Graduate Courses

Fall 2019

 

MUSIC 505 - Bibliography and Methods of Research

Instructor:
Christina Gier
Time: 
TR - 14:00 - 15:20

 

This course introduces you to the processes and techniques for research in music and the importance of and methodologies for bibliography and citation. The class will help you start, plan, accomplish and document your research in ways that will support you throughout your graduate career and after. We will focus on the approaches necessary for successful musical and musicological research.

 

MUSIC 508 - Seminar on Music In Canada

Instructor:
    Mary Ingraham
Time:
    W - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This seminar explores multi- and intercultural encounters in music and music-making in Canada. Through readings, listening, and discussion, students consider current and historical perspectives on Canadian culture, including issues relating to cultural identity, ways of listening, the impact of historical narratives, and potentialities for counter-discourse, as ways to develop new approaches to creative work. Repertoire considered includes art, popular, folk and traditional music, as well as documentary and film creations. And although the primary focus of the course is musical, the seminar will draw on theoretical models and approaches across disciplines and practices, including musicology, ethnomusicology, cultural studies, critical anthropology, and indigenous practices (among others). The purpose of this course is to enhance understanding of cultural representation in Canadian music, and to develop not only a critical understanding of specific works, but also a theoretical vocabulary for communicating  more broadly the complexity of musical expression experienced in a Canadian context. Considerations to deepen our understanding include: What are the challenges we face in developing appropriate theoretical approaches to music in Canada? How do these challenges frame our response to individual works? How have composers responded to social and political influences on their works? In what ways might music be considered a reflection of the interculturality of Canadian society? How does our investigation of interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives affect our listening, reading, and performing of the music of Canadian artists?

 

MUSIC 555 - Issues in Theory and Analysis: Music and Text

Instructor:
     Maryam Moshaver
Time:
    F - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This seminar examines the many problems and registers of text-music interaction, with a focus on Romantic and Symbolist repertories of the 19th century. Beginning with the idea of mimesis, where music is seen to imitate or express in its own medium the images and sentiments presented in a poetic text, the seminar will focus on the critiques and radical transformations of this model in theories of affect and in the philosophical aesthetics of the 19th century, as well as in the compositional practice Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Wolf, and Debussy. Readings include texts by Rameau, Rousseau, Lessing, Goethe, Schlegel, Hanslick, Nietzsche, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Poe among others. Emphasis will be on reading, and on oral and written interpretive analysis.

 

MUSIC 584 - Advanced Studies in Music and Society: Music Scenes and Creative Cities

Instructor:
    Brian Fauteux
Time:
    F - 9:00 - 11:50

 

This course investigates the various relationships between cities and their local musical activity. It considers the ways in which local identities and popular histories are shaped by music cultures (and vice versa). Drawing on a number of interdisciplinary theoretical and conceptual frameworks for studying local music (including popular music studies, media studies, cultural studies, and cultural geography) this course explores issues and themes such as: the transition from subcultural studies to music scene studies; cultural and municipal policies for local music; the cultural histories of specific music scenes; the role of music in branding “creative cities;” the ways in which music can be a force for forming localized social movements; the role of cities in shaping the sound and lyrics of songs; and, technology and global/translocal scenes. Students will be required to participate frequently throughout the course and to reflect critically on their own experience of music scenes (both here in Edmonton and beyond). We will also regularly evaluate the representation and documentation of local music scenes through a variety of texts (including documentaries, television shows, news stories, and so forth).

 

MUSIC 645 -Topics in Applied Music Technologies: Creating Interactive Sound Experiences: Sounds for the End of the World

Instructor:
 Scott Smallwood
Time: 
 TR - 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM
 

 

In this course, we will explore the conception and creation of interactive sound experiences through the creation of custom technologies.  Students are expected to work towards a final artistic/musical project that showcases their own technological mediations of sound, while addressing the theme "Sounds for the End of the World."  As part of our explorations, we will cover many topics including circuit bending, logic-chip synthesizer design, sensor interfacing and mapping, physical computing, and other topics that are raised through group explorations. The course will include an event/exhibition at the end of the course featuring student artistic projects.

 

MUSIC 660/760 - Composition Tutorials

Instructor:  Scott Smalwood, Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TBA

 

In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

MUSIC 630/ 635/ 638/ 730/ 738 - Choral Conducting

Instructor:
 Leonard Ratzlaff
Time:
 MWF - 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

 

The Graduate Choral Conducting course is a lab course that provides advanced student conductors (mostly doctoral and Masters graduate students who have qualified through audition in January of the previous year, but also qualified undergraduate students by special permission) a strong grounding in gestural conducting technique, a variety of rehearsal techniques and score analysis skills. The lab component involves a chamber ensemble of choral singers and instrumentalists, providing conductors with immediate response and feedback to their podium work. Repertoire is chosen from the full range of periods and styles. Evaluation of students is through periodic video-taped performance of the music being studied.

