History

HIST 602 RESEARCH METHODS & RESOURCES IN HISTORY *1 (0-1s-0)
Taught in conjunction with CLASS 501.

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F17 73294 SEM A1 T 12:30-13:20 T 2 39 Haagsma,Margriet


HIST 603 HISTORY OF HISTORICAL WRITING
 *3 (0-3s-0) 

B1 Canadian Historiography
This course will introduce students to the major themes, narratives, and debates current in Canadian historiography. Topics will cover all major time periods and fields in Canadian history. It will be directed by Professors Muir and Ens, but several of the Canadianists will teach in the course.

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W18 95671 SEM B1 M 1400 - 1650 T 1 83 Muir, James


HIST 604 THE APPLICATION OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES TO HISTORY
*3 (0-3s-0)

A1  This course is a graduate seminar to discuss theories and methods from the social sciences that influence how historians analyze historical change. Coverage includes work by Karl Marx, Max Weber, Karl Polanyi, Benedict Anderson, Clifford Geertz, Jürgen Habermas and Michel Foucault.

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F17 72812 SEM A1 W 1400 - 1650 T 2 64 Moure,Kenneth


HIST 614 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF LATER MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE
*3 (0-3s-0)

A1 The Reformation(s), 500 Years On: Secular? Ecclesiastical? Modern? Medieval?
Textbooks, whig historians, and culture-warriors would still like the "Protestant Reformation(s)" to have been the watershed between the putatively 'Catholic', ecclesiastical, authoritarian Middle Ages and a nascent 'Protestant', secular, liberal modernity. The last two decades of research on the Reformations and their consequences as well as the development of a corpus of scholarship re-examining and refuting key aspects of liberal and Weberian secularization theory (esp. since 9/11) suggest that the old Western Civ (Cold War) textbook story of the Reformation as the dawn of secular liberal modernity is not merely wrong, it is fundamentally misleading and has pernicious consequences for contemporary political culture. That whig story fosters and subtends such poisonous paradigms as Huntington's 'Clash of Civilizations' hypothesis, and ahistorical, deluded calls for a "Reformation" of Islam. We will examine both historical and contemporary issues, including: how secular societies redeploy Christian (or other) religious cultures in mutated form so as to be able to claim a break with a reviled past while simultaneously retaining key features of that past; how public and political claims in the developed world about what is progressive, modern, liberal, secular, etc., depend on Othering and Orientalizing both the European past and non-western cultures, effectively equating them with each other so as to fit them into a modernizing, capitalist 'Reformation trajectory'; how the first 'culture wars', the Kulturkampf of the 19th century, fundamentally shaped both academic history and western political culture (as well as the world of Harry Potter!) by portraying 'the Reformation' and 'Protestantism' as the engines of modernity (culminating in the work of Max Weber); and other related topics..

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F17 72814 SEM A1 W 1300 - 1550 T 2 44 Gow, Andrew


HIST 617 FASHION AND MATERIAL CULTURE: POLITICS, ECONOMIES, SOCIETIES, c. 1600 - 1900
*3 (0-3s-0)
This course explores the practice of fashion as a social, economic, political and cultural phenomenon from a cross-cultural perspective from the 1500s-1800s. We also assess material culture as a source of unique evidence in historical study. The two – fashion and material culture – are inextricably linked. Fashion signals societal change as well as cultural or political tensions; it reveals gendered norms and expectations, while also marking significant economic transformations. Material life and material culture are integral to assessments of fashion and will be a point of study in this course. Taught in conjunction with HIST 405 A1 and HECOL 464.

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F17 72338 SEM A1 T 1230 - 1520 T 2 44 Lemire, Beverly


HIST 630 PROBLEMS IN IMPERIAL RUSSIAN HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

A1 The Russian Revolution

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F17 74126 SEM A1 R 0930-1220 T 2 79 Coleman, Heather
 

HIST 631 PROBLEMS IN 20TH-CENTURY RUSSIAN HISTORY *3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Ukraine's Relations with Russia in the Independence Period, 1991-2016. Taught in conjunction with HIST 419 B1.

