field trips. Please note that the syllabi and field trips associated with the courses are subject to change depending on unforeseen emergencies and extraordinary current events. It is recommended that students limit any extensive travel plans to before the start of or after the end of the academic schedule. Due to the intensive nature of the School in Cortona, it is expected that students participate in all the classes in which they are registered and associated field trips. More than one absence from a class could result in a participation mark of zero.

Spring I 2018 (April 29 – May 25)

Time

Monday/Wednesday

Field Trip Day

8:30-11:30

Marco Pacioni

HADVC 211

Friday

11:45-2:45

Marko Zivkovic

ANTHR 485

Tuesday

3:00-6:00

Alessandro Celani

CLASS 299

Thursday

ANTHR 485 (*3) Italianness Through Food & Gesture

What we eat and how we comport ourselves are some of the most frequent features we use to distinguish ourselves from other groups, and there is hardly a better example of how food and gesture constitute regional and national identity than that of Italy. Starting with the exemplary way modern Italianness has been constituted through food and gesture, we will explore a number of core anthropological themes, such as the famous North-South axis of Italian regional stereotyping, and how it gets involved in forming larger Italian identity, esp. through its large North American diaspora. We will study food as a classification system and the visceral reactions to transgressing of its categories (or why you can’t eat risotto with spaghetti). We will travel in Tuscany and beyond to investigate how local food (i.e. olive oil, wine, cheese, pasta, etc.) gets used in self-promotion and construction of authenticity. We will finally explore how Italians behave in public spaces and how bodily habits helps societies remember. Throughout the course, and especially during the field trips, students will practice their “ethnographic sensibility” through a series of playful exercises that rely on different senses to develop acute receptivity to the nuances of everyday life. Field-trips to Perugia (May 8th), Cortona (May 15), and Rome (May 22). Prerequisites waived.

CLASS 299 (*3) Themes in Roman Imperial Art 

Did the Romans have their own art? They were supreme builders but what about visual art? Was it just an attempt at emulating the Greeks? This course investigates what in Roman art is truly Roman: power, memory, tradition. Roman art is basic and inevitable at once. It is made of simple things carefully displayed: the human body, architecture, and nature. Constant links to the present are the core of the course. Much of Roman art is in our own visual expressions: cinema, photography, commercials. This is a course on the past but mainly on how it forged our present. Field-trips to Rome (May 3), Orvieto (May 10), and Perugia (May 17). Prerequisites waived.

INT D 325/HADVC 211 (*3) The Renaissance City 

A study of the elements that contributed to the conception and construction of the Italian Renaissance city, focusing on the changes in medieval cities before and after the Black Plague and on the new architectonic elements of the Renaissance such as squares, gardens, palaces, villas, aqueducts, fountains, open galleries, public monuments, domes, theaters in order to follow the social and urban evolution of cities such as Florence, Rome, including the ideal cities that have been built or only planned. Urban spaces and their usages by different social groups  in terms of gender differences are discussed. Field-trips to Arezzo (May 4), Florence (May 11), and Rome (May 18). Prerequisites waived. 

 

Spring II 2018 (May 27 – June 22)

Time

Monday/Wednesday

Field Trip Day

     

11:45-2:45

Ruth Dyck Fehderau

WRITE 399

Thursday

3:00-6:00

Alessandro Celani

HIST 300

Friday

 

WRITE 399 (*3) Creative Non-Fiction Writing: The Art and Craft of Travel Writing

Travel writing is about the craft and techniques of storytelling, about articulating the clashes and incongruences travelers encounter – clashes between their own expectations and the reality that greets them, between cultures, between locals and the visitors passing through who peek into but never fully understand nuances of local life, between assumptions of personal space, and, obviously, between languages. Travel writers must write from the vantage point of the outsider experiencing emotional jolts and disconnects and exclusion, of the one who records without fully understanding nuance in the surrounding culture, the one who above all must resist easy stereotypes and reductive characterization. Field-trips Cortona (May 31), Rome (June 7), and Florence (June 14). Prerequisites waived.