The Lab for this course is also available to students through the course number Music 477, a half course offered over both fall and winter terms. Consult Professor Ratzlaff if interested in participating in this course as a singer or instrumentalist.

 

MUSIC 665 - Issues in Ethnomusicology

Instructor:
Julia Byl
Time:
W - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This course will introduce you to the fundamentals of the academic study of world music (broadly concieved), ethnomusicology. We aim to understand how ethnomusicology has developed into its current diverse forms, incorporating popular, traditional, and court music; music of individuals and music of communities; sounds and structures as well as instruments; political and historical as well as cultural contexts. This course moves through some of the major developments in ethnomusicology, including forays into anthropology, linguistics, musicology, and area studies, and pays attention to the different methodological tools used in this field of research. You should develop both a familiarity with some major ethnomusicological thinkers and ideas, and an idea of how to employ their insights within your own research endeavors.

 

Winter 2020

 

MUSIC 661/761 - Graduate Composition Tutorials

Instructor:
 Scott Smallwood, Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TBA

 

In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

MUSIC 581 - Advanced Studies in Avant-Garde

Instructor: 
 Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TR - 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

 

This course is a seminar in Contemporary Vocal Music.  Each week we will investigate a piece of repertoire, a significant vocal composer, or an issue related to the subject.  Repertoire will include, Berio's Sequenza for voice, Vivier's Lonely Child, Saariaho's L'amour son loin, Glass’ Einstein on the Beach, Crumb’s Ancient Voices of Children, Davies’ Eight Songs for a Mad King, Cage’s Aria, Nono’s Il canto sospeso.  As well as the pieces surrounding these works as well.  We will look at the substantial vocal output of composers Meredith Monk, Robert Ashley, and Harrison Birtwistle. The course will try to look at where vocal music was in the late 20th and where it is now.

 

MUSIC 582 - Advanced Studies in Music and Gender

Instructor:
    Christina Gier
Time:
    TR - 14:00 - 15:20

 

In this course, we will consider how music produces and facilitates gendered meanings in our social interactions and musical creativity. The syllabus introduces some fundamental historical and theoretical writings on the intersections of gender, sexuality and musicality and explores case studies of gender issues in musical practices and compositions from different eras. Selected listening and texts will focus on music from across various stylistic genres and time periods.

 

MUSIC 595 - Music and Business

Instructor:
Guillaume Tardif
Time:
W -17:00 - 19:50

 

This course introduces students to specialized literature focusing on today's music careers and the business of music in a Canadian context. We will review basic concepts and discuss the intersections between music and business including how this may or will apply to you.

 

MUSIC 614 - Proseminar in Musicology

Instructor:
    Mary Ingraham
Time:
    W - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This graduate seminar offers an intensive introduction to a broad range of musicological discourse. Through weekly readings and discussions, students will become familiar with and examine the issues, methodologies, and writing styles that serve historical, theoretical, and performance objectives in recent scholarship within the discipline of musicology. The goal of the seminar is to enhance students’ conceptualization of these topics and the critical evaluation of scholarly research. Selected interdisciplinary approaches will be considered in order to increase familiarity with a wide range of musical concerns and interpretations applicable to many genres of music. Topics may include: history and historiography, biography, approaches to listening, intercultural encounters, intersensory studies, gender and sexuality, cultural and sociological perspectives on music and society, music and text, or music and place. Students will be involved in directed research topics, weekly readings, and in-class discussions and presentations. This course is open to all graduate students in music; students in related disciplines will need permission from the Department of Music to register.

 

MUSIC 633 - Seminar in Choral Literature I

Instructor:
    TBA
Time:    TR - 9:30 - 10:50

 

This seminar focuses on choral music (sacred and secular) from the late Middle Ages (Machaut) to the end of the Classical period (Haydn and Mozart). We will study representative genres, styles, composers, and compositions, considering them in historical context and exploring appropriate analytical strategies. The seminar will also include discussion of relevant editorial and performance practices. Students will become familiar with choral repertory, scholarly literature, and standard reference tools. A variety of seminar presentations and written papers are required, but there are no examinations in the course. Admission is open to all graduate students; the seminar may also be taken by qualified senior undergraduate students. This course is required along with Music 634 (Seminar in Choral Literature II, offered in alternating years) by graduate students in the choral conducting program.

 

MUSIC 651 - Seminar in Music Analysis: Analysis and Interpretation

Instructor:
    Maryam Moshaver
Time:     M - 13:00 - 15:50

 

This course focuses on developing approaches to musical analysis based on contextual and interactive modes of questioning.  We will draw primarily, though not exclusively, on music from the 19th-century piano repertory (Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, among others), and will consider this music from the standpoint of analytical and descriptive vocabularies which will permit us to bring to words, with some precision, insights and observations on the interaction of different musical parameters, whether harmonic, rhythmic, thematic, formal, narrative, or performative. In-class collective analyses will be supplemented by relevant readings on a range of topics, from music-analytical writings to historical, aesthetic, and literary texts.  Also relevant in this context are recent studies on performance practice and theories of embodied perception.