Courses

  • CHRTC 100 The Bible: An Introduction

    A study of the basic themes of the Christian Bible; creation and covenant; sin and evil; the biblical history of ancient Israel; the prophets and justice; the preaching, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ; redemption; the emergence of the Church.

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  • CHRTC 101 Catholicism: An Introduction
  • CHRTC 103 Introduction to the Roads of Happiness

    Great minds have long attempted to define the all-important human experience of happiness. But what does happiness mean? What are the mysteries of happiness? Is it possible to acquire more of it? This course examines various perspectives on happiness - psychological, philosophical, social, relational, theological and spiritual - and offers tools that can help cultivate happiness amidst the twists and turns of life's pilgrimage.

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  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: A Comparative Study of the Bible and the Quran

    The Hebrew Bible contains the history of kings, prophets, and people of Israel, also some chapters devoted to religious law. The New Testament contains the Gospels which depict the life of Jesus, and letters regarding Christian belief. In the Quran, various topics are scattered within different chapters. However, there are numerous allusions in the New Testament to the Hebrew Bible, and in the Quran to both. Notable similarities as well as differences are found in these three scriptures. A comparative study is fruitful for obtaining a better understanding of the Abrahamic faith and the relation between the approaches of the three religions on certain topics.

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  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: Christian Scriptures in the Holy Land

    Are you interested in learning more about the New Testament while experiencing the geographical, historical, cultural and religious context in which many New Testament events took place? Would you like to see the places where Jesus and his apostles lived, hand in hand with an introduction to the gospels, epistles and other New Testament books? If so, CHRTC 203 may be just what you’re looking for.

    Come join us in Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus Christ, for a three-week course looking at the historical and literary background to the New Testament, with daily classes supplemented by weekend excursions to the Judean Desert, Galilee and Jerusalem. Possible topics to be discussed include the New Testament Canon; New Testament manuscripts; the Jewish and Greco-Roman worlds that shaped the New Testament; the literary genres of gospel and epistle; the relationship between the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) and the gospel of John; the Historical Jesus; the Book of Acts; and the Apostle Paul.

    Additionally, key passages related to places visited during the course will be studied and discussed, with a view to learning and applying what is known as the Historical Critical Method of approaching the Bible. The course will be heavily oriented towards classroom discussion, so students should come prepared to participate actively and to reflect on both what they learn in class and experience while living in a culture very different from what they may be used to in Canada, but in many ways very similar to that in which Jesus and his early followers lived.

    Each weekday morning will be spent in class; afternoons will be for course work and travel to local sites. Weekends will include travel to the Judean Desert, Nazareth, Tiberias, Galilee, and Jerusalem.

    SJC has received a University of Alberta Education Abroad Group Award! This means that students enrolled in a UofA degree program will receive funds to reduce their travel costs!

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  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: Christianity in China

    A historical survey of Christianity in China from the first verifiable contacts with the “Nestorian” Church of the East in the 7th century to the modern day status of Christianity in China and amongst the Chinese diaspora. Meet Alopen, Rabban Sauma, John of Montecorvino, Matteo Ricci, Hudson Taylor, Brother Yun and other significant individuals who have contributed to Chinese Christianity.

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  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: Fantasy Worlds and Christian Spirituality

    This course aims to bring the student to a greater appreciation of fantasy literature and film as a medium for the way the human person, the community, and the divine are interpreted and their role within our society, faith, and Church. Specifically, we will look at Harry Potter and Star Wars as two of the most popular fantasy works in several decades. We will explore them through the lenses of the literary hero, a spiritual journey, and growing in spirituality and Christian faith.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: Global Christianity: Sociological Perspectives
    Examination of Global Christianity past and present from a sociological perspective. Appraisal of Christian Churches in different global regions (The West, Eastern Europe, China and East Asia, Latin America and Africa).

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  • CHRTC 203 Topics in Catholic Tradition: Harry Potter and Christian Spirituality

    This course aims to bring the student to a greater appreciation of literature and film as a medium for the way the human person, the community, and the divine are interpreted and their role within our society, faith, and Church. Specifically, we will look at Harry Potter, the most popular fantasy work in several decades. We will explore the films and refer to the novels through literary, scriptural story, the hero’s journey and spiritual themes of Christian faith.