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W18 92690 SEM B1 F 0800 - 1050 T 2 44 Marples, David


HIST 633 PROBLEMS IN MODERN EAST EUROPEAN HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Everyday Life in Imperial and Soviet Russia.  Taught in conjunction with HIST 416
Would you like to learn about everyday life in Imperial and Soviet Russia, daily life in time of stability and catastrophe, reform and revolution, war and peace? We study urban and village life, food and drinks, housing and furniture, work and play, family and marriage in Imperial and Soviet Russia. We discover the world of country noble estates in Imperial Russia and Soviet communal apartment living. We use photos and films, visualizing Russian everyday life; memoirs and diaries to hear the voices of Russian people.

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W18 95776 SEM B1 M 0900 - 1150 T 1 83 Saburova,Tatiana
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HIST 660 TOPICS IN CANADIAN HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Histories of the Rocky Mountains 

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W18 93965 SEM B1 W 1400 - 1650 T 2 44 Piper, Elizabeth 


HIST 664 TOPICS IN WESTERN CANADIAN HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Fort Edmonton and the Fur Trade  Taught in conjunction with HIST 460
The North American Fur Trade had a major impact on the history of the continent. It contributed to European exploration, it led to extensive contacts between Europeans and Natives, and it linked indigenous hunters to the industrial capitals of Europe. White fur traders often functioned as the advance guard of imperialism: political, economic, social, and ecological. In the case of Canada the northern fur trade defined the territory of the future nation. This seminar will examine the fur trade in the context of Fort Edmonton, one of the major fur-trade entrepots in Western Canada. Against the background of the major historiographical trends in fur-trade studies, this course will meet once a week for three hours for reports and discussion of a specific topic and specific primary sources related to Fort Edmonton. Established by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1795, Fort Edmonton presents an excellent case study to explore the fur trade in a regional setting including themes such as: Native-Newcomer relations, Native diplomacy and warfare, environmental history, and social history.

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W18 93969 SEM B1 T 1230 - 1520 T 2 44 Ens, Gerhard  


HIST 665 HISTORY OF EDMONTON
 *3 (0-3s-0)

This seminar will explore the history of Edmonton, including the period prior to the incorporation of the city. Students will engage with the existing historical literature on Edmonton, with attention to themes such as the making of Treaty Six, the consolidation of capitalism, civic boosterism, and labour activism. Students will also read broadly in historical and theoretical literatures that will position them to undertake original research in archival sources at the City of Edmonton Archives, the Provincial Archives of Alberta, and/or other relevant repositories. This seminar will appeal not only to students with an interest in Edmonton or urban topics, but also to those interested in gaining hands-on experience with archival materials.

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F17 75377 SEM A1 M 1300 - 1550 T 2 79 Stunden Bower, Shannon


HIST 685 TRADITION AND MODERNITY IN CHINA
*3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Religion and the State in Modern China
This seminar course explores the relationship between religion and the Chinese state, with an emphasis on the period since 1979. As such, it touches on the nature of state power, law, pluralism, international relations, ethnicity, political legitimation and cultural reinvention in Chinese modernity.

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W18 92830 SEM B1 T 1400 - 1650 T 2 79 Dunch, Ryan


HIST 698 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE
*3 (0-3s-0)

B1 Ayurvedic Medicine

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W18 94106 SEM B1 W 1400 - 1650 T 2 79 Wujastyk, Dominik


HIST 699 RESEARCH SEMINAR
*3 (0-3S-0)

A3

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F17 73430 SEM A3 T 1230 - 1520 T 2 79 Hendrickson, Jocelyn

A4

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F17 74147 SEM A4 TR 1100 - 1220 T 2 64 Wujastyk, Dominik


B3

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W18 93976 SEM B3 M 1300 - 1550 T 2 39 McDougall, E Ann


B4 

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W18 93974 SEM B4 TR 1100 - 1220 T 2 64 Wujastyk, Dominik