Classics 300 Level

Undergraduate Level Courses

**The 300-level courses build on the 200-level courses and have suitable prerequisites

**Please follow Bear Tracks for the most updated information

CLASS 303 - Religion in Greco-Roman Antiquity *3 (3-0-0) 

Description: Examination of the nature of pre-Christian religious practices in antiquity.  The development from Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity of warfare, both in its technical aspects and as a political and socio-cultural phenomenon.  Pre-requisite:  Any CLASS 103, 104, or any CLASS course at the 200 level or above or HIST 295 or 296.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

FA19 72810 Lec A1 MWF 1300-1350 T 1 105 S. Stewart

CLASS 322 - Literature and Culture of the Roman World *3 (3-0-0)

Description: Representative works of Latin and Greek literature and their cultural context. All readings in English. Prerequisite: CLASS 102, 221 or consent of Department.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W20 95766  Lec B1 MWF 1200-12050 T 1 90 K. MacFarlane

CLASS 330 - From Alexander the Great to Cleopatra: The Hellenistic World *3 (3-0-0)

This class is on the list of approved UAlberta Global Courses that count towards the Certificate in International Learning.

Description: After the sudden death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, his commanders carved up his newly-acquired empire among themselves. No sooner had they done so, then these self-styled Successors to Alexander began to engage in decades of bloody internecine conflict, each of them attempting to wrest control of the empire as a whole from the others and rule it himself. When the death of the old warrior Antigonus the One-Eyed at the Battle of Ipsus made it clear that no one person would inherit Alexander’s empire, the Successors carved out personal kingdoms for themselves and developed new royal ideologies to justify and legitimize their rule, until eventually they were divided and conquered by the Roman juggernaut. We will examine a number of (related) historical questions: Was Alexander the Great poisoned? Who stole Alexander’s body? What happened to Alexander’s sons? Why did no one inherit Alexander’s empire? Why were all the Successors good-looking? What happened to the Athenian democracy under the Successors? What did the Greeks think of their Macedonian overlords? Why did the Ptolemies marry their sisters? Why were many of the Ptolemies obese? Can we distinguish fact from fiction in the love story of Antony and Cleopatra? Original documents will be read in translation.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W20 96628  Lec B1  MWF 1000-1050 BUS B 5 F. Pownall

CLASS 355 - Topics in the Roman Civilization - *3 (3-0-0)

Prerequisite:are waived and this course is open to all.  If you have difficulty registering, please contact the office of History and Classics histclass@ualberta.ca 

Topic Title: The Problem of Etruscan Arts  

Description: Etruscan Art is often treated as an afterthought in Histories of Art, not because it was unimportant, but because it won't fit into the grand narrative of the evolution of Classical Greek and Roman art. For successive generations of scholars Etruscan Art has been a "problem" they could not solve. In view of the powerful influence the Etruscans had in ancient Rome, this unsolved "problem" of Etruscan Art is a major issue in Western Art History. In this course we will take an in depth look at the enigmatic Etruscans and their art, and explore different solutions to the problems they pose.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W20  90126 Lec B1 TR 1230-0150 T 1 90 S. Hijmans


CLASS 399/RELIG 309 - Topics in the Ancient World- *3 (3-0-0)

Note: There is no background knowledge needed for this course and prerequisties will be waived with consent.

*Taught in conjuction with RELIG 309

Topic Title:Ancient Near Eastern and Israelite Religion and Mythology

Description: This course will explore some of the greatest stories and mythologies of the ancient Near East.  We will begin by looking at the earliest surviving great work of literature.  The Epic of Gilgamesh.  From there, we will explore other influential ancient tests, such as Enuma Elish, Atra-Hasis, and the Tale of Aqhat (all while we analyze several important questions: What is mythology? And why does humanity find stories and mythology so important?

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W20 97669 Lec B1 MWF 0300-0350 T 1 190  P. Sabo