Graduate Courses

Fall 2018

 

Music 505 - Bibliography and Methods of Research

Instructor:
Christina Gier
Time: 
F - 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

 

This course introduces you to the processes and techniques for research in music and the importance of and methodologies for bibliography and citation. The class will help you start, plan, accomplish and document your research in ways that will support you throughout your graduate career and after. We will focus on the approaches necessary for successful musical and musicological research.

 

Music 513 - Topics in the History of Jazz

Instructor:
 Christina Gier
Time: 
 TR - 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM

 

Our course this term will explore jazz: its styles, its meanings, its contexts and history. What is jazz? What is the history of jazz? Who are the significant performers in this history? How did it develop? What social meanings emerge through jazz? We will listen to a great deal of music to address this question fully and develop ways to talk about it as we learn about the people who created it.  

 

Music 545 - Seminar in Computer App in Music 

Instructor:
 Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TR - 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM
 

 

This course is an introduction to coding interactive programs for sound artists and musicians. The language used for this course is Cycling 74's Max patching language, which is one of the most widely used interactive media languages in the digital arts. We will also touch on a few other languages commonly used in computer music, such as Pd and ChucK. Additionally, the course will survey a number of sound and music-based artworks that make use of these technologies to accomplish an array of fascinating artistic visions and interactive environments. All students in the course will learn the basics of Max, and will create a final project in the form of a musical performance, interactive system, or installation, which will be shown to the public in a final semester exhibition.

 

Music 570/660/760 - Composition Tutorials

Instructor:  Scott Smalwood, Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TBA

 

In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing
various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

Music 589 - Music and Identity

Instructor:
 Julia Byl
Time: 
 W - 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

 

How are our identities shaped by society, and what role does music play in this shaping? An identity can be broad (Canadian, LGBTQ, Spanish-speaking, Asian) or very niche (one of the ten people who liked that band before it got big). Through readings, listening, and discussion, we will explore the ways identities are expressed, globally. We will look at techno and punk scenes; examine national and regional cultures in Indonesia, Russia, and Zimbabwe; analyze the contents of our own playlists; and take on issues like globalization, intersectionality, and appropriation—all filtered through a music studies perspective. This course will also introduce some of the core concepts and issues of ethnomusicology through an engagement with the work of scholars of music and identity. 

 

Music 595 - Music and Business

Instructor:
 Guillaume Tardif
Time: 
 W - 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 

This course introduces students to specialized literature focusing on today's music careers and the business of music in a Canadian context. We will review basic concepts and discuss the intersections between music and business including how this may or will apply to you.

 

Music 630/ 635/ 638/ 730/ 738 - Choral Conducting

Instructor:
 Leonard Ratzlaff
Time:
 MWF - 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

 

The Graduate Choral Conducting course is a lab course that provides advanced student conductors (mostly doctoral and Masters graduate students who have qualified through audition in January of the previous year, but also qualified undergraduate students by special permission) a strong grounding in gestural conducting technique, a variety of rehearsal techniques and score analysis skills. The lab component involves a chamber ensemble of choral singers and instrumentalists, providing conductors with immediate response and feedback to their podium work. Repertoire is chosen from the full range of periods and styles. Evaluation of students is through periodic video-taped performance of the music being studied.

The Lab for this course is also available to students through the course number Music 477, a half course offered over both fall and winter terms. Consult Professor Ratzlaff if interested in participating in this course as a singer or instrumentalist.

 

Music 650 - Theory Proseminar in Music Theory 

Instructor:
 Maryam Moshaver
Time: 
 W - 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

 

This seminar focuses on the intersections between Music Theory and the principal academic sub-disciplines of Musicology and Ethnomusicology.  It will examine the modalities of theoretical exploration in a broad range of scientific and humanistic discourses, as exemplified in recent music-theoretical writings.  Topics include the interactions of theory with analysis, aesthetics, transcription, postmodernist and structuralist discourse, psychology, phenomenology, history, semiotics, and literature, among others.  Our focus will be on close critical reading of texts as well as on developing different approaches to writing analytically about musical works.

