Areas of Research

Physiology

What is Physiology? 

Our exercise physiologists examine mechanisms associated with physical activity in a range of different populations, including but not limited to athletes, pregnant women, and individuals in physically demanding professions.

 

Focus of Research


Dr. Normand Boulé

Dr. Boulé's research program focuses on the role of exercise in preventing and managing diabetes. The majority of his projects involve adults with type 2 diabetes and examine physiological outcomes related to glycemic control or physical fitness.

Dr. Margie Davenport
Dr. Davenport's principle research interest is the investigation of maternal-fetal health outcomes, and an exploration of the preventative role of exercise and/or lifestyle interventions in the development of chronic disease.

Dr. Darren DeLorey
Dr. DeLorey’s research interests focus on the neural control of the cardiovascular system and rest and in response to acute and chronic exercise in health and disease.

Dr. Michael Kennedy
Dr. Kennedy's current research interests include: environmental and training related factors influencing lung function in athletes; and relationship between training stress, health status and performance.

Dr. Stewart Petersen
Dr. Petersen's research interest focuses on thermal, metabolic and cardiopulmonary consequences of protective clothing and equipment ensembles and load carriage in occupational applications such as military, structural and wildland firefighting, and search and rescue.

Dr. Craig Steinback
Dr. Steinback's research interest is how the body responds and adapts to environments, activities and conditions that are associated with reduced oxygen availability. More specifically, he studies how the sympathetic nervous system is activated during exposure to low oxygen, and how it acts to control blood flow to critical organs and tissues.

Dr. Charles Putman
Dr. Putman's current research is to discover the mechanistic underpinnings of muscle plasticity in healthy and diseased states on two fronts: (1) to establish the type and magnitude of contributions made by endogenous populations of pre-mitotic muscle stem cells in healthy and sarcopenic states; (2) to determine which intracellular signaling pathways are responsible for directing adaptive changes, also within healthy and sarcopenic skeletal muscles.