Modern Languages and Cultural Studies

Recent Grads

Olena Sivachenko
PhD, Slavic Linguistics

 

Requesting in Ukrainian: Native Speakers' Pragmatic Behaviour and Acquisition by Language Learners  

Haiyan Xie
PhD Comparative Literature

Haiyan Xie

Mythorealism as Method: Ideology and Form in Yan Lianke's Fiction
My academic interest lies in both modern and contemporary Chinese literature and translation studies. My dissertation engages with novels by the contemporary Chinese writer Yan Lianke, to explore his formal experiment that he calls mythorealism and investigate how mythorealist form produces textual meanings that subvert the totalizing reality prescribed by literary realism and that reshape a diversity of realities. It identifies three different modes of mythorealist narratives
exemplified in Yan’s three novels: Dream of Ding Village (Dingzhuang meng), The Four Books (Sishu), and The Odes of Songs (Feng ya song). Each of these three narrative modes emphasizes a different aspect of mythorealism, all bringing the marginal under closer scrutiny by weaving their voices into the literary depiction of sociopolitical problems. Culminating in different kinds of absurdities, these narratives create a contradictory and paradoxical world in which a dichotomous worldview is completely subverted.

Safaneh Mohaghegh Neyshabouri
PhD, Comparative Literature

 

Resistance and Encroachment in Everyday Life: A Feminist Epistemological Study of Qajar Era Iranian Women’s Travel Journals
 

Diana Ivanycheva
PhD, Slavic Languages & Literatures

 

Painting in Time: Time and Art in Andrey Tarkovsky's Art Cinema  
Daria Polianska
PhD, Slavic Languages & Literatures 

Representation of Psychic Trauma in Ukrainian Modernist Prose

 

 

Jay Friesen
PhD Comparative Literature

Jay Friesen

Little Mosque, Big Ambitions: Intersections Between Comedy and Multiculturalism in Little Mosque on the Prairie

 

Can the relatively simple pleasure of sharing a laugh contribute to the more complicated process of creating a more equitable, multicultural society? In 2007, the Canadian TV series Little Mosque on the Prairie (2007-12) hit the airwaves, and it tried to accomplish precisely that. Heralded as the first “Muslim sitcom,” the show received an unusual amount of attention for TV comedy, both for portraying an underrepresented minority as well as attempting to offer compelling social commentary through the light-hearted sitcom genre. This project considers three main ideas. Firstly, it explores reasons why the series originated in Canada, rather than a country with a more established track record of producing TV hits. Secondly, it considers the impact of using traditional sitcom television conventions to deliver progressive social commentary, something not typically seen in the genre. Lastly, the research reflects on how our cultural understandings of humour frame the way social commentary is both delivered and received. The project concludes that while a useful tool, using comedy to promote progressive social change is not without its challenges, despite its ability to playfully engage audiences.

 

Mimi Okabe
PhD Comparative Literature

Mimi Okabe

Manga, Murder and Mystery: Investigating the Revival of the Boy Detective in Japan’s Lost Decade

My thesis takes up the genre of Japanese mystery/detective manga and explores the construction of the boy detective (shōnen tantei) to address the crisis of young adult culture during the so-called Lost Decade in Japan. It conducts a comparative textual analysis of three commercially successful manga: Kanari Yōzaburō and Seimaru Amagi’s Kindaichi Shōnen no Jikenbo (1992-1997), Aoyama Gōshō’s Meitantei Konan (1994- ), and Ohba Tsugumi’s Death Note (2003-06), and reveals that the boy detective is defined by his role as the other, but that each series deals with this otherness in thematically different ways in response to the discursive formation of youth delinquents in 1990s Japan. For up-to-date info about my research and teaching, please check out my website: mimiokabe.com

 

Jérémie Pelletier-Gagnon
PhD Comparative Literature / Digital Humanities

Jeremie Pelletier-Gagnon

 

Playing in Public: Situated Play at the Intersection of Software, Cabinet and Space in Japanese Game Centres

 

Jérémie's area of specialization lie at the intersection of Game Studies, Digital Humanities, and East Asian Studies. Playing in Public, defended in 2019, consists of an examination of Japanese game centres (arcades) through the perspective of the social affordances provided by the assemblage of game cabinets, game software and the space of game centres. He published in academic journals such as Space and Culture (2018) and The Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds (2018). His upcoming research project explores the potential of the use of big data tools and methodologies for quantitative analysis in the context of research on video games and their related practices in the humanities.

