School of Library and Information Studies

LIS 538 Outline

LIS 538: Digital Libraries

Winter 2019
Course Outline


Instructor: Ali Shiri

Email: ashiri@ualberta.ca

 

Calendar Description:

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the concept, development, types and trends of digital libraries. This course will focus on the creation, organization, access, use, and evaluation of digital libraries with a view to socioeconomic and cultural issues.

Course Objectives:

By the end of the course students should be able to:

  • Gain a critical understating of the concept of and approaches to digital libraries
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the issues of information representation, organization, access and retrieval in digital libraries
  • Develop methods and skills to analyze and evaluate the major components of digital libraries
  • Identify and discuss technical, social, economic and cultural implications of digital libraries
  • Develop a small digital library using open source software

Measurable Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

  • After writing a critical paper on digital libraries, students will gain an understanding of the concept of and approaches to digital libraries.
  • Through building a digital library and in evaluating an existing digital library, students will demonstrate an understanding of the issues of information representation, organization, access, and retrieval in digital libraries.
  • Through building a digital library and in evaluating an existing digital library, students will develop methods and skills to analyze and evaluate the major components of digital libraries.
  • Through class discussion, a critical paper, and in evaluating an existing digital library, students will demonstrate their abilities in identifying and discussing technical, social, economic, and cultural implications of digital libraries.
  • Through building a digital library using Greenstone, students will demonstrate their ability to develop a small digital library using open source software.

Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

2. Evince complex and ethical awareness of major issues, research, trends, and dilemmas in library and information studies.
Objective: students will, within appropriate institutional, organizational, or professional constructs be ready to debate local, national, and global information issues and policies in a cross-disciplinary, analog, or digital context that includes, but is not limited to the responsibility of librarians and information specialists with respect to the free flow of ideas and access to information.

3. Demonstrate critical thinking, analytical capacities, and problem-solving skills.
Objective: students will possess the skills and theoretical knowledge necessary to evaluate and improve library and information systems and services.

6. Show understanding of the knowledge and information organization life cycle including, but not limited to, production, organization, distribution, access, preservation, disposition, and retrieval practices of recorded knowledge and information resources of all kinds.
Objective: students will be able to analyze and synthesize the concepts of knowledge, information, and communication; and to critically examine, assess, and make recommendations as to how these concepts and principles are applied in various information environments, including the Web.

7. Conduct effective searches to locate, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize information sources, with respect for the culturally diverse composition of society and its information needs.
Objective: students will be able to create and manage user-centered  information services and systems to meet the information needs of shifting and distinct communities of users

9. Examine the impact, importance, and limitations of technologies in personal, professional, and social contexts as well as in library and information studies settings.
Objective: students will understand current information technology as an integral part of the operations and services of libraries and information agencies.

Content:

History and definitions of digital libraries, digital library architecture and technology, digitization, preservation, digital repositories, evaluation of digital libraries, user interfaces in digital libraries, information access and retrieval in digital libraries.

Methods:

Lectures, readings, group projects, hands-on exercises, online discussions.

Course relationships: 

Pre-requisites: LIS 501, 502, 503 and 505. 

Required Texts: None

Assignments and Weighting:

Assignment 1: Digital Collection Development                                          (5%)

Assignment 2: Paper on Digital Libraries                                                  (10%)

Assignment 3: Evaluation of an operational digital libraries (Group)         (10%)

Omeka Digital Library Lab                                                                          (5%)

Dublin Core Metadata Generation                                                               (5%)

Omeka Digital Library Project Plan (Group)                                               (5%)

Build an Omeka Digital Library (Group)                                                    (35%)

Online Discussions and Participation                                                          (21%)

Preservation Quiz                                                                                         (4%)

School of Library and Information Studies Grading Statement:

Grades reflect professional judgements of student achievement made by instructors. These judgements are based on a combination of absolute achievement and relative performance in class. The instructor should mark in terms of raw scores, rank the assignments in order of merit, and with due attention to the verbal descriptions of the various grades, assign an appropriate final letter grade.

Academic Integrity:

The University of Alberta is committed to the highest standards of academic integrity and honesty. Students are expected to be familiar with these standards regarding academic honesty and to uphold the policies of the University in this respect. Students are particularly urged to familiarize themselves with the provisions of the Code of Student Behaviour (online at http://www.governance.ualberta.ca/) and avoid any behaviour which could potentially result in suspicions of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of facts and/or participation in an offence. Academic dishonesty is a serious offence and can result in suspension or expulsion from the University.

Inclusive Language and Equity:

The Faculty of Education is committed to providing an environment of respect for all people within the university community and to educating faculty, staff, and students in developing teaching and learning contexts that are welcoming to all. The Faculty recommends that students and staff use inclusive language to create a classroom atmosphere in which students’ experiences and views are treated with equal respect and value in relation to their gender, racial background, sexual orientation and ethnic background. Students who require accommodations in this course due to a disability affecting mobility, vision, hearing, learning, or mental or physical health are advised to discuss their needs with Specialized Support and Disability Services.

SLIS Copyright Policy Statement:

Readings have been uploaded to eClass in accordance with the University of Alberta's "Use of Copyright Materials Policy.”  SLIS faculty, staff and students are reminded that they are bound by the University of Alberta's "Use of Copyright Materials Policy", which requires that the use of copyright materials conforms to the Canadian Copyright Act .Further information and guidance on the use of copyright materials is available from the University of Alberta Copyright Office.