School of Library and Information Studies

LIS 598 Emerging and Evolving Technologies

LIS 598 Special Topics: Emerging and Evolving Technologies

Course Outline

Winter 2018


Course Instructor: Robyn Stobbs

Email: stobbs@ualberta.ca

Phone: (780) 868-2253

Office Hours:

3-06B Rutherford South

Thursdays, 12:00 - 2:00 PM


Class Time: Thursdays, 9:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Class Location: 3-01 Rutherford South

 


Calendar Description:

This course will cover an introduction to different emerging and evolving technologies that are (or can be) used in the Library and Information Science (LIS) and other domains. Includes an introduction to different aspects of Open Source Software (OSS); Social Media such as wikis, blogs, mashups and social networking; and other emerging technologies and concepts such as cloud computing.


Course Objectives:

After completing this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand introductory concepts and theories of the Open Source Software (OSS) domain,

  • Critique the benefits and challenges in the use and adoption of Open Source Software in context, and evaluate and recommend software products,

  • Create frameworks to evaluate technologies for implementation in specific LIS contexts,

  • Analyze, critique, and evaluate various technologies for use in LIS contexts, and

  • Explore emerging technology trends in LIS contexts and synthesize and present their findings.


Student Learning Outcomes:

The course objectives will be demonstrated through the following measurable outcomes:

  • Students will evaluate and recommend an appropriate Open Source Software product and a proprietary software product for specific use by drawing on reported research, published information, case examples, and course discussions and materials.

    - Assessment: Software Review and Recommendation - Group Project (presentation and paper)
  • Students will be able to critically analyze various facets of emerging and evolving technologies covered in class.
    - Assessment: Discussion Facilitation and Reflection Assignment, Class Contribution

  • Students will be able to synthesize academic and professional literature on emerging technologies relevant in LIS contexts to create a presentation for their colleagues on a specific technology’s properties, trends, and potential uses.
    - Assessment: Technology Fair Assignment


Program Learning Outcomes:

The following overall learning outcomes for the MLIS program are addressed in this course:

  • PLO 3: Demonstrate critical thinking, analytical capacities, and problem-solving skills.

  • PLO 5: Communicate effectively and professionally.

  • PLO 9: Examine the impact, importance, and limitations of technologies in personal, professional, and social contexts as well as in library and information studies settings.


Content:

This course covers technologies and technology trends in use, or potentially of use, in library and information service settings. Topics covered include:

Open Source Software (OSS)

          Virtual and Augmented Reality
Cloud Computing
          Technologies of/for Reading
Social Media
          Digitization
Creative Spaces (e.g., Makerspaces)
          Gamification and Instructional Technologies

Methods:

Seminar-style discussion, in-class exercises, lectures, and guest speakers

Course Relationships:

Pre- or co-requisite: LIS 501 and/or consent of the Instructor. This course counts as an IT requirement for the MLIS program.


Required Texts:

There is no required textbook for this class. Please see the course schedule for the reading list. The readings are carefully chosen and are available online or electronically through University of Alberta Libraries. Students are expected to prepare for, and actively participate, in every discussion.

Assignments and Weighting:

Assessment

Weighting

Discussion Facilitation and Reflection Assignment

15%

Software Review and Recommendation – Group Project

  • Presentation

  • Paper

35%


10%

25%

Technology Fair Assignment

25%

Class Contribution

  • Discussion

  • In-class activities

  • Self-evaluation paragraph

25%

10%

10%

5%

TOTAL:

100%


Late Assignment Policy:

A 10% per day (including weekends) penalty will be applied to late assignments. For example, the grade on an assignment 2 days late will be docked 20%. So, if the assignment was worth 20 marks, the grade will be docked 4 marks. Exceptions to this policy are at the instructor’s discretion for extenuating circumstances.


School of Library and Information Studies Grading Statement:

Grades reflect professional judgements of student achievement made by instructors. These judgements are based on a combination of absolute achievement and relative performance in class. The instructor should mark in terms of raw scores, rank the assignments in order of merit, and with due attention to the verbal descriptions of the various grades, assign an appropriate final letter grade. Grades are calculated in accordance with the SLIS Grading Procedure.


Academic Integrity:

The University of Alberta is committed to the highest standards of academic integrity and honesty.  Students are expected to be familiar with these standards regarding academic honesty and to uphold the policies of the University in this respect. Students are particularly urged to familiarize themselves with the provisions of the Code of Student Behavior (online at http://www.governance.ualberta.ca/) and avoid any behaviour which could potentially result in suspicions of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of facts and/or participation in an offence. Academic dishonesty is a serious offense and can result in suspension or expulsion from the University.


Students should also be mindful of the SLIS Copyright Policy (http://www.slis.ualberta.ca/Resources/~/media/slis/Documents/Resources/SLISPoliciesandDocuments/SLIS_Copyright_Policy.pdf).


Inclusive Language and Equity:

The Faculty of Education is committed to providing an environment of respect for all people within the university community and to educating faculty, staff and students in developing teaching and learning contexts that are welcoming to all. The Faculty recommends that students and staff use inclusive language to create a classroom atmosphere in which students’ experiences and views are treated with equal respect and value in relation to their gender, racial background, sexual orientation and ethnic background. Students who require accommodations in this course due to a disability or chronic health condition affecting mobility, vision, hearing, learning, or mental or physical health are advised to discuss their needs with Student Accessibility Services.

Recording of Lectures:

Audio or video recording, digital or otherwise, of lectures, labs, seminars or any other teaching environment by students is allowed only with the prior written consent of the instructor or as a part of an approved accommodation plan. Student or instructor content, digital or otherwise, created and/or used within the context of the course is to be used solely for personal study, and is not to be used or distributed for any other purpose without prior written consent from the content author(s).


Policy about course outlines can be found in Section 23.4(2) of the University Calendar.

Recording of Lectures:

Audio or video recording, digital or otherwise, of lectures, labs, seminars or any other teaching environment by students is allowed only with the prior written consent of the instructor or as a part of an approved accommodation plan. Student or instructor content, digital or otherwise, created and/or used within the context of the course is to be used solely for personal study, and is not to be used or distributed for any other purpose without prior written consent from the content author(s).

Policy about course outlines can be found in Section 23.4(2) of the University Calendar.