 

Sofia Sanchez
MA Applied Linguistics

 

The Use of Discourse Markers in Argumentative Compositions by Learners of Spanish as a Foreign Language

 

 

 

 

Jesus Toapanta
PhD Spanish & Latin American Studies

Jesus Toapanta

 

Metacognitive Instruction in L2 Listening: an intervention study

My academic and professional interests lie in the areas of linguistics and applied linguistics. I am particularly interested in the development of L2 listening skills. My dissertation, an intervention study, compared different types of L2 listening instruction. The results of this intervention study showed that teaching learners how to listening is feasible and can be achieved when instruction is student-centered and when clusters of cognitive and metacognitive strategies are taught together. In the area of language pedagogy, these results are very important since instruction in L2 listening has mostly focused on checking comprehension and not necessarily on developing L2 listening skills.

 

Héloïse Torck
MA (course) Applied Linguistics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ashley Halko-Addley
MA (course) Media & Cultural Studies

Ashley Halko-Addley

 

Through ethnographic fieldwork, my research project "Waxing Away Illness" aimed to collect information about the Ukrainian wax ceremony as it is being practiced in Western Canada, and preserve this information for future generations. This study was successful in increasing awareness and discourse around this under-researched topic in Ukrainian-Canadian culture and history.

Sylvia Madueke
PhD French Languages, Literatures & Linguistics

Translating and Publishing Nigerian Literature in France (1953-2017): A Study of Selected Writers
 
Mansoureh Modarres
PhD Comparative Literature
Reimagining Herstory: A Transnational Study of Women’s Writings

 
Shanna Mumm
PhD French Languages, Literatures & Linguistics

Léopold Sédar Senghar's Revolution of 1889 and Littérature-monde: Awakening Intuition  
Rupert Thorough
PhD Comparative Literature

Reinterpreting the Literary Fairytale of Wilhelm Hauff: An Emendation of His Life and Works


 

Lina Shaw
PhD Slavic Languages and Literatures

Lina Shaw

The Phenomenon of Orthodox Bestsellers in Contemporary Russia

My research is aimed at providing a better insight into the contemporary intellectual and cultural climate in Russia. Analysis of contemporary Orthodox bestsellers was conducted in an effort to discuss their literary and cultural values and to explain their widespread appeal, focusing on the historical, social and political concerns that inform the Orthodox book market. The study of major Orthodox publishing phenomena adds a new perspective and facilitates a fuller vision of contemporary Russian mainstream literature. In the way how the authors negotiate meaning of the faith and how they present its belief practices, and in acceptance of some discourses and intolerance of others, we can gain insight into the nature of current Russian religious boom and where the Russian people see themselves in the process.

Kara Abdolmaleki
PhD Comparative Literature

Kara Abdolmaleki

A Robin Redbreast in an Iron Cage: Revisiting the Intellectual Movement of Dissent in Iran between the 1953 Coup and the 1979 Revolution

My dissertation theorizes the anticolonial movement of "A Return to Self" in Iran and draws parallels between that discourse and the Frankfurt School. It then engages in close reading of works of fiction, poetry, and film to trace the manifestations of the discourse of A Return and its critique of instrumental rationality and other aspects of Enlightenment thought. The dissertation concludes that the discourse of a return is not retrograde and nativist but a progressive, unfinished project, the legacy of which is critique of neoliberalism in Iran and elsewhere.
Spencer Nelson
MA (course) Transnational & Comparative Literatures

   

Amelia Hall
MA Spanish & Latin American Studies

 

