School of Library and Information Studies

Workshops Fall 2009

LIS 598 - ISSUES IN PUBLIC LIBRARY MANAGEMENT

Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of particular interest to those already working in public libraries who aspire to management positions, and to those working in other types of libraries who want to apply for public library positions

DATES OFFERED: September 25 - 27, 2009 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon

INSTRUCTOR: Jeff Barber. Brief Bio - Jeff is the Library Director & CEO of the Regina Public Library. Prior to this, he was a Branch Manager and Acting Director of the Sask. Southeast Regional Library System and Head of Access Services at the University of Saskatchewan. He was a business owner before completing his MLIS and his MBA. He is active in national library communities and is currently Chair of the Canadian Urban [Public] Libraries Council.

COURSE GOAL: To prepare students for positions of responsibility within public libraries

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe some of the traditional responsibilities, values, and roles of public libraries in the 19th and 20th centuries, and compare those to the responsibilities, values, and roles of public libraries in the 21st century
  2. Explain the purpose of public library legislation and its implementation
  3. Describe the governance structures of municipal libraries and the various types of regional libraries in Canada
  4. Describe how library boards work and how librarians can work effectively with those boards
  5. Discuss the roles of labour unions, Friends of the Library, and volunteers within a public library
  6. Describe the management and leadership characteristics that effective public library managers possess
  7. Discuss current issues relevant to public libraries, especially as these issues relate to overall management and policy. Such issues may be: Evidence-based practice, Google Settlement, Economic Impact, Social Inclusion, Community Development, Intellectual Freedom, 8Rs (Report on Library Employment), and Fundraising
  8. Discuss the challenges and advantages of managing a public library within a consortium

LIS 598 INFORMATION SECURITY (CANCELLED)

Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those who want to learn more about the security of customer, collection, and personnel data in all types of information organizations

DATES OFFERED: October 16-18, 2009 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon. Note: October is Information Security Month!

INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Yeo. Brief Bio - Lisa has worked in information security for over 10 years, as a systems administrator for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, and as part of her duties as the SuperNet Project Coordinator with The Alberta Library. She is completing her PhD in Management Science and Management Information Systems in the University of Alberta School of Business with her research focusing on information security in corporations. Lisa is the author of one book, "Personal Firewalls for Administrators and Remote Users" and is co-author on the article "Security and Privacy in Outsourcing with Customer-Specified Risk Tolerance."

COURSE GOALS: To introduce students to the theory and practice of information security – the protection of information and information systems. The course will focus on foundational concepts, assessment and evaluation of information security practices in the library and information studies context.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand and apply the foundational concepts of information security (Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability, and Defense-in-Depth) in a library/information studies context
  2. Discuss and articulate current issues of information security as they apply to information organizations
  3. Select and evaluate security related information technology
  4. Perform basic risk assessment/threat analysis tasks
  5. Respond to information security incidents

LIS 598 CONSUMER HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES

Reading List

AUDIENCE: Of interest to those in all types of libraries, but of particular interest to those in public libraries, where evidence indicates that 10-15% of all reference questions are now consumer health related

DATES OFFERED: October 23 – 25, 2009 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Susan Murray. Brief Bio – Susan has been the Manager of the Toronto Public Library Consumer Health Information Service since 1992 where she set up a province-wide service to provide health-related information to consumers. From 1999 to 2007, she was also the project manager of the Complementary and Alternative Health section of the Canadian Health Network. Susan has been the President of the Canadian Health Libraries Assoc., has offered numerous workshops and courses across Canada on consumer health information, and has written many articles on this issue, the latest being "Consumer health in public libraries in Canada and the U.S." which appeared in the Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association (2008).

COURSE GOALS: As changes in our healthcare system have placed more responsibility for decision-making on the individual, members of the public are with increasing frequency seeking health information in public libraries or the consumer health sections of medical libraries. The goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the resources and services within the consumer health field. Knowledge gained in this course will complement, but not overlap, with knowledge gained in SLIS course LIS 520 – Intro to Health Sciences Librarianship

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the history of the consumer health information field and its relationship to the field of hospital/academic medical information resources and services
  2. Discuss the impact of various social, demographic, and economic factors on the provision of consumer health information
  3. Describe the particular challenges of a health information reference interview with a lay person and the qualities of a well-conducted interview
  4. Discuss the ethical responsibilities and legal implications of providing health information
  5. Discuss the collection management policies and evaluation procedures most suitable for a consumer health collection
  6. Describe key print, electronic, and web-based resources that form the foundation of a consumer health collection, including those in alternative medicine

LIS 598 PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those in all types of information organizations

DATES OFFERED: November 13 – 15, 2009 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Geoff Harder. Brief Bio - Geoff is Digital Initiatives Coordinator at the University of Alberta Libraries where he is the project manager for several large digital library and digitization projects. Geoff is a graduate of the SLIS program and holds a Graduate Certificate in Project Management from the School of Business at the U of A. He has worked on a wide variety of projects for both the library and other organizations.

COURSE GOALS: To provide students with an overview of project management as it relates to projects undertaken in today's libraries, archives and information/IT sectors. This course will provide an introduction to project management theory and practice, with an emphasis on the practical skills required to work successfully within a team-based environment.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the basic phases or stages of project management understanding how each phase impacts the overall project outcome
  2. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of project teams and PM strategies for working effectively to accomplish goals
  3. Discuss the types of projects libraries and information professionals regularly undertake and how project management is used (or misused) in the modern workplace
  4. Plan a project from start to finish, utilizing working knowledge of project planning, execution and post-project assessment