School of Library and Information Studies

Workshops Fall 2015

LIS 598 MAKING AND HACKING AT THE PUBLIC LIBRARY

COURSE OUTLINE

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those in all types of information organizations

DATES OFFERED: October 2-4, 2015 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon. This session will be held at the EPL Makerspace at the Stanley A. Milner library.

INSTRUCTORS: Holly Arnason, Alex Carruthers, Jason Harris, Carla Iacchelli
Holly Arnason is a Digital Literacy Librarian at Edmonton Public Library, and currently provides technical, training, and program support for EPL’s Makerspace. Alex Carruthers is the Digital Public Spaces Librarian at Edmonton Public Library, and is currently a project lead for EPL’s Capital City Records and Open Data initiatives. Jason Harris is the Web Services Librarian at the Edmonton Public Library, where he devotes most of his time to the efficient operation EPL’s public website and staff intranet. Jason holds an MLIS, from Dalhousie University, a B.Ed from the University of Ottawa. Carla Iacchelli, MLIS, is currently the Associate Manager of the Mill Woods branch of Edmonton Public Library. As a Digital Literacy Librarian, she worked in EPL's Digital Literacy Initiatives Department to design and deploy new technology-related services, programming, and staff training, including the EPL Makerspace.

COURSE GOALS: Makerspaces and hackathons are two exciting ways that public libraries are engaging the public with collaborative programs and services designed to help people build digital literacy skills, express creativity, make community connections, and solve problems. Join librarians from Edmonton Public Library’s Digital Literacy Initiatives and Web Services department in this introduction to hacking and making at the public library. Explore the theory and principles behind these initiatives; discuss the practical considerations for successful implementation; and get hands-on practice with maker technologies and hackathons. 

OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

  1. Develop an understanding and overview of the scope, history, and nature of makerspaces and hackathons in libraries.
  2. Understand a broader context of theoretical frameworks, key philosophies, and principles that apply to makerspaces and hackathons in libraries.
  3. Interact with and develop an understanding of common makerspace technologies on site with hands-on activities at the EPL Makerspace.
  4. Develop an understanding and overview of data literacy and open data, working briefly with open data to participate in a mini-hackathon.
  5. Identify and analyze practical considerations for providing maker services, programs, and hackathons in the library (e.g., program design, set up, training, equipment, budget, layout, activities, service models, outcomes, etc.)
                                             

LIS 598 INFORMATION GOVERNANCE KEY CONCEPTS AND ISSUES

COURSE OUTLINE

DATES OFFERED: October 23-25, 2015 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Nicholas Fonseca has close to two decades of experience in business and managing risk.
He manages an information management operation in Alberta and has presented on the subject at conferences and events in Canada and the United States. Nicholas is an immediate past president of ARMA Internathional, Edmonton Chapter, and serves in a governance advisory capacity to the Canadian chapters of ARMA International and on the ARMA Canada governance board. He has contributed as a writer and reviewer for ARMA International standards development projects. Nicholas holds a Bachelors degree in Business and a Masters of Business Administration degree.

COURSE GOALS: Information drives our world and is increasing exponentially, as we accept and embrace technological change. This course will focus on information governance, its subsets, and management of records and information and IG frameworks. A review of business cases will be included with the opportunity for shared exchange of information and ideas.

OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

Understand and explain key concepts of information governance and apply frameworks to assignments and case study situations including:

  • Content management
  • Document management
  • Records management
  • Data privacy
  • IG frameworks
  • Data governance

LIS 598 PROJECT MANAGEMENT

COURSE OUTLINE

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those in all types of information organizations

DATES OFFERED: December 4-6, 2015 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Sonya Betz is Digital Initiatives Projects Librarian at the University of Alberta, where she is responsible for the project management and coordination of a range of digital initiatives, including digital repository services, digitization, research data management, web archiving, and digital preservation. Sonya also spent several years as the Web and User Experience Librarian at MacEwan University, where she led the implementation of a number of digital projects.

COURSE GOALSCreate a new summer reading program; conduct a system-wide collection assessment; launch a new institutional repository. Projects are everywhere in libraries, and librarians often find themselves in the role of accidental project managers for projects of all shapes and sizes. Using established project management strategies can consistently and effectively take a project from an idea to a finished product by helping you define and plan projects, communicate effectively with your team and stakeholders, and track your progress from start to finish.

This course will provide students with an overview of project management as it relates to projects undertaken in today's libraries, archives and information/IT sectors. This course will provide an introduction to project management theory and practice, with an emphasis on the practical skills required to work successfully within a team-based environment.

OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

  1. Discuss the basic phases or stages of project management understanding how each phase impacts the overall project outcome
  2. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of project teams and PM strategies for working effectively to accomplish goals
  3. Discuss the types of projects libraries and information professionals regularly undertake and how project management is used (or misused) in the modern workplace
  4. Plan a project from start to finish, utilizing working knowledge of project planning, execution and post-project assessment