If These Walls Could Talk: Urban Cultural Patrimony and Spatialized Social Exclusion in the Colonial Centro Histórico of Campeche
 
Brendan Cavanagh
MA (course) Transnational & Comparative Literatures

   

Stephen Cruikshank
PhD Spanish & Latin American Studies

Stephen Cruikshank

The Mulata Affect: Bioremediation in the Cuban Arts My research is two-pronged. Firstly, my PhD dissertation (2018) analyzes the visual mediations of the mulata—that is the woman of mixed African and European heritage—through a century of arts in Cuba. The project investigates and connects images of nationalist art in the 1930s, popular graphic art and design in the 1940s, revolutionary photography in the 1960s, and the "Special Period" (post-soviet) film in the early 2000s. My research uses feminist inspired affect theory to theorize how the racial and gender stereotypes of the mulata body have been "bio-remediated" over time. Otherwise said, I look into the affective responses passed to and from the mulata body in different arts and how these images consequently reflect the political, ideological, and socio-cultural shifts during the time of their production. The second stage of my research questions how the designations Latin American cultures have been affected by tropic figures (both masculine and feminine) that are tied to previous nineteenth and twentieth century nationalist projects? Currently ongoing, the key objective of this project is to investigate how racial and gender stereotypes embodied by these national tropes have been mediated over time through artistic expressions, consequently affecting the way cultural identities are being perceived, produced, and performed today.

Pengfei Wang
PhD Comparative Literature

Metaphysical and Mid Late Tang Poetry: A Baroque Comparison  

Axel Perez Trujillo
PhD Spanish & Latin American Studies

Axel Perez Trujillo

 

The Wide and Silent Land: Environmental Imaginaries of the Plains in Latin American Literature

Axel's research focuses on the environmental imaginaries of plains biomes in Latin American literature, drawing from ecocriticism and digital humanities. His dissertation emphasizes the role of the plains beyond national boundaries, as well as reveals the dominant images of these biodiverse regions in canonical literary texts.

Svitlana Panenko
PhD Slavic Languages, Literatures & Linguistics

Svitlana Panenko

Towards Critical Realism: Marginality in Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian Photography

 

Svitlana's research focuses on independent photographic practices during the 1980s and 1990s in three Eastern European countries: Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. She studies photography using the notions of critical realism, margin, and everyday life. Taken together, these three themes form the context that both accurately describes the studied photography and offers a new perspective of research within Eastern European art. Keywords: photography, film, nonconformism, contemporary art, photographic truth, critical realism, margin and center, everyday life.

Nadya Foty-Oneschuk
PhD Ukrainian Folklore

"Saving Heritage": Stakeholders, Successes, and Project SUCH  
Alexandra Guyot
MA Translation Studies

Translating Mircea Eliade's "Ivan" from Romanian to English: A Triangular Approach Using The French Translation


 

Guangfeng Chen
PhD French Language, Literature & Linguistics

Guangfeng Chen

China’s National Image Puzzle: The Construction of China’s Environmental Image in Le Monde

This thesis conducts a CDA study of French news on environmental issues related to China to reflect a "western" view of China, and explores the ideological workings and issues of power behind this media representation. Guangfeng’s research interests include critical discourse analysis, environmental discourses (French, English and Chinese), media studies and intercultural communication.

Olha Ivanova
MA (course) Media & Cultural Studies 

 

 

 
Sarah Brandvold
MA Comparative Literature 

Uinigumasuittuq: The Pan-Arctic Sea Woman Tradition as a Source of Law and Literary Theory

 

 

Elahe Dehnavi
PhD Comparative Literature

Elli Dehnavi

 

Veiled Voices: Female Subjectivity and Gender Relations in Afghan and Iranian Cinemas

 

 
Leanne Rempel
MA Spanish and Latin American Studies
The Blurred Line: Narrative and Truth in Three Colombian Crónicas

 

Milane Pridmore-Franz
MA Translation Studies

Milane Pridmore-Franz

A Study on the Audience Reception of Theatre Surtitles: Surtitling in a Francophone Minority Context in Canada and the Language Learning Potentials of Theatre Surtitles

