Modern Languages and Cultural Studies

Our Courses

Fall 2017 Courses

  • MLCS 622 Applied Linguistics: Research Methods (Dr. Jennifer Dailey-O'Cain)

TBA

  • MLCS 630 The Disciplines of Literature (Dr. Lynn Penrod)

The resurgence of world literature is widely considered the most significant development in contemporary literary studies. Much of the focus of the discussion has been on the expansion of the canon, or its “deprovincialization,” to finally make it truly global. However, the querying of world literature must also take on the nature of national literatures, indeed of literature itself. This is particularly true considering that, because of migration the broader dissemination of texts, and other globalizing forces, national literatures are becoming increasingly international in character. In this course we will examine the dynamic interplay between world literature and national literatures. In the process, we will explore such issues as translation, intermedia adaptation, and the circulation of texts, as well as the relationship between so called peripheries and centres within a given tradition between different literary systems. All the readings for this course are in English, although students are encouraged to analyze text in the language (or languages) of their choice. At the end of the course, successful students will be able to make an informed contribution to the scholarship on the nature and function of literature regionally, nationally, and internationally.

  • MLCS 640 Media and Cultural Studies Methodologies (Dr. Andreas Stuhlmann)

In finding and designing a MA or a PhD project, methods are often the “elephant in the room,” the topic we are reluctant to discuss. Methods are not only fundamental to the design of every academic project, they are crucial for its success. Often, an innovative method or the combination of different methods, sets an exceptional thesis, article or book apart from the pack. In this seminar we will focus on identifying and selecting those methods from the plethora of methods within cultural and media studies that are relevant for the projects of the participants. We will start by bringing clarity of the confusing usage of terms like “method”, “methodology”, and “approach” and uncover epistemological presuppositions, before we embark on an overview of selected methods from text-based hermeneutics and semiotics to methods of folklore and ethnographic research, to discourse analysis, and deconstruction. Special emphasis will be given to the interplay and integration of different theories and methods within individual approaches. Students will build their own archive of materials, case studies and theoretical texts relevant to their own research projects, present on case studies in class, and develop a corpus of methods.

  • MLCS 650 Teaching Strategies for Postsecondary Language Instructors (Dr. Xavier Gutiérrez)

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of issues in post-secondary teaching and learning. Based on theoretical and methodological underpinnings of instruction in higher education, we will apply these concepts in the design and completion of a variety of projects. We will develop teaching practices based on current pedagogical approaches and theories for courses on literature, film, media, etc., as well as foreign languages.

  • MLCS 651 Critical Theory I (Dr. Daniel Laforest)

An in-depth and comprehensive approach to the most crucial literary and cultural philosophies/theories from classical times to the Frankfurt School. Emphasis will be put on the imbrication of thinkers and texts with key moments in history. Bridges with contemporary questions and problems will be regularly suggested and explored. An international, transcultural perspective will be favoured. Students will read primary texts. 

  • MLCS 797 Academic Writing (Dr. Anne Malena)

This seminar will be run like a workshop involving both instructor and students. The class will be considered a Writing Group and you will work with alternating partners in order to familiarize yourself with as many writing styles as possible, while being encouraged to find your eventual “forever” Writing Partner. Initially you will be expected to choose a paper (term assignment, conference presentation or just some idea that you want to develop) on which you will work during the term. There is no need to arrive with this selection the first day since your first week’s tasks will help you in making a choice. Class time will be devoted to instruction, discussions about the weekly assignments and other readings and semi-formal marked presentations. Learning outcomes: You will acquire the necessary skills and confidence to write publishing quality papers as well as valuable editing skills for your own work and that of others. You will also become very familiar with various writing guides (MLA; APA; Chicago; Harvard).

  • MLCS 798 Comprehensives Colloquium (Dr. Vicky Ruétalo)

TBA

Winter 2018 Courses

  • MLCS 602 History of Translation (Dr. Waclaw Osadnik)

TBA

  • MLCS 620 Applied Linguistics: Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism (Dr. Alla Nedashkivska)

TBA

  • MLCS 621 Applied Linguistics: Language and Society (Dr. Elisabeth Le)

TBA

  • MLCS 652 Critical Theory II (Dr. Victoria Ruétalo)

A varied, international and transcultural approach to the thinkers and texts in cultural studies and critical theory of the second half of the 20th Century to the present. The course will favor an open-ended approach to the canon and will showcase the new directions and contemporary questions that define the field today. Students will read primary texts. 

  • MLCS 799 Candidacy Colloquium (Dr. Victoria Ruétalo)

TBA

General Course Offerings

  • MLCS 620 Applied Linguistics: Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism
    *3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Major theories and issues in past and present second language acquisition research. Course is cross-listed as LING 620. Credit will only be granted for MLCS 620 or LING 620.  Prerequisite: LING 101 or equivalent and consent of Department. 

  • MLCS 621 Applied Linguistics: Language and Society
    *3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The systematic study of language and society, including a theoretical foundation in sociolinguistics and discourse studies. Prerequisite: LING 101 or equivalent and consent of Department.

  • MLCS 622 Applied Linguistics: Research Methods
    *3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods in applied linguistics research. Prerequisite: LING 101 or equivalent and consent of Department.

  • MLCS 651 Critical Theory I
    *3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Literary and cultural theory from classical times to the twentieth century from around the world. Students will read primary texts. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 652 Critical Theory II
    *3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0) Literary and cultural theory in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries from around the world. Students will read primary texts. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 630 The Disciplines of Literature
    *3 (either term, 0-3s-0) The history of the study of literature, focusing on the relation between “national” and world literature, and the links to other media and disciplines. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 640 Media and Cultural Studies Methodologies
    *3 (either term, 0-3s-0) Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 696 Topics in Media and Cultural Studies
    *3 (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 795 Portfolio I
    *3 (either term, unassigned) Three individualized modules tailored to each student’s professional goals and developed by the student in conjunction with the department. This is a pass/ fail course, which is required of all students. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 796 Portfolio II
    *3 (either term, unassigned) Three individualized modules tailored to each student’s professional goals and developed by the student in conjunction with the department. This is a pass/ fail course which is required of all course-based MA students.Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 797 Academic and Professional Writing
    *3 (either term, 0-3L-0) Preparation and instruction in academic writing. This is a pass/ fail course. Prerequisite: consent of Department. 

  • MLCS 798 Comprehensives Colloquium
    *3 (either term, unassigned) Preparation for the comprehensive exams. This is a pass/ fail course. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

  • MLCS 799 Candidacy Colloquium
    *3 (either term, unassigned) Preparation for the candidacy exam. This is a pass/ fail course. Prerequisite: consent of Department.