500 - Level Undergraduate

Fall 2019

 

MUSIC 505 - Bibliography and Methods of Research

Instructor:
 Christina Gier
Time:
 TR - 14:00 - 15:20


This course introduces you to the processes and techniques for research in music and the importance of and methodologies for bibliography and citation. The class will help you start, plan, accomplish and document your research in ways that will support you throughout your graduate career and after. We will focus on the approaches necessary for successful musical and musicological research.

 

MUSIC 508 - Seminar On Music In Canada

Instructor:
    Mary Ingraham
Time:     W - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This seminar explores multi- and intercultural encounters in music and music-making in Canada. Through readings, listening, and discussion, students consider current and historical perspectives on Canadian culture, including issues relating to cultural identity, ways of listening, the impact of historical narratives, and potentialities for counter-discourse, as ways to develop new approaches to creative work. Repertoire considered includes art, popular, folk and traditional music, as well as documentary and film creations. And although the primary focus of the course is musical, the seminar will draw on theoretical models and approaches across disciplines and practices, including musicology, ethnomusicology, cultural studies, critical anthropology, and indigenous practices (among others). The purpose of this course is to enhance understanding of cultural representation in Canadian music, and to develop not only a critical understanding of specific works, but also a theoretical vocabulary for communicating  more broadly the complexity of musical expression experienced in a Canadian context. Considerations to deepen our understanding include: What are the challenges we face in developing appropriate theoretical approaches to music in Canada? How do these challenges frame our response to individual works? How have composers responded to social and political influences on their works? In what ways might music be considered a reflection of the interculturality of Canadian society? How does our investigation of interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives affect our listening, reading, and performing of the music of Canadian artists?

 

MUSIC 555 - Theory & Analysis: Music and Text

Instructor:
    Maryam Moshaver
Time:
    F 13;00-15:50

 

This seminar examines the many problems and registers of text-music interaction, with a focus on Romantic and Symbolist repertories of the 19th century. Beginning with the idea of mimesis, where music is seen to imitate or express in its own medium the images and sentiments presented in a poetic text, the seminar will focus on the critiques and radical transformations of this model in theories of affect and in the philosophical aesthetics of the 19th century, as well as in the compositional practice Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Wolf, and Debussy. Readings include texts by Rameau, Rousseau, Lessing, Goethe, Schlegel, Hanslick, Nietzsche, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Poe among others. Emphasis will be on reading, and on oral and written interpretive analysis.

 

MUSIC 566 - Advanced Topics in Ethnomusicology: Music Culture as a Social Network

Instructor:
Michael Frishkopf
Time TR - 11:00 - 12:20

Ethnomusicology is the study of music in or as society and culture. Social Network Analysis (SNA) is an application of mathematics (graph theory) to social and semantic phenomena. As SNA provides an insightful approach towards understanding society (social links) and culture (semantic links), it follows that SNA also provides an insightful means of thinking in ethnomusicology, and a productive tool for ethnomusicological research. Similarly, graph theory has been applied in many other disciplines - from computer science, to physics, to biology - resulting in a flourishing new field generally known as "network science".

In this course we consider ethnomusicology as "the study of music in, as, or generating networks." With this formulation, networks define the social and cultural contexts within which music operates; the channels through which music, musical artifacts, and knowledge about music, diffuse; and as the basis for musical performance. Music is also considered as a key factor in the formation of social networks. This network approach has become especially pertinent with the rise of social media, through which much music and musical knowledge passes.

Students will learn about social network analysis in theory and practice (including hands-on training using (free) software packages), with applications to music, and will conduct a small research project in this domain.


See http://bit.ly/mcsn19


MUSIC 570 - Composition Tutorials

Instructor:
    Mark Hannesson, Scott Smallwood
Time:
    TBA


In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

Winter 2020

 

MUSIC 506 - Analysis Through Performance

Instructor:
    Andriy Talpash
Time:
    M W 15:00-16:50


This course is one of three options available for the final, sixth semester of the music theory core. While in the first five semesters of the theory cycle we have cultivated basic analytical languages and competences (Theory I and II), followed by a historical survey of the transformation of musical styles and techniques from the Renaissance to the 20th century through verbal, analytical, and in written forms of expression (Theory III, IV, and V), Analysis Through Performance provides an opportunity for students to expand the concept of analysis to embrace performance as an end-product of theory and analysis, understood in the broad sense of cultivating a thinking relation with music. Course content will be focused on discussion, analysis, and performance of selected music from the contemporary repertoire, and will initiate students into some of the technical and aesthetic challenges of instrumental music from the 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisite: MUSIC 455 or consent of department.

 

MUSIC 571 - Composition Tutorials

Instructor:
     Mark Hannesson, Scott Smallwood
Time:
    TBA


In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

MUSIC 582 - Advanced Studies in Music and Gender

Instructor:
     Christina Gier
Time:      TR - 14:00-15:20

 

In this course, we will consider how music produces and facilitates gendered meanings in our social interactions and musical creativity. The syllabus introduces some fundamental historical and theoretical writings on the intersections of gender, sexuality and musicality and explores case studies of gender issues in musical practices and compositions from different eras. This class specifically will focus on how popular and artistic musical practices made meanings about identity and both changed and expressed ideas of gender over the 20th century in North America. An example topic is the role of popular song in expressing gender during the First World War. Another focus is the discussions around women instrumentalists in jazz and how the hundreds of “All-Girl” bands played all over the nation. In addition we will study rock, heavy metal, techno, and alternative masculinities and femininities, “disruptive divas” and trans identities in popular music.