School of Library and Information Studies

LIS 541: LIS Services in Culturally Diverse Society

Course Outline 
Fall 2017

Instructor: Dr. Danielle Allard
Email: allard@ualberta.ca
Phone:
(780) 492-2605
Office:
3-11 Rutherford South
Class times: Wednesday: 6:00pm.8:50 pm. in 3-22 Rutherford South

Calendar Description:

Examines the central concepts of diversity and inclusion and a range of related issues and contributions with respect to specific populations and traditionally underrepresented groups, and their support systems, in library and information settings. 

Course Objectives:

1.      Understand basic concepts and terminology relating to diversity and inclusion in the context of library and information settings in culturally diverse society.

2.    Identify and analyze multiple meanings of diversity and inclusion and discuss them in relation to a range of themes and theoretical frameworks (e.g., multiculturalism, feminist theory and praxis, intersectionality, decolonization, global citizenship, universal access to information).

3.      Have awareness of advocacy, activism, and leadership perspectives supporting a place for specific populations and traditionally underrepresented groups in library, archives, and information settings and discourses.

4.      Appreciate both theoretical and practical service-oriented issues and concerns regarding library, archives, and information use by a range of specific populations and traditionally underrepresented groups.

5.      Communicate through both oral and written means information professionals’ roles in promotion and advocacy of diversity, access, and equity in culturally diverse society.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1.      Through in-class activities and assignments, students will be able to articulate basic concepts and terminology relating to diversity and inclusion in the context of library, archives, and information settings in culturally diverse society.

2.      Through exposure to advocacy and leadership perspectives supporting a place for specific populations and traditionally underrepresented groups in library and information settings and discourses, students will be able to appreciate both theoretical and practical service-oriented issues and concerns, including evaluation of policies, collections, programs, and services.

3.      After critical examination of library and information studies (and related) theory and practice, students will be able to identify and analyze major issues and emergent trends with respect to LIS services in culturally diverse society.

4.      Through paired projects, individual assignments, class discussions and readings, students will increase their communication and problem-solving skills and will gain a greater understanding of the challenges and benefits of collaborative work.

5.      Through written paper(s) and assignments, students will demonstrate awareness of both opportunities and threats to the development of a diverse and inclusive profession and discipline, and will articulate an increased knowledge about diversity in multiple contexts relating to library, archives, and information settings.

Content:

History of diversity and inclusion issues in LIS, Library policies and strategies for serving LGBTQ* minorities, race and ethnicity on the Internet, Information practices of migrants and refugees, feminist and community based classification, access to information for marginalized communities, global citizenship, and Indigenous knowledges and archiving. 

Methods:

Lectures, readings, in class discussions, small group discussions, group work, classroom facilitation, in class activities, guest speakers, and assignments

Course Relationships:


Pre-requisite:

LIS 501 (or permission of instructor)

Required Texts:

Lee, D. & Mahalakshmi, K. (Eds). (2014). Aboriginal and Visible Minority Librarians: Oral Histories from Canada. Lanham: R&L Publishers.

Inclusive Language & Equity:

The Faculty of Education is committed to providing an environment of equality and respect for all people within the university community, and to educating faculty, staff and students in developing teaching and learning contexts that are welcoming to all. The Faculty recommends that students and staff use inclusive language to create a classroom atmosphere in which students’ experiences and views are treated with equal respect and value in relation to their gender, racial background, sexual orientation, and ethnic backgrounds. Students who require accommodations in this course due to a disability affecting mobility, vision, hearing, learning, or mental or physical health are advised to discuss their needs with Student Accessibility Services.

Academic Integrity:

The University of Alberta is committed to the highest standards of academic integrity and honesty. Students are expected to be familiar with these standards regarding academic honesty and to uphold the policies of the University in this respect. Students are particularly urged to familiarize themselves with the provisions of the Code of Student Behaviour and avoid any behaviour which could potentially result in suspicions of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of facts and/or participation in an offence. Academic dishonesty is a serious offence and can result in suspension or expulsion from the University.

Policy about course outlines can be found in Section 23.4(2) of the University Calendar.