Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute Research Day

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Proudly hosted by the Neuroscience Graduate Student Association
  • Thursday, March 5, 2020
  • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
  • Bernard Snell Hall
  • $25 Registration | FREE for NMHI Students and NMHI members
    All attendees planning to attend the lunch portion must register using the sign up button (right side column)

Schedule of Events

  • Opening Remarks - 9:00 AM to 9:15 AM
    From Dr. Douglas Zochodne, Neurologist and Neuroscientist, Divisional Director of Neurology at the University of Alberta and Director of the Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute
  • Student Oral Presentations - 9:15 AM -11:45 AM
    Each presentation will be a 7 minute talk followed by 3 minutes for questions, giving the opportunity to present their research and take questions from the audience. You can sign up to present on your research using the sign up button (right side column). As time is limited for the oral presentation portion of the day, NMHI student will be given priority. All abstracts will be reviewed and approved by the NGSA before confirming your presentation slot.
    Includes the following presenters: Alice Atkin, Nicholas Batty, Lion Budrass, Caylin Chadwick, Britt Fedor, Ewen Lavoie, Andrew Schmaus, Joseph Kamtchum Tatuene and Rachel Ward-Flanagan.
  • Lunch - 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    Only available to those who have pre-registered.
  • Panel Discussion - 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
    Back by popular demand, "Career Options for Science Grads." We will open up questions to our three speakers who offer a variety of insights on the career paths available to grads.
    • ACADEMIA - Dr. Anastassia Voronova, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Genetics and NMHI member
    • INDUSTRY - Dr. Jason Acker, PhD, Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology
    • MEDICINE - Dr. Valerie Sim, MD, Associate Professor, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine and NMHI member
  • Student Poster Sessions - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    You can sign up to present on your research using the sign up button (right side colum). All abstracts will be reviewed and approved by the NGSA before confirming your presentation slot.
    Includes the following presenters: Rebecca Long, Aislinn Maguire, Matthew Doan, Krista Metz, Charbel Baaklini, Behdad Parhizi, Sebastian Caballero, Mischa Bandet, Pedram Parnianpour, Komal Bharti, Brian Marriott, Nicole Dittmann, Shane Nicholls, Joseph Kamtchum Tatuene, Avyarthana Dey, Emma Schmidt, Adrianne Watson, Cierra Stiegelmar, Krishnapriya Hari, David Roszko, Tejal Aslesh, Wojciech Pietrasik, Somnath Gupta, Shihao Lin, Ryan Moukhaiber, Brandon E. Hauer, Vaibhavi Kadam, Hailey Pineau, Abhishek Dahal, Jennifer Bertrand, Bahareh Behroozi Asl, Timo Friedman, Zoe Dworsky-Fried, John Monyror and Sucheta Chakravarty
  • Keynote Address - 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
    Dr. Giulio Tononi

    MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Director of the Wisconsin Institute for Sleep and Consciousness

Keynote Presentation
Dr. Giulio TononiConsciousness: From Theory to Practice
What is consciousness, and what is its neural substrate in the brain? Why are certain parts of the brain important for consciousness, but not others that have even more brain cells and are just as complicated? Why does consciousness fade with dreamless sleep even though the brain remains active? Does consciousness always fade when patients become unresponsive after brain damage, during generalized seizures, during general anesthesia, or even in deep sleep? And are newborns, animals, and intelligent computers conscious?

Integrated Information Theory (IIT) is an attempt to answer these and other questions in a principled manner. IIT starts not from the brain, but from consciousness itself - the world of experience – and derives from it what it takes for a system to be conscious. The results of this exploration can account for many empirical findings, lead to counterintuitive predictions, and has motivated the development of promising new tests for the practical assessment of consciousness in non-communicative subjects.