History 400 Level

HIST 403 MEDIEVAL EUROPEAN HISTORY *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 Medieval Iberia: News, Christians and Muslims 

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F17 72244  SEM A1  T 12:30 - 15:20  T 2 44 Hendrickson, Jocelyn 

HIST 405 FASHION AND MATERIAL CULTURE C. 1600 - 1900  *3 (0-3s-0)

This course explores the practice of fashion as a social, economic, political and cultural phenomenon from a cross-cultural perspective from the 1500s-1800s. We also assess material culture as a source of unique evidence in historical study. The two – fashion and material culture – are inextricably linked. Fashion signals societal change as well as cultural or political tensions; it reveals gendered norms and expectations, while also marking significant economic transformations. Material life and material culture are integral to assessments of fashion and will be a point of study in this course. Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.Taught in conjunction with HIST 617 A1 and HECOL 464.

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F17 72336  SEM A1  T 12:30 - 15:20  T 2 44 Lemire, Beverly


HIST 416 TOPICS IN EASTERN EUROPEAN HISTORY  
*3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 Everyday life in Russia 
Would you like to learn about everyday life in Imperial and Soviet Russia, daily life in time of stability and catastrophe, reform and revolution, war and peace? We study urban and village life, food and drinks, housing and furniture, work and play, family and marriage in Imperial and Soviet Russia. We discover the world of country noble estates in Imperial Russia and Soviet communal apartment living. We use photos and films, visualizing Russian everyday life; memoirs and diaries to hear the voices of Russian people.

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F17 74129  SEM A1 W 10:00 - 12:50  T 2 39  Saburova, Tatiana  Syllabus Button

A2 The Russian Revolution

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F17 74124 SEM A2 R 09:30 - 12:20 T 2 79 Coleman, Heather

HIST 419 TOPICS IN SOVIET HISTORY *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

B1 Ukrainian's Relations with Russia in the Independence Period, 1991-2016

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W18 85785 SEM B1 F 08:00 - 10:50  T 2 44 Marples, David

HIST 420 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF EARLY MODERN EUROPE *3 (0-3s-0)

Thematic studies in European cultural, religious, and social history emphasizing popular culture and religion. Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 The Reformation(s), 500 Years On: Secular? Ecclesiastical? Modern? Medieval?
Textbooks, whig historians, and culture-warriors would still like the "Protestant Reformation(s)" to have been the watershed between the putatively 'Catholic', ecclesiastical, authoritarian Middle Ages and a nascent 'Protestant', secular, liberal modernity. The last two decades of research on the Reformations and their consequences as well as the development of a corpus of scholarship re-examining and refuting key aspects of liberal and Weberian secularization theory (esp. since 9/11) suggest that the old Western Civ (Cold War) textbook story of the Reformation as the dawn of secular liberal modernity is not merely wrong, it is fundamentally misleading and has pernicious consequences for contemporary political culture. That whig story fosters and subtends such poisonous paradigms as Huntington's 'Clash of Civilizations' hypothesis, and ahistorical, deluded calls for a "Reformation" of Islam. We will examine both historical and contemporary issues, including: how secular societies redeploy Christian (or other) religious cultures in mutated form so as to be able to claim a break with a reviled past while simultaneously retaining key features of that past; how public and political claims in the developed world about what is progressive, modern, liberal, secular, etc., depend on Othering and Orientalizing both the European past and non-western cultures, effectively equating them with each other so as to fit them into a modernizing, capitalist 'Reformation trajectory'; how the first 'culture wars', the Kulturkampf of the 19th century, fundamentally shaped both academic history and western political culture (as well as the world of Harry Potter!) by portraying 'the Reformation' and 'Protestantism' as the engines of modernity (culminating in the work of Max Weber); and other related topics.

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F17 72800  SEM A1  W 13:00 - 15:50  T 2 44 Gow, Andrew

HIST 421 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF EUROPE *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 Fascism in Europe, 1919-1945
This course will explore the history of radical-right and fascist political movements and regimes in Europe, primarily in Italy, Germany, Spain, France, and Britain, from 1919 to 1945, a period of global economic turbulence, heightened class conflict, political polarization, geopolitical rivalry, and total war.  It will focus on various aspects of fascism, broadly understood, as a European-wide political-ideological phenomenon:  its conditions of emergence as a movement of authoritarian populism and the dynamics by which it came to power in Italy and Germany; its paramilitary style of activism and commitment to political violence; its relationships to political conservatism, electoral politics, “civil society,” law and constitutional order, and “states of emergency;” and its distinctive methods of policing and deployments of state terror.  The course will also examine fascist spectacle, aesthetics, and cultural politics as they intersected with, or emerged from, the modalities of modern consumerism, popular entertainment, and media; fascist sexualities and gendered identities; fascist social “welfare” and population policies; and fascist racisms, antisemitism, imperialism, and genocide.   

