CHESL Centre

Questionnaires

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The Alberta Language Development Questionnaire
The Alberta Language Environment Questionnaire


Two parental questionnaires were used in this research to obtain information about the children’s language development and language environment, in both their first and second language. Below are brief descriptions of the purpose and content of each questionnaire, with links to downloadable versions of the questionnaires. Note that these questionnaires are intended to be given as interviews to ensure parents understand the questions.

The Alberta Language Development Questionnaire (ALDeQ)

Download the ALDeQ, complete with instructions for scoring and norming (PDF).

  • The ALDeQ consists of questions for parents concerning the early and current development of an ESL child’s first language. The purpose is to understand whether there may be evidence of delay or difficulties in the first language.
  • The ALDeQ was designed primarily for situations where a clinician has limited abilities to examine a child’s first language directly.
  • The ALDeQ is not specific to a particular first language. It was developed in consultation with the Multicultural Health Brokers Cooperative in Edmonton.
  • The ALDeQ consists of sections on the following topics:
    • Early milestones
    • Current first language abilities
    • Behaviour patterns and activity preferences
    • Family history
  • The ALDeQ includes rating scale responses that yield a proportion score between 0 and 1, where higher scores are more consistent with typical development.
  • Administering the ALDeQ takes approximately 30 minutes.  It is given as an interview.

For more information on the development of the ALDeQ and how it functions to discriminate between ESL children with typical language from those with language impairment, see:

Paradis, J., Emmerzael, K., & Sorenson Duncan, T. (2010). Assessment of English Language Learners: Using Parent Report on First Language Development (PDF). Journal of Communication Disorders, Volume 43, pp. 474-497.

The Alberta Language Environment Questionnaire (ALEQ)

Download the ALEQ, complete with instructions for scoring (PDF).

  • The ALEQ consists of questions about family demographics, language use among family members in the home, and other aspects of an ESL child’s language environment.
  • The purpose of the ALEQ is to provide background information on an ESL child that could be relevant for researchers as well as educators and clinicians.
  • The ALEQ should be given as an interview.
  • The most important information from the ALEQ for the chesl website is the information on a child’s length of exposure to English. This information is necessary for interpreting the analyses and norms from the language measures.
  • The ALEQ is not specific to a particular first language. It was developed in consultation with the Multicultural Health Brokers Cooperative in Edmonton.
  • See Calculating Exposure to English for a simplified method of determining age of exposure without the ALEQ.

The ALEQ consists of questions that are designed to obtain the following information:

  • when the parents and target child arrived in Canada
  • when the target child started to learn English in a preschool or primary school program
  • parents' self-rated fluency in English
  • parents' education levels
  • parents' use of English and their mother tongue at home and at work
  • target child and siblings' use of English and their mother tongue at home
  • target child's activities and media experiences in English, both inside and outside the home

The ALEQ has many rating scale responses and a scoring scheme which yields summary information on:

  • language use among family members in the home
  • the richness of the target child's English and mother tongue environments
For research that includes information obtained with the ALEQ, see:
Paradis, J. (2011). Individual Differences in Child English Second Language Acquisition: Comparing Child-Internal and Child-External Factors. Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, Volume 1(3).

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