Faculty Members

Georg Schmolzer

Associate Professor

Department of Pediatrics

Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Care (NICU)
    Contact details are for academic matters only.

About Me

Welcome to CSAR, the Centre for the Studies of Asphyxia and Resuscitation, a world-leading program that is unique in Canada.  

CSAR’s research focus is to 1) understand basic respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and metabolic changes during fetal to neonatal transition and 2) improve diagnoses, mitigate risk and improve survival and quality of life for newborns. CSAR is a leading training and innovation centre in neonatal asphyxia and resuscitation research, and a leader in research translation to policy. CSAR is developing new research directions, influences guideline development and policy statements for national and international health communities.​ 

CSAR integrates an excellent research team with a focus on asphyxia and resuscitation, and on follow-up for outcomes (e.g. chronic lung disease and neurodevelopmental delays). CSAR studies asphyxia and resuscitation ranging from basic to clinical research. In the delivery rooms CSAR uses a unique recording system, which continuously measures respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and metabolic changes during fetal to neonatal transition.​

In 2014 Dr. Georg Schmölzer (Director of CSAR) received the inaugural Heart and Stroke Foundation Professorship in Neonatal Resuscitation to improve the care for newborn infants in Canada.


Teaching

1) RETAIN: A Board Game That Improves Neonatal Resuscitation Knowledge Retention. Maria Cutumisu, Siddhi D. Patel, Matthew R. G. Brown, Caroline Fray, Patrick von Hauff, Thomas Jeffery and Georg M. Schmölzer. Front. Pediatr., 31 January 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2019.00013

2) The RETAIN educational platform (https://www.playretain.com)



Research

Globally, 15 million newborns are born prematurely and 20% of them require support at birth; annually, ~1 million of these will die due to birth asphyxia. A significant proportion of these critically ill newborns survive with chronic lung disease or neurodevelopmental disabilities. This puts a heavy burden on health resources, as these infants require frequent hospital re-admission. Refining resuscitation techniques to decrease long-term complications has potential to improve quality of life for newborns and their families.​

CSAR's focus is to 1) understand basic respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological changes during the fetal to neonatal transition and 2) improve diagnoses, mitigate risk and improve survival and quality of life for newborns. Improving neonatal outcomes requires specialized, interdisciplinary centres such as CSAR, which combine basic, clinical and translational research.

Current Reserach Focus include:

1) RETAIN to teach neonatal Resuscitation

2) Pulseless electrical activity in newborns

3) Neonatal Chest Compression combining high airway pressures and chest compression

4) Pediatric Chest Compression combining high airway pressures and chest compression

5) Clinical trials

CSAR - Research


Research Keywords

Asphyxia, Chest Compression, Chronic Lung Disease, Cognitive Task Analysis, Delivery Room, Eye-tracking, Human Factors; Patient Safety, Infants, Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy, Neonatal Resuscitation, Newborns, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Resuscitation, Serious Games, Surfactant

Team Members

CSAR integrates an excellent research team with a wide range of interests including Basic Science, Simulation Research, Global Health, Delivery Room Research, and Translational Research (CSAR - Staff).

CSAR is proud to train the next generation of researchers. CSAR is a training centre for students from around the world. Recent students have been visiting CSAR from Canada, Japan, India, Norway, Germany, Italy, Ireland, and Austria (CSAR - Students)