School of Library and Information Studies

Workshops Winter 2010

LIS 598 GENEALOGY RESOURCES & SERVICES

Reading List

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of particular interest to those working in public libraries or archives

DATES OFFERED: January 22-24, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Pat McNamee. Brief Bio – Pat is a SLIS graduate who for many years has been a consultant at the Alberta Public Library Services Branch. She has offered workshops throughout Alberta on genealogical resources and searching, and to research her own family history has travelled extensively in Europe

COURSE GOAL: To familiarize students with the genealogical resources and services: the focus will be on serving genealogists in libraries, but archival work will also be included.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the basic characteristics and elements of genealogy and heraldry
  2. Discuss the various purposes of genealogical research
  3. Describe the key reference tools used in genealogical research and demonstrate proficiency in using those tools
  4. Describe the collection management issues associated with genealogical resources and services
  5. Discuss the special elements key to a successful reference interview with a genealogist
  6. Describe special programs of interest to genealogists that could be offered by a library or archives

LIS 598 INFORMATION RESOURCES & SERVICES FOR MEDIA ORGANIZATIONS

 

AUDIENCE: Of interest to anyone who wonders what it would be like to work as an information specialist in a radio or television station, or for a newspaper, as well as in online media environments

DATES OFFERED: February 5-7, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTORS: Monica Chattaway (principal instructor) Music Librarian, & Michael Betmanis, Library Technician, at CKUA Radio Network. Guest speakers from different media libraries will also participate. Brief Bio - Monica Chattaway is presently involved in setting up the new Digital Music Library at CKUA that is going to be the first of its kind in Canada. Previously she has worked at the Vancouver Public Library in almost all its divisions and branches, and has also worked at the B.C. Indian Chief’s Library on an audio tape preservation project. Monica first became interested in media information services when she did her practicum at the Edmonton Sun library.

COURSE GOALS: To provide students with an introduction to the various information resources and services provided within a media organization such as a radio station, newspaper, magazine, or television company.

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the historical development of media libraries
  2. Describe the elements of news delivery in the various types of media organizations that impact on service hours, collection development, reference service, and resource organization, retrieval, and retention
  3. Describe the collection management issues relevant to the information resources common to media libraries (e.g. sound bites, video clips, photographs, electronic text).
  4. Describe the importance and methods of marketing the information centre within the media organization
  5. Describe the latest innovations in news content delivery and archiving, and the impact of those innovations on the information centre
  6. Discuss policies, procedures, and copyright issues related to managing content re-sales and serving clients who are outside the organization.

LIS 598 GOVERNMENT INFORMATION: LOCAL, PROVINCIAL, & FEDERAL

Reading List

AUDIENCE: Of interest to those working in all types of libraries and other information organizations

DATES OFFERED: March 5-7, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTORS: Heather Close, Sharna Polard, Yvonne Footz, and Val Footz.. Brief Bios: Heather Close is the Reference and Research Services Coordinator at the Alberta Legislature Library. With the Library since 2001, she has assumed many roles there, including Serials Librarian, Acting Government Documents Librarian and Committee Research Librarian. She has worked in various capacities at public, school and academic libraries. Sharna Polard is the Government Document Librarian at the Alberta Legislature Library. Sharna has over 20 years experience in the library field in a variety of different types of libraries and has been working as a government documents librarian since 2002. She is responsible for all government documents collections at the Legislature Library, including the Alberta Electronic Government Documents Collection. Yvonne Footz was Edmonton Public Library's Government Information Librarian from 1995-2009. She has presented gov’t information related sessions at Netspeed and the Alberta Library Conference, was a member of the Canadian Depository Services Program Library Advisory Committee, and has previously co-taught SLIS gov’t document courses with her sister Val. Val Footz is Manager, Library Operations, at the Legislature Library. She has been with the Legislature Library since 2001 and previously worked at the Legal Resources Centre and ACJNet. She was a member of the Retention Guidelines Subcommittee (Canadian Depository Services Program Library Advisory Committee) and has taught legal research to first year law students at the University of Alberta.

COURSE GOAL: To introduce students to the reference services, collection management, and classification involved with local, provincial, & federal government information

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe the types and formats of government information published by the three levels of gov’t
  2. Identify the challenges of reference work with, collection management of and classification of local, provincial, and federal Canadian gov’t information and the methods used to address those challenges

LIS 598 INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENT & AGENCY INFORMATION

Reading List

AUDIENCE: Of interest to those working in all types of libraries, and to those who would like to know more about working in libraries outside of Canada

DATES OFFERED: March 19-21, 2010 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -12 noon.

INSTRUCTOR: Jane Wu. Brief Bio: Jane is a SLIS graduate who has worked as a library manager at [National] Library and Archives Canada and at the national Canadian Agricultural Library. From 1993 to 2008, she was Chief Librarian of the FAO United Nations Library in Rome. She co-edited a book published by IFLA titled Best Practices in Government Information (2008), and in 2009, she carried out a strategic planning project with an international organization in Penang, Malaysia.

COURSE GOALS: To introduce students to reference services, collection management, and classification involved with international government and international agency information, and to the human rights issues involved with access to this information

OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe various aspects, similarities, and differences in gov’t information published by selected countries other than Canada
  2. Identify the challenges of reference work with, collection management of and classification of international government and agency information and the methods used to address those challenges
  3. Discuss the barriers to equitable access to gov’t and international agency information in selected countries, and the political and human rights elements associated with those barriers