Classics 200 Level

CLASS 221 LITERATURE OF GREECE AND ROME*3 (3-0-0)

An introductory survey in English translation of major works from Greek and Latin literature. This will include epic, historiography, and drama. May not be taken concurrently with or subsequent to CLASS 321/322. Formerly CLASS 201.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

F17 72184  LEC A1  TR 12:30-13:50  T 1 129  MacFarlane, Kelly 

CLASS 254 INTRO TO GREEK ART & ARCHAEOLOGY *3 (3-0-0)

Survey of the art, artifacts, and monuments of the Ancient Greek World. Formerly CLASS 252.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

F17 71362  LEC A1  TR 09:30-10:50  T 1 119 Haagsma, Margriet

CLASS 255 INTRO TO ROMAN ART & ARCHAEOLOGY *3 (3-0-0)

Survey of the art, artifacts, and monuments of the Ancient Roman World. Formerly CLASS 252.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W18 91106 LEC B1 MWF  13:00-13:50  T 1 119 Hijmans, Steven

CLASS 261 WOMEN IN THE ANCIENT WORLD *3 (3-0-0)

The role of women and the construction of gender and sexuality in Greek and Roman society from the Archaic period to Late Antiquity.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W18 92886  LEC B1  TR 12:30-13:50  ESB 2 35  Mackay, Katherine

CLASS 280 INTRO TO ANCIENT GREEK HISTORY *3 (3-0-0)

From Agamemnon to Alexander: Have you ever wondered if the Homeric king Agamemnon, leader of the Greek forces in the Trojan War, actually existed? Was Alexander the Great really great? Why did the Persian king Xerxes attack Greece? Who were the Spartans, and what was unique about them? How did the Athenians acquire such a large empire? Who was Pericles and what did he accomplish? Why was the Parthenon in Athens built? Why did the Athenians and the Spartans attack one another in the Peloponnesian War? Why did the Athenians execute the philosopher Socrates?
You will learn the answers to these and any other questions you have ever had about Ancient Greece in CLASS 280 (Introduction to Ancient Greek History), a historical survey of the civilization that shaped western culture. To the ancient Greeks we owe our concepts of history, philosophy, drama, and political science. We shall cover the history of the Greek world from its beginnings in the Bronze Age with the Trojan War, through the Persian Wars and the ensuing rivalry of Athens and Sparta, until the death of Alexander the Great. We shall examine Greek history primarily through the eyes of the first great historians, Herodotus and Thucydides, who shaped the writing of history in ancient Greece (in English translation). Not open to students with credit in any two of CLASS 371, 372, and 373 (prior to 2005-2006).

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

F17 71128  LEC A1  MWF  10:00-10:50  T B 87 Pownall, Frances A.

CLASS 283 INTRODUCTORY ROMAN HISTORY II *3 (3-0-0)

The Roman Empire to the late 5th century. Not open to students with credit in CLASS 281, 378 or 379.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W18 93931  LEC B1 MWF  12:00-12:50  T 1 107 Mackay, Christopher S

CLASS 291 INTRODUCTION SCIENTIFIC TERMINOLOGY *3 (3-0-0)

The vast majority of technical terms in the sciences (e.g., Biological Sciences, Geology, Medicine, Dentisty) derive from Greek and Latin and understanding such terms is often a daunting task for students who lack a background in Greek and Latin. In this course, students will learn the Greek and Latin elements from which scientific terms are created and so develop a broader scientific vocabulary and a greater understanding of origins, formation and meaning of technical vocabulary. As a spoonful of sugar to help the terminology go down, we will also examine the historical, cultural, artistic, and literary background to provide some context for the creation of the scientific terminology from Greek and Latin roots. In addition to making it easier to understand and become conversant with the drier aspects of the topic, this additional material is interesting in its own right and gives students further insight into the historical development of scientific thinking. No prior knowledge of Greek or Latin is required or assumed.

Term

Class

Section

Days

Time

Location

Instructor

W18 93200  LEC B1 MWF 13:00-13:50 T B 87 MacFarlane, Kelly Anne