Electrical Engineering Activity Box

Learn all about electricity!
Related Engineering Disciplines: Electrical Engineering
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Engineering Activity Box Extensions and Tips

Paperclip Circuits: How would you include a switch in the different circuits? What happens if you connect the switch in different places in the circuit?

Conductive Creature: How long of a conducting dough rope can you make? Does the shape of the dough influence your circuit? You can also try making your own dough.

Surgery Training Game: Try using other small insulating objects you find in your house instead of the pony beads. Are they easier or harder to pick up?

Jocelyn Bachman

Jocelyn Bachman

Jocelyn is a scientist who enjoys solving problems, large and small! She works at Applied Nanotools, has an undergraduate degree in Engineering Physics, and a PhD in Physics. Jocelyn works on a technology called silicon photonics. This technology is used to make paths for light to travel in different directions on a chip. It sounds simple, but the hard part is that these paths are made from nanotechnology and are about 100 times smaller than a single hair! During a normal day, Jocelyn designs or measures new devices, helps customers with scientific problems, and develops new features or products.

What made you want to study electrical engineering?
I actually studied engineering physics, which is a combination of electrical engineering and physics. I wanted to learn how things like computers work, and also why they work the way they do. Electrical engineering teaches the "how" and physics teaches the "why". It was the perfect combination!

What do you think is the future of electrical engineering?
Electrical engineering continues to push the boundaries of what is possible. In my area of electrical engineering, which is nanotechnology, people are constantly making things smaller, faster, and more powerful. However, the old ways that people used to do this are not working anymore, and people are getting very creative with how we can make things faster and smaller. I think in the future we will see more devices that use light, instead of electricity, to send information.

If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life what would it be?
Seafood Linguine

Want to learn more about Jocelyn and electrical engineering? Check out the following social media sites and recommended resources!
Jocelyn: LinkedIn
Other Resources:https://www.synopsys.com/optical-solutions/learn/optics-for-kids.html ; https://www.nanofab.ualberta.ca/general-information/tour-requests/ ; https://www.optics4kids.org/home

 

Maisaa Naser Eddin

Maisaa Naser Eddin

Maisaa is an Electrical Engineer from Syria. Since she was a child, she had a passion for learning new subjects, especially related to science and space. She studied electrical engineering back home and worked there for 2 years. She came to Canada with her family 4 years ago. She decided to build her career path in Canada, so she started to take English courses to improve her language. Later, she joined a bridging program for engineers who are educated out of Canada, in order to update her engineering knowledge and be ready to work here. Her future plan is to get a master’s degree in renewable energy engineering.

What is your favourite project you've ever worked on and why?
My favorite project was installing digital meters for industrial customers. It was the first project I worked on after graduation, and my first time using digital meters back in Syria.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
Working as an electrical engineer in Canada and achieving a master's degree.

What is your favourite movie?
Sonic the Hedgehog

 

Naomi Hodge

Naomi Hodge

Naomi graduated from the University of Alberta and has worked in the telecommunications industry as well as the construction industry. She is now a Microwave Engineer at TELUS and is responsible for designing and building microwave networks across the country. One of her favorite things about electrical engineering is that there are so many interesting paths to explore.

What made you want to study electrical engineering?
I fell into it by accident - I had applied to civil engineering but ended up in electrical engineering. I have always loved physics and it turned out to be the perfect fit! I didn't realize how many different careers there are in electrical engineering and how applicable it is to everyday life. There is so much to learn and so many different paths you can take.

What is your proudest accomplishment?
I felt very proud when I had the opportunity to stamp my first drawing and take responsibility for my own design.

What did you want to be when you were a child?
I always loved building tree forts and I originally wanted to be an architect or a civil engineer.

 

Rachelle Lee

Rachelle LEe

Rachelle recently completed her third year of Electrical Engineering at the University
of Alberta. Before this, she worked in the science communication and education fields in Saskatchewan. From May 2020 - April 2021, Rachelle will be completing an internship with Shell at their Scotford site as part of the Electrical Engineering team.

What is your proudest accomplishment?
Making the “scary” choice to start my adult life over at 27 and moving away from all my friends and family to study engineering at the University of Alberta.

What do you think is the future of electrical engineering?
I think the scope of electrical engineering will only continue to expand and grow, especially in the short term. Our world will become more and more digital, and will rely more and more on uninterruptible power supplies. Electrical engineers will be on the teams figuring out how to make those areas work with the resources they have available to them.

What is your favorite children’s movie?
Disney’s “Tangled”!

Want to learn more about electrical engineering? Check out the following recommended resources!
Other Resources: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

 

Ryan Yeung

Ryan Yeung

Ryan is currently in his second year of electrical engineering at the University of Alberta. He enjoys taking early morning strolls around campus and, in simpler times, you can find him studying in the upper floors of the CCIS building. In his spare time, he is an avid computer builder and is a part of AlbertaSat's mission design team, a student group that specializes in sending satellites into outer space. Ryan also finds time to volunteer with initiatives like DiscoverE and SciFUN because they help promote STEM learning among the next generation of leaders!

