Faculty & Staff

Jim-Denison---Associate-Professor

Jim Denison, PhD, MEd, BA

Associate Professor

Physical Education and Recreation

About Me

Degrees
Ph.D. in Kinesiology; Major: Sport Sociology (1990-94)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA
Dissertation: Sport retirement: Personal troubles, public faces

M.Ed. in Education; Major: Educational Psychology (1988-90) 
University of Toledo, OH, USA
Thesis: Self-efficacy and runners

BA Political Science (1981-86) 
Fordham University, NY, USA


Background

  • Former NCAA Division I middle-distance runner (3:43.50 1500m PB)
  • Former high school and university cross-country and middle-distance running coach (1986-1992)
  • Lecturer in Sport Psychology, University of Waikato, New Zealand (1994-2001)
  • Lecturer in Sport, Media and Culture, De Montfort University, Great Britain (2001-2004)
  • Lecturer in Sports Coaching, University of Bath, Great Britain (2004-2006) 
  • Joined the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation as an Associate Professor in 2007

Research

Dr. Denison studies coaching from a socio-cultural perspective. More specifically, through the work of Michel Foucault, he views coaching as a social act whereby what coaches know and do on an everyday basis is as much a relational process as it is a scientific one. As a result, he is interested in a variety of topics such as the coach-athlete relationship, power and coaching, training methodology, coaching ethics and coach and athlete learning. Importantly, through his analysis of these topics he is at all times conscious and concerned with making direct and practical links back to what coaches do everyday with the athletes in front of them.

He currently supervises a number of graduate students working in coaching studies including one Ph.D, student and three MA Thesis students.


Teaching

KIN 245 Introduction to the Profession of Coaching

KIN 347 Applied Coaching Practice

KIN 447 Advanced Topics in Coaching

PERLS 575 Coaching Knowledges: The Social Dimensions of Performance Sport

PERLS 582 Principles of Performance: Programming and Pedagogy