School of Library and Information Studies

Workshops Winter 2016

LIS 598 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW SEARCHING

COURSE OUTLINE

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to health librarians and librarians interested in systematic reviews.

DATES OFFERED: January 29-31, 2016 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m. in Room 3-01 Rutherford South; Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. in Lab WMC 2F-102;
Sunday 9 a.m. - 12 noon in Lab WMC 2F-102.

INSTRUCTORS: Sandy Campbell and Thane Chambers
Sandy Campbell is liaison librarian to the School of Public Health and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the Univeristy of Alberta.  Sandy has co-authored numerous systematic reviews and has co-taught a Introduction to Systematic Review Searching workshop monthly since 2013.
Thane Chambers is liaison librarian to the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Alberta. Thane has co-authored and worked with many students and researchers on scoping, systematic, meta-analyses, and realist, and Cochrane reviews.

COURSE GOALS: The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the systematic review search process and to develop the skills necessary to execute the high level of searching required as part of the systematic review methodology.

OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Distinguish a systematic review from other types of reviews
  2. Describe the importance of systematic reviews/meta-analyses for clinical decision-making
  3. Describe the process of designing and executing a systematic search
  4. Describe the role of the librarian on a systematic review team
  5. Describe the components of a search protocol for a systematic review
  6. Create and execute a comprehensive search strategy suitable for a systematic review/meta-analysis.
  7. Be familiar with PRESS as a tool for peer-reviewing search strategies.
  

LIS 598 ACCESS TO JUSTICE:
LEGAL INFORMATION RESOURCES AND SERVICES

COURSE OUTLINE

AUDIENCE:

DATES OFFERED: March 4-6, 2016 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sunday 9 a.m. - 12 noon. Room 3-01 Rutherford South

INSTRUCTOR: Amelia Martin

COURSE GOALS: This course will provide an introduction (theoretical and practical) to both traditional and alternative legal information resources and services that can be used by library and information professionals to support a wide variety of audiences including legal professionals in both public and private sectors, law school faculty and students, self-represented litigants, and members of the general public. Students will learn how to increase access to justice through empowering people with reliable, accurate legal information no matter what the setting or resources available.

OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

  1. Have a general understanding of the Canadian legal system and how it impacts legal information services
  2. Be familiar legal research methods and reference tools used in the provision of legal information services to a variety of audiences including legal professionals, law school faculty and students, self-represented litigants, and members of the general public
  3. Have an introductory understanding of primary and secondary Canadian legal resources, both print and electronic
  4. Be aware of the challenges and responsibilities of information professionals who provide legal information services
  5. Be more confident in their ability to answer basic legal information reference questions related to Canadian law
  6. Have an introductory understanding of trends impacting legal resources and the provision of legal information services in Canada

LIS 598 INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT INFORMATION

COURSE OUTLINE

AUDIENCE: This workshop will be of interest to anyone planning to work with non-fiction services and collections.

DATES OFFERED: March 18-20, 2016 (13 hours) Friday 6-9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sunday 9 a.m. - 12 noon. room 3-01 Rutherford South

INSTRUCTOR: Amanda Wakaruk
Amanda Wakaruk (MLIS, MES) is the Copyright Librarian at the University of Alberta. Amanda’s 17 year career working with government information included positions of employment in public, special, and academic libraries. She also served on numerous association committees and was the founding chair of the award-winning Canadian Government Information Digital Preservation Network. More information about Amanda can be found at: https://sites.google.com/a/ualberta.ca/wakaruk/

COURSE GOALS: The Introduction to Government Information course is designed to provide students with an overview of government publishers and the dissemination and use of their materials in a library context. By the end of this course students are expected to have developed an introductory understanding of government information, its role in a liberal democracy, and practical considerations related to its acquisition, access, and stewardship.

OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, students will:

  1. Have an introductory understanding of the role of government publishers
  2. Be aware of the socio-political context within which government information is produced and disseminated
  3. Have an introductory understanding of legal and policy resources produced by Canadian federal branches of government as part of the democratic process
  4. Be more confident in their ability to answer government information reference questions related to policy and statistics
  5. Be familiar with the challenges and opportunities related to the acquisition, use, and stewardship of government information.