Spring courses 2020

POL S 101: INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

An introduction to major political concepts and to the study of politics.

Note: Not open to students with credit in POL S 100 or 103.

SECTION DAYS INSTRUCTOR EMAIL

LEC A1 MW Ghada Hamdan ageel@ualberta.ca

POL S 211: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEORY

Explores how texts from the history of western political theory, from ancient Greece to the 20th century, help to deepen and diversify our understanding of themes like justice, freedom, equality, property, rights, and democracy.

Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in POL S 210. Prerequisite: POL S 101 or consent of Department

LEC A1 MW Mark Blythe dblythe@ualberta.ca

POL S 225: CANADIAN POLITICS

Examines the context and dynamics of Canadian politics.

Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in POL S 220. Prerequisites: POL S 101 or consent of Department.

LEC A1 TR Daisy Raphael dmraphae@ualberta.ca

POL S 250: THE POLITICS OF GENDER

An examination of gender, diversity and relations of power in political life.

Prerequisite: POL S 101 or consent of Department.

LE A1 MW Margot Challborn mchallbo@ualbreta.ca

POL S 261: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

An introduction to contemporary international relations that attempts to develop an understanding of political events at the international level. The course covers the nature of foreign policy, the dynamics of interactions between states, the causes of war, imperialism and the role of non-state actors.

Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in POL S 260. Prerequisite: POL S 101 or consent of Department

LEC A1 TR Hajar Amidian amidian@ualberta.ca

POL S 459: TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

SEM A1 - Nationalism: Myth and Reality - Nationalism, anti-globalization, opposition to immigration are once again roiling politics on every continent. The election of President Donald Trump in the United States, the vote for Brexit in the UK, and the growing power of right-wing populist parties in Europe all are examples of political movements clinging to nativism to push their agenda. Drawing upon theories from political science, anthropology, and sociology, this course seeks to assess how and why nationalism came to be significant in contemporary political life. It studies the development of various theories of nationalism, as well as the real political stakes set in employing the nation. Theoretical readings will be supplemented with empirical studies from developed and developing countries across different time periods.

A variable content course, which may be repeated if topics vary.

Prerequisite: One of POL S 261 (or 260) or Department consent.

SEM A1 TR Ehsan Kashfi kashfi@ualberta.ca

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