The main objectives of this multifaceted research was to 1.) measure the perceptions of and reactions to English surtitles in a Francophone minority theatre context according to the participants’ first language (French L1, French and English L1, English L1, Other L1) in order to gain an understanding of how mono- and bilingual audiences make use of theatre surtitles, and how surtitles affect their reception of a theatre production; 2.) to assess the language-learning potentials of surtitles and; 3.) to measure the effect of the technical aspects of surtitles on the reception process. Keywords: theatre surtitles; audience reception; technical aspects; second-language acquisition; audiovisual translation; translation studies; francophone minority theatre contexts in Canada

Jessica Holtby
MA Translation Studies 

Self-Translation Songs: How à l'aise are you?  
Jennifer Boivin
PhD
Animation and the National Ethos: the American Dream, Socialist Realism and Russian émigrés in France

 
Loriann Lockhart
MA German Language, Literature & Linguistics

Beyond the Book on the Shelf: The Value of Translation Theory  
Maja Staka
MA French Language, Literature & Linguistics
Uncovering the Links Between News Media Portrayals of Syrian Refugees in Canada and Their Integration into Canadian Society

 

Amir Khadem
PhD Comparative Literature

Amir Khadem

Endemic Pains and Pandemic Traumas: The Narrative Construction of Public Memory in Iran, Palestine, and the United States

 
Jeffrey Longard
PhD Translation Studies

A Troubled Translation: Reading the Lais of Marie de France  

Rasoul Aliakbari
PhD Comparative Literature

 

Bibliographies of A Thousand and One Nights and the Formation of Modern Nationhood: A Study in Comparative Print Culture

Rasoul's research areas include print culture, book history, world literature, writing studies, digital humanities, literary modernity, nationalism, and Middle Eastern studies.

Ana Magalhaes
MA Comparative Literature
Olhar-se e Tocar-se, Olhar e Tocar, Ser Olhado e Ser Tocado: Subversão das Categorias Binárias em A Mulher no Espelho, de Helena Parente Cunha e Las Ninfas a Veces Sonríen, de Ana Clavel

 
Sumaya Al Jamily
MA Comparative Literature 

Practical Criticism: The Intertextuality between Ahmad Shawqi and Alphonse de Lamartine

 

Danielle Lamb
PhD Comparative Literature

Danielle Lamb

A Critical Bond: Cultural Transmission and Nation-Building in Métis and Chicana/o Picture Books Research:
Picture books, Children's Literature, Grand(parenting), Transculturation, Chicana/o Literature, Métis Literature


Regan Treewater
PhD Comparative Literature

Regan Treewater

Cultural Identity Construction in Russian-Jewish Post-Immigration Literature Regan's scholarly research interests are rooted in Eastern European Jewish literary and cultural studies beginning with early Yiddishkeit in the Pale of Settlement through contemporary post-Communist diasporas.  Her doctoral dissertation bridges East and West with an examination of complex identity construction in the literature of the Russian-Jewish post-1970s emigration waves.  The analysis includes the works of Dina Rubina, Liudmila Ulitskaia, Wladimir Kaminer, Gary Shteyngart, Irina Reyn, Lara Vapnyar and David Bezmozgis.  Regan plans to adapt her dissertation for publication as a monograph.

Jiaying You
PhD Interdisciplinary-MLCS & Anthropology

 

Creative Factors and Ethnic-folk Dance: A Case Study of the Peacock Dance in China (1949-2013)   

Angela Sacher
PhD Translation Studies

 

Translating Johanna Kinkel's "Hans Ibeles in London"   

Sergiy Yakovenko
PhD Comparative Literature

Ecological Ideologies of Modernity and Their Temporal-Spatial Representations in Canadian, Russian, and Polish Literatures of the Twentieth Century

The dissertation focuses on the temporal-spatial representations of the ecological ideologies of modernity in the writings of Canadian authors Georges Bugnet, Sheila Watson, and Howard O’Hagan, Russian authors Andrei Bitov and Tatiana Tolstaia, and Polish author Czesław Miłosz.