 

 

Winter 2019

 

 

Music 556 - Seminar in Music Theory: Theories of Time and Meter

Instructor:
 Maryam Moshaver
Time: 
 W - 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

 

This course is devoted to exploring the dimension of musical analysis and experience that is articulated in theories of meter and rhythm.  We will be concerned with theories of metrical generation, stratification, repetition, conflict, accent, and with exploring languages for conceptualizing and analyzing the interplay between the different temporal parameters of music.   Emphasis will be on in-class collective analysis supplemented by relevant readings from a range of music-analytical writings.  Works will be drawn primarily, but not exclusively, from the tonal repertoire.

 

Music 570/571/661/761 - Graduate Composition Tutorials

Instructor:
 Scott Smallwood, Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TBA

 

In either or both acoustic and electronic mediums, Music 570, 571, 660, 661, and 760, 761 are all tutorial-based courses in ‘free’ composition. Regular critiquing and coaching will assist the student in developing
various compositional techniques and strategies, as well as encouraging informed, independent creative musical thought and expression. To ensure that diverse learning experiences occur, emphasis is placed on composing shorter, multi-movement works that are concise, well-structured, and clearly focused with regard to artistic objectives and compositional means.

 

Music 572 - Area Studies in Ethnomusicology

Instructor:
 Michael Frishkopf
Time: 
 TR - 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM

 

This seminar course centers on understanding music and other performance arts in Africa as a sustainable strategy for social cohesion, progress and transformation. We will study musical types across the continent, traditional and contemporary, local and interventionist, from the perspective of their efficacy for social progress. In particular, we will study Music for Global Human Development (m4ghd.org) -- applying music as a collaborative social technology towards social justice across a spectrum of issues, from health and education, to peace, civil society, and social integration. We will focus on application of these ideas and methods in Egypt, Liberia, Ghana, Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, South Africa, and elsewhere, through critical review of current literature, local practices, and musical interventions both past and present. We will also design m4ghd projects for the future.  NB: There are no prerequisites. The course is offered for both undergraduate and graduate credit.

 

Music 580 - Advanced Survey of Contemporary Music and Sonic Arts 

Instructor: 
 Mark Hannesson
Time: 
 TR - 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

 

This course is a survey of compositional trends and styles in contemporary music since 1945. In particular, we will focus on music and sonic art created in the last 25 years, drawing connections to the traditions of the avant-garde from the mid-20th century. The course will follow a seminar format, exploring music through score reading, listenings, readings, films, and discussion, culminating in a major writing and presentation project.

 

Music 634 - Graduate Choral Literature II

Instructor:
 Leonard Ratzlaff
Time: 
 TR - 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM
 

 

This seminar focuses on choral music from 1800 to the present day; representative works from each period are studied, with a view to placing them in historical context, as well as tracing musical influences and the emergence of particular forms (both sacred and secular). Admission is open to all graduate students, and can also be taken by qualified senior undergraduate students. This course is required along with Music 633 (Graduate Choral Literature I, offered in alternating years) by graduate students in the choral conducting program. A variety of seminar presentations and written papers are required, but no examination is given at the end of the class.

 

Music 670 - Prosem Popular Music

Instructor:
 Brian Fauteux
Time: 
 F - 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

 

Music 670 is a proseminar that provides an overview of the history, issues, and methodologies in Popular Music Studies and its related fields, and explores music in its variety of popular and mediated forms. It will critically evaluate the production, reception, performance, and circulation of popular music and explore the various ways in which popular music communicates ideologies, meanings, aesthetics, forms of resistance, and cultural and technological shifts. We focus on the processes and methods that popularize music and facilitate its ability to reach audiences, both historically and in a contemporary context. A key component of this proseminar is the use of a Media Studies approach to the study of popular music, paying special attention to issues of power, industries, identity, sound technology, visual media, cultural policy, and cultural geography. This course is open to all graduate students in the Department of Music and students in related disciplines are welcome to join through obtaining permission of the Instructor.