100 - Level

 

Fall 2018

 

Music 101 - Introduction to Western Art Music

   Section A1  Section X01 
 Instructor:  TBA  Mary Ingraham
 Time:

 TR - 9:30 AM - 10:50AM

 T - 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 

MUSIC 101 offers an introduction to Western art music, also known as “classical music.”  Its goals are to develop basic music listening skills and to orient you to some of the major developments within that musical tradition.  The course will:
• introduce concepts and skills essential to close musical listening;
• provide several different approaches to listening to music;
• build a basic vocabulary for discussing music;
• introduce you to examples that illustrate musical developments and encourage your enjoyment and understanding of a variety of forms and styles; and
• raise questions about the meaning of this music in the past and the present: to whom was and is this music important and why?

 

Music 102 - Introduction to World Music

Instructor:  Julia Byl
Time:

 MWF - 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

 

This course will introduce students to selected world music cultures from throughout the world, including North America. In addition to learning about different musical traditions, we will also seek to relate them to larger cultural, religious, sociological, political, and geographical contexts. The emphasis of this class is to understand musical traditions in the terms of their performers and audience, and recognize their worth and value by expanding our own cultural and musical literacy.

 

Music 102: Introduction to World Music (Evening) 

Instructor:  Michael Frishkopf
Time:  W - 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 

In this introductory-level course we will examine music as a global, pan-human phenomenon (music of the world), together with various topics and issues in ethnomusicology (the study of music of the world in its cultural context). The course features an engagement with ethnographic film, and small-group collaborative as well as individual assignments.  While discovering world music through film, we will also: broaden our musical horizons, develop new musical capacities, expand our understanding music and its meanings understand music as both product and shaper of its environment, especially the power of music to effect change:  music as a ''technology'' learn to understand the world musically, learn how to think critically about (music) culture, and the ways it is represented (through music, or otherwise), be introduced to the discipline of ''ethnomusicology'', in preparation for further study in this discipline.

 

Music 103: Introduction to Popular Music

   Section A1   Section X01
Instructor:  TBA  TBA
Time:  MWF - 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM  R - 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 

How does music become “popular” and how is music an important part of our identity? What is the influence of the recording industry on our relationship to popular music? What role does the music industry play in the construction of stereotypes and how does popular music help to break down (and put up) social barriers? In Music 103: Introduction to Popular Music you will learn about popular music’s history, acquire critical listening skills, and develop the ability to write and reflect on popular music

 

Music 151: Aural and Keyboard Skills I (year long course) 

Instructor:  TBA
Time: 
 MWF - TBA

 

The focus of this course is on development of musical memory and reading skills through melodic solfège, rhythmical articulation, and identification of chords scales and intervals in dictation.  The course is supplemented with the study of diatonic keyboard harmony.  (This course is open to all Music majors and minors; please see calendar for prerequisites.)

 

Music 155: Music Theory I

Instructor:   TBA 
Time: 
 TR - 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
   F - 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

 

This is the first of a sequence of two semester-long foundational courses in music theory.  In Music 155, we focus on developing a common language for musical analysis, with emphasis on diatonic harmony and the study of musical excerpts from the common practice era.

 

 

Winter 2018

 

 

Music 100 - Fundamentals of Music

   Section B1  Section X50
Instructor:  Erik Reinart  Adam Robertson
Time:

 MWF - 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

 MW - 6:00 PM - 7:25 PM

 

The primary goal of MUSIC 100 is to help students to develop an understanding and fluency in the basic elements of music such as notation, scales, keys, meters, intervals, and chords.  The course is designed to meet the needs of music majors who require additional preparation for their entry into the first year theory cycle, and for non-music major instrumentalists who desire to upgrade their rudimentary music theory skills

 

Music 129 - Fundamental Keyboard Skills

Instructor:  TBA
Time:
 TBA

 

This is a year-long course intended to strengthen the keyboard skills required in Music 151 (Aural and Keyboard Skills) as well as for personal development.  The technical work and suitable repertoire studied aim to enhance the musical and interpretive skills of students.

 

Music 151 - Aural and Keyboard Skills I (year long course)

Instructor:  TBA
Time:
 MWF - TBA

 

The focus of this course is on development of musical memory and reading skills through melodic solfège, rhythmical articulation, and identification of chords scales and intervals in dictation.  The course is supplemented with the study of diatonic keyboard harmony.  (This course is open to all Music majors and minors; please see calendar for prerequisites.)

 

Music 156 - Music Theory II

Instructor:
 TBA
Time: 
 TR - 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
   F - 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

 

This course completes the foundational year in music theory, with a focus on diatonic and chromatic harmony and the study of musical excerpts from the classical and Romantic eras. 

 

Music 170 - Introduction to Music Composition and Sonic Arts

Instructor:  TBA
Time:
 TR - 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM

 

This course is an introduction to music composition and sonic arts, including both acoustic and electroacoustic methodologies.  Students will receive an introduction to concepts of planning and structure of sonic organization, unity and economy of materials, and variety in musical content.  Through a wide range of listening and reading exercises, as well as weekly compositional assignments, students will learn about a broad range of approaches to contemporary composition.  Although students should have a rudimentary understanding of basic Western music theory and notation, no formal training in composition is required.