Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Symposium Research Projects

Indigenous health in undergraduate medical curricula: a student-led group-based learning curriculum innovation

Understanding the genetic, environmental, and social risk factors contributing to illness within Indigenous populations is essential for equitable provision of health care. First Nations groups suffer a higher prevalence of diabetes than the non-Indigenous population in Canada. Medical trainees should recognize disparities due to intergenerational trauma and socioeconomic stressors. To promote cultural competence, an integrative group learning session on diabetes in the Indigenous population was incorporated in the undergraduate pre-clinical curriculum.

  • Finola Hackett, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Sarah Burton McLeod, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Tracey Hillier, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Helly Goez, University of Alberta
  • Finola Hackett, University of Alberta

 


Innovative Organ Donation Curricula Undergraduate Medical Education

Organ transplantation is limited by the availability of donors. Improving physician knowledge and attitudes towards organ donation has potential to positively influence the decision of potential donors’ families. Currently, organ donation teaching at the University of Alberta medical school is sparse, with only one hour addressing the organ procurement process and no teaching in the social, cultural and global health aspects of the topic.

  • Calvin Tseng, University of Alberta
  • Teresa Li, University of Alberta
  • Jessica Luc, University of Alberta
  • Hollis Lai, University of Alberta
  • Helly Goez, University of Alberta

 


A student led curriculum innovation to implement human trafficking awareness into undergraduate medical education

Health Care Providers are in a special position to help victims of human trafficking seeking urgent medical care. When provided with the necessary tools, health care professionals are able to recognize victims and take the necessary steps in providing care that might be beyond the immediate medical need. Increasing awareness amongst medical students will improve practice and ensure health equity and patient safety. A module on human trafficking was implemented into the undergraduate medical curricula.

  • Julianna Deutscher, University of Alberta
  • Derek Fehr, University of Alberta
  • Jeremy Christensen, University of Alberta
  • Finola Hackett, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Helly Goez, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Tracey Hillier, University of Alberta
  • Dr. Hollis Lai, University of Alberta
  • Stephen Miazga, University of Alberta

Integrating LGBT competency training into undergraduate medical curricula

There is a need to integrate LGBT competency training throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The AAMC, CFMS, and CMA have all called for improving sex/gender diversity training in medical school curricula. The health disparities and unique needs of this population requires targeted training and exposure. The purpose of this project was to develop a method to enhance LGBT content coverage within the curriculum.

  • Derek Fehr, University of Alberta
  • Hollis Lai, University of Alberta
  • Julianna Deutscher, University of Alberta

Exploring Barriers in Accessing Care and Analyzing the Pre and Post Migration Health Status of Refugee Youth in Canada

Refugees represent a fragile minority population experiencing the challenges of forced migration while escaping the instability and violence that often exist in
their country of origin. It is crucial that our Canadian healthcare system appropriately serves this population and addresses their needs.
Two major goals of our literature review were:
 
a) to explore the health status of refugee youth in Canada both pre and post migration.
b) to understand the ways adolescent refugees access healthcare.
  • Kruhlak*, I
  • Gargoum*A. 
  • Goez, H. 
  • Hillier, T. 
  • Caine, V. 
  • Abdulmalik, A.
  • Rashid, M.