HIST 300 (*3) Art and Culture in Fascist Italy

There is no theme in our time which is more relevant than the relationship between leaders and the masses. More and more it happens to be a theatrical relationship. The masses seem to be fascinated with heroic figures. It was no different in Fascist Italy. Art, architecture, literature, and music played a major role in the promotion and the success of Fascist ideals. They obsessively celebrated Mussolini as the body of the nation, as a superhuman leader, as a statue made of blood and flesh. This course gives students a chance to study not only how visual propaganda was set up in Fascist times, but how it is still at work where we would never expect to find it. Field-trips Rome (June 1), Perguia (June 8), and Orvieto (June 15). Prerequisites waived.

Winter 2019 (January 14 – March 22)

INT D 125 (*3) Introduction to Italian Language and Culture

This course will give you the basic skills to communicate effectively in your daily interactions and travel while also introducing you to Italian culture to provide a better appreciation of the similarities and differences between Italy and Canada. Not open to students with credit in ITAL 111/112 or any higher level Italian course. 

INT D 325: Power and Visual Arts in Fascist Italy:

History has always been plagued by struggle and conflict and our current world is full of violence and brutality. Political leaders and artists have always faced such issues and opportunities. They have had to interpret the present and the past and propose solutions or alternative scenarios for the future. One of these historical periods is Italian Fascism, from the 1920s to early 1940s. This course will analyze the new visions of power and propaganda in Fascist Italy and how the entire visual vocabulary of Italy was recreated to celebrate past Italian heroes and genius. Great men such as Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Bernini, Machiavelli and Lorenzo de Medici were idolized during this period. This course will compare how these dynamics still affect our own world and how our leaders use history to build up their public image and inform their policies.

CLASS 399 (*3) The Archaeology of Ancient Italy: From Greeks to Romans

A survey of the archaeology of ancient Italy from ca. 800 BC to 200 AD. Focused on the cultures of Ancient Italy including: the Greek colonies in Southern Italy, the Etruscans in Central Italy, the indigenous people in inland areas and of the Romans who unified all of Italy. Ancient Italy was the foundation of the Renaissance, the concept of Western Civilization, and of the country today. Weekend field trips to the Greek and then Roman colony at Poseidonia/Paestum and to the Roman cities of Pompei and Herculaneum will help us to understand not only the ancient world but also how, what and why modern societies remember through museums and the use/restoration of ancient sites today. Prerequisites waived.

HADVC 211 (*3) Renaissance City: 

A study of the elements that contributed to the conception and construction of the Italian Renaissance city, focusing on the changes in medieval cities before and after the Black Plague and on the new architectonic elements of the Renaissance such as squares, gardens, palaces, villas, aqueducts, fountains, open galleries, public monuments, domes, theaters in order to follow the social and urban evolution of cities such as Florence, Rome, including the ideal cities that have been built or only planned. Urban spaces and their usages by different social groups  in terms of gender differences are discussed. Prerequisites waived. Prerequisites waived.  

 

HIST 300 (*3) The Grand Tour European Culture toward the Italian Landscape and Arts

The course  considers the main elements of the Grand Tour and its cultural and political elaborations in Europe, focusing on significant works of artists and writers mostly from the 18th and 19th century who traveled to Italy and contributed to establish the aesthetical paradigm of the Italian landscape with its archaeological sites, the cities, the monuments, and the habits of local populations. The previous heritage of Italian humanists to the Grand Tour and its later transformations into the pop-culture of modern tourism will be considered. Prerequisites waived. 

SOC 402: The Italian Mafia:

“Mafia” is one of the terms which, like “pizza” and “spaghetti”, are identified with Italy and which contributed to the rise of many stereotypes. The aim of the course is to examine organized crime in Italy in historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its growth from the nineteenth century to the present. Students will learn the complexity of this phenomenon, beyond the mystified representations which are very common in popular culture.The course analyzes sociological aspects of the mafia including language, message systems, the “code of silence,” the role of violence, structures of power  and how it interacts with women. The course also pays attention to the following issues: Mafia involvementin legal and illegal markets, Mafia political implications and relations with others institutions namely the Catholic Church. Italy will be compared both to those countries where Italian mafia groups migrated by the beginning of last century - such as the United States and Canadawhere the Italian crime organizations infiltration is a more recent issue. Prerequisites waived. 

MLCS 299 (*3): This course is still being finalized. 


T. B. D. 
T. B. D.