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F17 74133  SEM A1  W 13:00 - 15:50  T 2 79 Sweeney, Dennis

HIST 428 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

X50 Celtic Christianity  

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W18 93960  SEM X50  M 18:00 - 21:00 T 2 79 Samson, Jane 


HIST 444 TOPICS IN TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 Swimming to Freedom: Understanding the Ongoing Refugee Crisis
This seminar traces the history of the ongoing refugee crisis and analyzes its impact on Europe, the Middle East, and North America. Assigned readings and weekly in-class discussions address various responses to the refugee crisis by the EU and individual Middle Eastern and European states as well as Canada and the United States of America. The readings also examine some of the challenges posed by a massive movement of population across state borders, and actions of non-state actors (NGO sector, professional associations, community organizations, international organizations) in responding to this developing crisis.

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F17 75895 SEM A1 R 12:30 - 15:20
T B 121
Pavlovic, Srdja


HIST 444 TOPICS IN TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

B1 Slavery in the Atlantic World

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W18 95291 SEM B1 R 09:30 - 12:30
Thompson, Guy


HIST 446 THEMES AND ISSUES IN AFRICAN HISTORY
 *3 (0-3s-0

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

B1 South Africa After Apartheid

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W18 93975  SEM B1  M 13:00 - 15:50 T 2 39 McDougall, E Ann

HIST 460 TOPICS IN CANADIAN HISTORY *3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

B1 Fort Edmonton and the Fur Trade
The North American Fur Trade had a major impact on the history of the continent. It contributed to European exploration, it led to extensive contacts between Europeans and Natives, and it linked indigenous hunters to the industrial capitals of Europe. White fur traders often functioned as the advance guard of imperialism: political, economic, social, and ecological. In the case of Canada the northern fur trade defined the territory of the future nation. This seminar will examine the fur trade in the context of Fort Edmonton, one of the major fur-trade entrepots in Western Canada. Against the background of the major historiographical trends in fur-trade studies, this course will meet once a week for three hours for reports and discussion of a specific topic and specific primary sources related to Fort Edmonton. Established by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1795, Fort Edmonton presents an excellent case study to explore the fur trade in a regional setting including themes such as: Native-Newcomer relations, Native diplomacy and warfare, environmental history, and social history.

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W18 93968  SEM B1 T 12:30 - 15:20  T 2 44 Ens, Gerhard

B2 Histories of the Rocky Mountains

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W18 93964  SEM B2 W 14:00-16:50  T 2 44 Piper,Elizabeth  

HIST 465 HISTORY OF EDMONTON  *3 (0-3s-0)

Themes in the history of Edmonton from the 19th century fur trade to the present day. Prerequisite: *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department..
This seminar will explore the history of Edmonton, including the period prior to the incorporation of the city. Students will engage with the existing historical literature on Edmonton, with attention to themes such as the making of Treaty Six, the consolidation of capitalism, civic boosterism, and labour activism. Students will also read broadly in historical and theoretical literatures that will position them to undertake original research in archival sources at the City of Edmonton Archives, the Provincial Archives of Alberta, and/or other relevant repositories. This seminar will appeal not only to students with an interest in Edmonton or urban topics, but also to those interested in gaining hands-on experience with archival materials.

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F17 75376  SEM A1 M 13:00 - 15:50 T 2 79 Stunden Bower, Shannon 


HIST 481 TOPICS IN CHINESE HISTORY
*3 (0-3s-0)

Prerequisite: A course in Asian history and *3 in HIST at the 300-level or consent of Department.

A1 Drama in Pre-modern China

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F17 75060  SEM A1  T 14:00 - 16:50  T B 65 Jay,Jennifer

B1 .Religion and the State in Modern China
This seminar course explores the relationship between religion and the Chinese state, with an emphasis on the period since 1979. As such, it touches on the nature of state power, law, pluralism, international relations, ethnicity, political legitimation and cultural reinvention in Chinese modernity. Students will be expected to master a substantial reading load, participate actively in weekly discussions, and complete a research paper. Prerequisite (enforced): *3 in Asian HIST or consent of Department.

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W18 92218  SEM B1 T 1400 - 1650 T 2 79 Dunch, Ryan

HIST 488 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE  *3 (0-3s-0)

B1 History of Ayurvedic Medicine

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W18  94105  SEM B1  W 14:00 - 16:50  T 2 79 Wujastyk, Dominik

B2 The U.S. and World War II

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W18 93972  SEM B2  R 11:00 - 13:50  T 2 39 Smith, Susan


HIST 496 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE
*3 (0-3s-0)

B1 The History of the Extraterrestrial Life Debate
This seminar will focus on the history of the questions of the existence, nature, and possible significance of extraterrestrial life from the Ancient World to today. We will examine the historical, scientific, religious, philosophical, and literary aspects of the debate. In so doing we will explore the writings of a range of authors including Aristotle, Lucretius, Aquinas, Giordano Bruno, Galileo, Kepler, Pascal, Newton, Voltaire, and Alfred Russel Wallace as well as various twentieth–century authors. We will also examine the emergence of intelligent aliens as standard elements in film (e.g. The War of the Worlds) and TV (e.g. Dr. Who) in the last seventy years.

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W18 93973  SEM B1  M 13:00 - 15:50  T 2 79 Smith, Robert