What made you want to study electrical engineering?
My passion for electrical engineering evolved from me finding a general interest in tinkering with computer parts, doing projects with Arduino PCB (Printed Circuit Board) kits, and playing with simple wooden circuits. I just really enjoyed the sense of accomplishment I felt when something like an LED lit up in a circuit correctly or the joy when a computer booted up after building it from scratch.

What do you think is the future of electrical engineering?
Especially in the current times, everyday there seems to be some next-level innovation being made across engineering in general. It's really inspiring to hear about and the future is indeed very bright. In terms of electrical engineering, the future is definitely leaning towards implementing nano-tech and how we can use these technologies to solve both biological and industrial problems.

What did you want to be when you were a child?
Like everyone else at the time, I wanted to be a Pokemon trainer but my love for technology and innovation steered me towards pursuing a career in engineering.

Want to learn more about electrical engineering? Check out the following recommended resources!
Other Resources: SmarterEveryday ; Linus Tech Tips ; Mark Rober

 

Sahar Ali

Sahar Ali

Sahar graduated from the University of Alberta (UAlberta) with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (co-op program) in the spring of 2020. While at the UAlberta, she held two executive positions for Diversity in Engineering. She also volunteered as a mentor for the Females in Engineering Mentorship (FEM) Program. Since graduating, she has started her career with TELUS in the Graduate and Technology Leadership Program (GTLP). She is currently working on a team that does quality assurance testing for customer home equipment, such as modems and network access hubs.

What is your favourite project that you’ve ever worked on, and why?
I think my capstone project was my favourite project so far. It was really cool because we got to actually design and build physical electronics, as well as write all the code for it. It was very hands-on and it was satisfying when it all came together in the end. We had a working prototype that we had built from start to finish.

What do you think is the future of electrical engineering?
The possibilities are endless! That’s what is so cool about it. But if I had to pick something tangible, I would say renewable energy and telecommunications are both fields that are growing rapidly right now.

What is your favorite thing about your career?
It’s very technical, so there’s always a new challenge everyday that keeps it interesting.

Want to learn more about Sahar and electrical engineering? Check out the following social media sites and recommended resources!
Sahar: LinkedIn
Other Resources: Internet Protocol Facts for Kids

 

Sarah Prior

Sarah Prior

Sarah completed a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering at the University of Alberta and took a job at BC Hydro upon graduation. Since then she has worked mainly in hydroelectric generation, working to maintain the Revelstoke Dam and Powerhouse. More recently, she has worked managing construction for major equipment replacement at Bridge River Powerhouse, and as a part of the Owner’s Engineering Team for the Site C Project. Outside of work she enjoys spending time with her foster cats, and enjoying Vancouver.

What made you want to study electrical engineering?
I participated in the WISEST Summer Research Program in grade 11 working in a materials engineering lab. The work was cool and I learned how engineers apply science in a way that improves our lives (looking at new materials for prosthetics and how the body would react to them). I chose electrical engineering specifically because of all of the exciting new things being done with electricity and electronics, like phones, self-driving cars, and giant manufacturing facilities. Studying electrical engineering meant I could be a part of that future.

What is your favourite project that you’ve ever worked on, and why?
One of my favourite projects I worked on was looking into using Power Voltage Transformers (PVTs) instead of diesel generators as backup power for substations (an important part of a city’s power system). Diesel generators are great for some applications, but being able to use something that was already present (transmission lines) instead of diesel fuel was less expensive and good for the environment.

If you could only eat one meal for the rest of your life what would it be?
I really like tacos. If I could have an endless pile of taco fillings and tortillas I’d be happy.

Want to learn more about Sarah? Check out the following social media sites!
Sarah: LinkedIn

 

Steven Knudsen

Steven Knudsen

A graduate of the U of A in Engineering and Applied Sciences in Medicine, Steven has worked in technology for more than 35 years. He has worked on projects all over the world from satellite to health care, automotive to communications, and much else. For the past number of years he has volunteered on campus to help students pursue and realize their own passion projects, everything from learning programming to starting a company.

What is your favourite project that you’ve ever worked on, and why?
I worked for a startup developing what became WiFi. It was a lot of fun, worked with great people, and know that billions of people use the technology every day.

What do you think is the future of electrical engineering?
There is no one future. If starting now, I'd focus on custom/designer materials to create new electronic devices.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
Mentoring students at the U of A

Want to learn more about Steven and electrical engineering? Check out the following social media sites and recommended resources!
Steven: LinkedIn ; Hackaday
Other Resources: EEVblog ; The Signal Path ; w2aew ; ElectroBoom

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