Classics 300 Level

Undergraduate Level Courses

**The 300-level courses build on the 200-level courses and have suitable prerequisites

 

CLASS 303 - Religion in Greco-Roman Antiquity *3 (3-0-0)

Description: Examination of the nature of pre-Christian religious practices in antiquity.  The development from Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity of warfare, both in its technical aspects and as a political and socio-cultural phenomenon.  Pre-requisite:  Any CLASS 103, 104, or any CLASS course at the 200 level or above or HIST 295 or 296.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

F18 71874 LEC A1 MWF 13:00-13:50 T B 129 Stewart, Selina

CLASS 321 - Literature and Culture of the Greek World  *3 (3-0-0)

Description: Representative works of Latin and Greek literature and their cultural context. All readings in English. Prerequisite: CLASS 102, 221 or consent of Department.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W19 95690 LEC B1 MWF 11:00-11:50 TBW 2 MacFarlane, Kelly

CLASS 355 - Topics in Roman Civilization *3 (3-0-0)

Title: TBA

Description: Examination of one aspect of the Classical Roman World. (Emphasis in any one year may be archaeological, historical or literary). 

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W19 91898 LEC B1 TR 12:30-13:50 T 1 90 Rossiter, Jeremy

CLASS 356 - Topics in Ancient Art  *3 (3-0-0)

Prerequisite:are waived and this course is open to all.  If you have difficulty registering, please contact the office of History and Classics histclass@ualberta.ca 

Title: Roman Art: Failure or Triumph?

Description:This class will focus on the uneasy relationship art historians have had with Roman art, especially in comparison to Greek art. The Romans clearly knew and understood the evolution of Greek art and  we know many Greek works of art only through excellent Roman "copies". Why, then, does so much of the art produced in Rome utterly fail to rise to the Greek level of aesthetic achievement? Were Roman artists really that bad?

In this course, we will survey the evolution of Roman art from its origins to the early imperial period, comparing and contrasting it with the parallel developments in Greek art. We will find that much of the scholarly unease with Roman art is grounded in basic, unspoken, but also untenable assumptions about art. You will be surprised to see how many of those assumptions are still common today.
 

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

F18 72479 LEC A2 MWF 12:00-12:50 TBA Hijmans, Steven