School of Library and Information Studies

Workshops Spring Summer 2010

LIS 598 INFORMATION SECURITY

Course Outline and Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those who want to learn more about the security of customer, collection, and personnel data in all types of information organizations.

DATES OFFERED: May 14, 15, 16, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Yeo. Brief Bio - Lisa has worked in information security for over 10 years, as a systems administrator for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, and as part of her duties as the SuperNet Project Coordinator with The Alberta Library. She is completing her PhD in Management Science and Management Information Systems in the University of Alberta School of Business with her research focusing on information security in corporations. Lisa is the author of one book, Personal Firewalls for Administrators and Remote Users and is co-author on the article "Security and Privacy in Outsourcing with Customer-Specified Risk Tolerance." 

COURSE GOALS: To introduce students to the theory and practice of information security - the protection of information and information systems. The course will focus on foundational concepts, assessment and evaluation of information security practices in the library and information studies context.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand and apply the foundational concepts of information security (Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability, and Defense-in-Depth) in a library/information studies context;
  2. Discuss and articulate current issues of information security as they apply to information organizations;
  3. Select and evaluate security related information technology;
  4. Perform basic risk assessment/threat analysis tasks;
  5. Respond to information security incidents.

LIS 598 ABORIGINAL LIBRARIANSHIP, RESOURCES AND SERVICES

Course Outline and Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to those who want to learn more about Aboriginal documentary heritage, some sound practices in serving all Canadians on this topic and the unique benefits and challenges in the field.

DATES OFFERED: May 28, 29, 30, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Deborah Pelletier, Manager of Aboriginal Heritage Initiatives, Library & Archives Canada, Ottawa. Deborah has done extensive research and work in the area of Aboriginal resources and services in public service organizations including, libraries, archives, schools and educational institutions. She has assisted in defining and communicating the priorities and needs of Aboriginal communities; collaborated on policy development; and co-authored a number of informational and educational resources.

COURSE GOALS: To provide students with an introduction to available Aboriginal information resources and services;
To discuss the benefits and unique challenges for librarians and other information specialists in providing information and services to all Canadians on this topic.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify client and information needs of Aboriginal peoples;
  2. Describe and illustrate relevant types of Aboriginal information resources, services, programming, activities or projects that may be used in libraries or information centers;
  3. Discuss the challenges and responsibilities of libraries creating and maintaining an inclusive environment within the broader context of library development;
  4. Develop approaches toward engaging, collaborating or partnering with Aboriginal peoples or organizations in the development of literacy and outreach initiatives;
  5. Discuss the challenges and responsibilities of libraries in recruitment and retention of Aboriginal peoples and in developing the competencies of non-Aboriginal peoples to work in this area.

CANCELLED LIS 598 EMERGENT LITERACY

Course Outline and Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to library staff who develop collections and programs for young children and families in public libraries.

DATES OFFERED: June 18, 19, 20, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Allison Taylor McBryde is Coordinator of Children's and Young Adult Services, North Vancouver District Public Library and has been a children's librarian for over thirty years. She has been an Adjunct Professor at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies of the University of British Columbia where she has taught a variety of courses from Early Literacy, to Children's Services to Contemporary Children's Literature over the past twenty years.

COURSE GOALS: This course will provide an introduction to early (or emergent) literacy research and how it can be used to enhance library services for children from birth to age five, their parents and care-givers. Research will focus on language development and how we can apply that research in designing developmentally appropriate programming. The course will examine the critical role of parents and the supportive role of family, care-givers and librarians in developing early literacy (or pre-reading) skills.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Have an awareness of the wealth of research and resources available on children’s language development and emergent literacy;
  2. Be aware of current trends in emergent literacy or family literacy programming and be familiar with the variety of services for children and parents that public libraries can and do provide to augment early learning;
  3. Understand the critical importance and role of the parent and care-givers in early learning;
  4. Be able to apply the research to developmentally appropriate programming through the acquisition and evaluation of new rhymes, songs, and stories.