 

Adrien Guyot
PhD French Language, Literature, and Linguistics 

 

 L'Amérique, un ailleurs partagé

 

 

Nataliya Bezborodova
MA Ukrainian Folklore

Nataliya

Maidan on Facebook: Sensitive, Expressive and Interpretative Protest Lore

The thesis traces Internet textual representations of the Maidan, a wide-scale protest movement that took place in 2013-2014 in Ukraine, and their function in identifying the opposing sides during the protests. These texts helped to formulate new narratives, articulate attitudes, and build relationships, create a sense of community within the protestors’ side, which had its impact on institutional changes of commemorative practices.

 

Lars Richter
PhD Germanic Languages and Literatures

Lars

Echoes and Oscillations: Poetics, Public Intellectualism, and Contemporary Literature in the Work of Juli Zeh

The dissertation Echoes and Oscillations: Poetics, Public Intellectualism, and Contemporary Literature in the Work of Juli Zeh examines the work of German author Juli Zeh. The dissertation is an exploration of how Zeh’s poetological positions, her work as a public intellectual and the incorporation of modes of realistic writing in her narratives result in an interplay between diegetic and non-diegetic realities that, in turn, have an impact on the question of what role literature can play in the present cultural landscape of Germany and beyond.

 

Marine Gheno
PhD French Languages, Literature and Linguistics

 

 

Femmes scandaleuses: le pouvoir transformatif de la transgression chez Virginie Despents, Nelly Arcan et aurélia aurita

 

 

Reem Alzaid
MA Comparative Literature

Reem

 

A Comparative Study of Thomas More’s Utopia and Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet

 

 

Jenny Osorio
MA Applied Linguistics

Jenny

Literature in the Language Classroom: Developing Reading Strategies in Beginner Spanish Students

Why is it difficult to include literature content in a language class? Reading in a second language may be stressful to certain students, caused by their limited linguistic skills and vocabulary, or lack of the cultural context assumed in literary texts (Grabe and Stoller, 2001, p. 189). The main goal of introductory language courses is the linguistic development of students; academic literacy is usually neglected at this level. More attention tolinguisticsis typically paid in upper-level courses (Allen and Paesani, 2010, p. 120). As students do not get enough exposure to literary and cultural material at the introductory levels, they are more likely to struggle when asked to do textual analysis. Bearing this divide in mind, My project discusses the progress made in the use of literary texts in foreign language classes by teaching reading strategies to beginner students of Spanish, facilitating the understanding of authentic literary material and decreasing their level of anxiety when facing the text.

 

Sabujkoli Bandopadhyay
PhD Comparative Literature

Sabu

Dominant, Dormant and Emergent Tendencies in the Twentieth Century Working-Class Novel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My project engages in a historicist reading of the genre of the working-class novel and presents a comparative study of literary texts from the UK, the USA, Canada, India, Kenya and Morocco.

Viktoriya Yakovlevya
PhD Social Theory and Cultural Studies

 

Childhood after Chornobyl: A Social History of Childhood in Ukraine 1986-1996  

Katherine Alexander
MA Translation Studies

 

Examining Themes of Gender in the Short Fiction of Carme Riera through Translation

 

 

Kateryna Kod
MA Ukrainian Folklore

 

Ethnocultural Identity and Edmonton Painters Recently from Ukraine

 

 

Dianna Brittian
MA Spanish and Latin American Studies

El nuevo cine argentino y la pobreza: ¿Cómo se retrata la pobreza causada por la política neoliberal menemista en las películas pertinentes al nuevo cine argentino?

 

Wenjuan Xie
PhD Comparative Literature

 

(Trans)Culturally Transgendered: Reading Transgender Narratives in (Late) Imperial China

 

 
Larisa Cheladyn
MA Ukrainian Folklore
Stitched Narratives: The Ukrainian Canadian Embroidered Pillow