Spring 2017

Books

People Shock

PeopleShock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule

Business/Management
by Tema Frank, ’68 BA, ’75 MSc, Essential Views Publishing, available on Amazon

PeopleShock combines original case studies, data and useful advice to help organizations succeed in a hyper-competitive, digitized economy.


James Legge and the Chinese Classics

James Legge and the Chinese Classics: A Brilliant Scot in the Turmoil of Colonial Hong Kong

Biography
by Marilyn Laura Bowman, ’61 BA, FriesenPress, friesenpress.com

This biography recounts the life of James Legge (1815-97), a Scottish scholar and missionary, famous for translating the Chinese classics during a period of conflict between Britain and China.


People Migrations in Europe and America

People Migrations in Europe and America: Nation Building Prehistory to 1913

History
by Myrtle Macdonald, ’44 Dip(Nu), ’45 BScN, CreateSpace, available on Amazon

People Migrations shows how the movement of tribes and changing borders of nations contributed to the evolution of culture, languages, science, health care, music, art and architecture.


In My World

In My World

Children’s Literature
by Jillian Ma, ’08 BA, ’11 BEd, Future Horizons, fhautism.com

In My World follows an autistic child’s imaginative journey to be accepted, loved and celebrated for his strengths and abilities.


The Complete Canadian Book Editor

The Complete Canadian Book Editor

Textbook
by Leslie Vermeer, ’90 BA(Hons), ’97 MA, ’03 MEd, ’12 PhD, Brush Education Inc., brusheducation.ca

This resource provides step-by-step guidelines for book editors, including how to build and manage author relationships, acquire and develop manuscripts, and edit and proof for print and ebooks.


The Frontier of Patriotism

The Frontier of Patriotism: Alberta and the First World War

History
Edited by Adriana A. Davies, ’65 BA, ’67 MA, and Jeff Keshen, University of Calgary Press, press.ucalgary.ca

Drawing on primary accounts, these essays take an in-depth look at Alberta’s involvement in the First World War, reflecting experiences both on the battlefield and on the home front.


Last Entry

Last Entry

Fiction
by Rick Will, ’85 PhD, self-published, available on Amazon

The Arctic quickly proves to be an unforgiving place for an archeology professor and his students, as they are confronted with animal attacks, sickness, dwindling food supplies and hypothermia.


Selling Science

Selling Science: Polio and the Promise of Gamma Globulin

History
by Stephen E. Mawdsley, ’06 BA(Hons), ’08 MA, Rutgers University Press, rutgersuniversitypress.org

Recounting the story of the first large clinical trial to control polio in the 1950s, Mawdsley explores the ethics of scientific conduct and the shaping of public opinion on medical experimentation.


Nuala

Nuala 

Fiction
by Kimmy Beach, ’98 BA(Hons), University of Alberta Press, uap.ualberta.ca

A giant adolescent puppet becomes self-aware in a dystopian world of love and treachery in this original and inventive work reminiscent of Margaret Atwood, José Saramago and Kazuo Ishiguro.


Indigenous Writes

Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis & Inuit Issues in Canada

Non-fiction
by Chelsea Vowel, ’00 BEd, ’09 LLB, HighWater Press, portageandmainpress.com

Vowel’s essays explore the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada, focusing on issues surrounding the terminology of relationships; culture and identity; myth-busting; state violence; and land, learning, law and treaties.


The Duende of Tetherball

The Duende of Tetherball

Poetry
by Tim Bowling, ’97 MA, Nightwood Editions, nightwoodeditions.com

Bowling’s poetry strives to account for and address our human need to resolve the tension between personal freedom and a world burdened by increasing homogenization and centralized control.


A Floating Phrase

A Floating Phrase

Fiction
by Trent Portigal, ’12 MA, Roundfire Books, roundfire-books.com

A Floating Phrase explores the nature of art, fear and snow puddles through the experiences of Cesarine, a stop-motion animator caught up in the intrigues of international diplomacy in 1970s continental Europe.


Believing is Not the Same as Being Saved

Believing is Not the Same as Being Saved

Poetry
by Lisa Martin, ’04 BA(Hons), ’06 MA, University of Alberta Press, uap.ualberta.ca

This collection of lyrical poetry takes as its broad theme the ways in which loss is not fully experienced in the moment, but rather configured in the ordinary details of the world.


Farm Workers in Western Canada

Farm Workers in Western Canada: Injustices and Activism

Non-fiction
Edited by Shirley A. McDonald, ’13 PhD, and Bob Barnetson, University of Alberta Press, uap.ualberta.ca

Bill 6, the government of Alberta’s contentious farm workers’ safety legislation, sparked public debate as no other legislation has done in recent years. Nine essays provide context for the legislation.


A Canadian Childhood

A Canadian Childhood

Memoir
by Carolyn D. Redl, ’78 BA(Spec), ’83 MA, ’91 PhD, FriesenPress, friesenpress.com

A memoir of growing up on a northern Saskatchewan farm in the 1940s and ’50s captures a vital moment in Canada’s social history, when women’s roles were just starting to become less restricted.


Tar Wars: Oil, Environment and Alberta

Tar Wars: Oil, Environment and Alberta’s Image

Non-fiction
by Geo Takach, ’81 BA, ’85 LLB, ’03 MA, University of Alberta Press, uap.ualberta.ca

Tar Wars offers a critical inside look at the international battle over Alberta’s bituminous sands, as leaders negotiate escalating tensions between continuous economic growth and unsustainable environmental costs.


The Life and Work of W.B. Nickerson

The Life and Work of W.B. Nickerson (1865-1926): Scientific Archaeology in Central North America

Biography
by Ian Dyck, ’76 PhD, University of Ottawa Press, press.uottawa.ca

This biography details the life of American archeologist William Baker Nickerson as he investigated sites from New England to the Midwest and into the Canadian Prairies.