Featured Faculty Lecturer: Angela Bayduza

    Angela Bayduza has been bringing her extensive experience and contagious enthusiasm to her role as a full time Faculty Lecturer for the past six years, and shows no signs of slowing down

    By Nicole Graham on September 24, 2018

    For most people, having over 25 years of service at one organization takes them late into their career, even to a point where retirement may be on the horizon. But for Faculty Lecturer Angela Bayduza, she’s just hitting the mid-way mark. Recently appointed the Interim Associate Dean of Undergraduate, Angela began her first day at the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation (KSR) in September of 1992 as an undergraduate student in the Bachelor of Physical Education (now Bachelor of Kinesiology) degree program. An undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree later, Angela has been bringing her extensive experience and contagious enthusiasm to her role as a full time Faculty Lecturer for the past six years, and shows no signs of slowing down.

    Take us through your history with the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation
    As a very proud alumnus, I completed all three degrees in the Faculty. I convocated with a Bachelor of Physical Education, Physical Activity Leadership undergraduate degree in the spring of 1994. I immediately started my Master of Arts degree in the Faculty that fall, graduating two years later. Between 1995 and 2004, I held positions as a part-time sessional and full time contract lecturer at both the University of Alberta and at other post-secondary institutions before rounding out my student journey in the Faculty’s doctoral program. I completed my program on April 4—eight days before my 40th birthday—and convocated with a Doctor of Philosophy in April of 2012. I began my career as a fulltime Faculty Lecturer, on July 1, 2012.

    I was appointed the Interim Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs in July of this year. This is an exciting opportunity for me to grow as a professional. I also recently completed the Graduate Indigenous Sport and Recreation Certificate, offered by the Faculty, in June of 2018.

    What courses are you currently teaching?
    I am teaching KIN 294 in Fall 2018 and KRLS 371 in Winter 2019.

    What do you find most fulfilling about teaching?
    So many things! Seeing learning happen right in front of me and knowing that I had a part to play in that. The feeling that I get in being in the position to help, give back and pay forward some of what was given to me as a student. The energy that comes with a career where every day is different filled with such diverse people and experiences. Being able to share my own knowledge and engaging others in seeking and discovering knowledge; I still get butterflies every time I am about to teach. I simply love the art of teaching. It reminds me a lot of golf in that just when you think you are good, you pitch a clunker and realize there’s so much left to learn and come back to for more.

    How would you describe your teaching style?
    I try not to be a gatekeeper, but rather a facilitator of knowledge. I pride myself on being energetic, enthusiastic, organized, comprehensive and genuine. Students often describe my teaching style as passionate, understanding, accommodating, and supportive. I work hard in developing rapport with and engaging students in support of their learning, and often share pieces of my own life and experiences to connect with students. I also try to work with each student according to their own individual circumstance.

    How would you describe your teaching style?
    I try not to be a gatekeeper, but rather a facilitator of knowledge. I pride myself on being energetic, enthusiastic, organized, comprehensive and genuine. Students often describe my teaching style as passionate, understanding, accommodating, and supportive. I work hard in developing rapport with and engaging students in support of their learning, and often share pieces of my own life and experiences to connect with students. I also try to work with each student according to their own individual circumstance.

    What research interests are you or have you pursued/pursuing?
    In my PhD I focused primarily on the contextual influence of environment, particularly schools, on the physical activity and inactivity behaviours of children and youth. Currently, I am pursuing and am driven by a very wide variety of research interests that support my teaching, course work and content delivery, as well as the responsibilities of my new role as Interim Association Dean, Undergraduate. These interests include adult education strategies and effective pedagogical practices, blended learning strategies, First Nation, Inuit, Metis and Settler Ally relationship building, decolonization, mental health and wellness systems and supports at the post-secondary level, community engagement, cultural diversity and praxis, and qualitative movement analysis.

    What was the biggest hurdle to overcome transitioning from a Faculty student to a Faculty Lecturer?
    This really was a minimal adjustment for me because I had had various Sessional/Lecturer appointments while I was a student and had been here so long. For me, it was more about just missing being a student and the process of putting as much in my brain as I was giving out. As a Lecturer I found I was constantly focused on output and the sharing of knowledge. I really had to focus myself and make sure I continued to find ways to learn more, develop, evolve, and satisfy that need for input that is such a huge part of being a student. And after three degrees and 12 years of being a student, I got really used to and accustomed to that.

    You are currently the Interim Associate Dean of Undergraduate. What made you want to pursue this role and what do you hope to bring to/take from this opportunity?
    There are several things that all came together all at the same time that made it make sense for me to take on this new position and move onto this next step of my evolution as an academic. Working with Janice Causgrove Dunn (PhD supervisor) as I have over the last 15 years, I have always been interested and intrigued by her role in the Associate Dean, Undergraduate Program position. I have also been both a student of and taught within our undergraduate program, but never really had an opportunity to help in the shaping of this undergraduate program that I am so proud of and want to see continue to strive. I also deeply care about helping undergraduate students succeed and come to love this place as much as I do, moving forward in their lives as proud and successful KSR graduates.

    I hope to bring to this opportunity my passion for knowing and understanding, my collegial and social nature that is steeply imbedded with respect for and caring about others, my work ethic and simply wanting to get things done. I hope not to focus on changing, but rather to continue to build up, support, and advocate for, however I can, the amazing people who deliver our very successful undergraduate program on an everyday basis as well as those enrolled within it.

    Do you have anything to add?
    I have been part of this Faculty and the wider University of Alberta community for the past 26 years. Yes, we have world renowned programs and academic offerings here. Yes, we have seen many changes to both the physical and organizational structure of our spaces and places as well as to the delivery of our programs. There have been many facets and initiatives that have come and gone across these years. BUT the one thing that remains constant throughout all of this, is the incredibly giving, supportive, and exceptional people we have in KSR and at the U of A. From student right through to all of our staff. I consider myself so very blessed and honored not only to have had the privilege of attaining my education and training here but also to be able to work alongside others who I consider to be world renowned people in continuing to shape and develop a Faculty I am so proud to say I graduated from … three times!