100 YEARS OF INSULIN

This month, the University of Alberta celebrates 100 years since Canadian scientists, including U of A biochemist James Collip, discovered and purified insulin, making it possible to live with diabetes. Since then, research breakthroughs at the U of A have continued to make life better for people living with diabetes and their families. Today, with support from partner organizations and donors such as the Allard Foundation, DRIFCan and the Alberta Diabetes Foundation, we are closer than ever to a cure.

Read more about diabetes research.


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Program uses novel approach to improve diabetes care in First Nations communities

U of A researchers collaborate with First Nations and a non-profit to improve the health of people living with diabetes.

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Islet transplant patient #252: ‘A second chance at a better life’

Procedure developed at U of A guides islet cell transplants for people with Type 1 diabetes around the world.

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I have diabetes. Here’s why I’m glad I live in Alberta

Eating right, exercising, finding the right care. Navigating life with diabetes is hard. Having access to the Alberta Diabetes Institute makes it a little easier.

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The End of Insulin: Research Is Bringing Us Closer to a Cure Than Ever Before

A hundred years ago, diabetes became treatable. Today, five researchers are working to make insulin treatments obsolete.

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James Collip
James Collip and the Discovery of Insulin

In 1921, tiny Teddy weighed just 26 pounds. He was dying of diabetes. That was the year U of A researcher James Collip made his mark.

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History of a diabetes breakthrough

Twenty years ago, U of A scientists transformed Edmonton into the world's leading light in the quest to cure Type 1 diabetes. Now they're at it again.

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U of A-led research maps gene functions in pancreas cells that lead to diabetes

Diabetes researcher Patrick MacDonald heads leading repository of human islet tissue, supporting research in labs around the world.

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‘This is where the horizon is’: Diabetes research closer than ever to a possible cure

U of A researchers are reprogramming blood cells into insulin-producing cells to overcome the challenges of islet transplantation and possibly find a cure for Type 1 diabetes.

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Portraits of Diabetes

Portraits of Diabetes is an award-winning portrait series offering a glimpse into what it's like to live with diabetes-the highs and the lows.

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Research targets faster, safer source of islet cells for people with Type 1 diabetes

U of A researchers are harnessing AI to analyze patients’ own cells to create islet cells for transplant.

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