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  • CHRTC 220 Sport and Religion

    This course will investigate the interaction between sport and religion in western societies primarily from a Christian perspective. Students will explore content and methods which overlap in sport and religion, such as: transcendence, body/spirit unity, virtue and character development, gamesmanship vs sportsmanship, competition, violence, and play.
    Students will examine levels of engagement in sport and their interrelationship with spirituality and religion.

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  • CHRTC 221 Interactions Between Indigenous Spiritual Traditions and Christianity

    This course will explore cross-cultural issues focusing on Aboriginal spiritual traditions and Christianity in Canada. Topics will include truth and reconciliation, healing, syncretism, worship, and ministry. Students will be challenged with a spectrum of voices, perspectives, and experiences.

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  • CHRTC 241 Catholicism and Popular Culture

    The relationship between Catholicism and popular culture using both historical and contemporary examples. Use by Catholics of such popular media as print, film, video, TV, music and the internet; Catholic assessments of consumer culture and the mass media. Not to be taken by students with credit in CHRTC 392.

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  • CHRTC 242 The Writings of C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis continues to hold remarkable appeal to a broad readership. His corpus of writings is wide-ranging, encompassing fantasy literature like the Chronicles of Narnia, to popular articulations of faith, such as Mere Christianity. This course seeks to explore the thought world of C.S. Lewis and critically evaluate the trajectory of his thought as well as the popular reception of his works.

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  • CHRTC 250 The Theological Education of the Catholic Teacher

    The components that make up the education of the Catholic teacher. Issues include credal statements, the moral and social teachings of the Church, liturgical practices, a general theology and theory of Catholic education.

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  • CHRTC 264 Dimensions of the Christian Faith

    What is Christianity? An introduction to the major dimensions of Christianity, such as revelation, faith, Scripture, God, Jesus as Lord and Saviour, with reflection on them in light of contemporary human experience.

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  • CHRTC 266 Jesus in the New Testament

    An examination of the historical Jesus and Christology through a study of the four Gospels, Paul, and later New Testament writers.

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  • CHRTC 267 The New Testament Letters: An Introduction

    A theological and scriptural exploration of the central themes of the New Testament letters and their contemporary relevance.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • CHRTC 272 Catholic Moral Thought: An Introduction

    Major themes in Catholic moral reflection with application to contemporary issues. The meaning of morality and Christian conversion; the role of experience, the Bible, the Church, moral norms, the development of conscience, and personal responsibility.

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  • CHRTC 292 Spirituality for Today's Christians

    Developing an understanding of the role of prayer, leisure, and work within a Christian lifestyle in the light of Scripture, Christian tradition, current theological reflection, and personal differences.

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  • CHRTC 303 Well-Being and Resilience: Christian Perspectives
  • CHRTC 309 Topics in Christian Tradition: Sport and Lived Faith

    This practical theology course examines sport through engagement with Christian teachings and practices, along with spirituality, sport psychology, and biography. An emerging framework will enable students' critical reflection on past and current sporting experiences and will facilitate student-led qualitative research with players and coaches in sport today..

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    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • CHRTC 309 Topics in Christian Tradition: Star Wars, the Hunger Games & The Bible

    This course considers select Biblical themes in relation to the science-fiction fantasy works of The Hunger Games and Star Wars. The dystopian future of The Hunger Games and arcane universe of Star Wars offer glimpses of imaginative possibility and contemporary theological reflection. These popular works also provide overlap with various themes developed in biblical literature such as faith, trust, freedom, self-sacrifice, and hope. Utilizing these themes as an interpretive lens, we will explore their significance for the characters and worlds of within the texts as well as their relevance for readers today.

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  • CHRTC 309 Topics in the Christian Tradition: Christianity beyond Byzantium

    An exploration of Christianity in the Middle East and Asia, with a focus on the churches of Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, and Armenia, from apostolic times to the present. Come and learn about Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Syriac and other Christians who have spent much of their history outside the world of European Christianity.

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  • CHRTC 309 Topics in the Christian Tradition: Minority Religions in the Middle East

    A survey of the minority religions of the contemporary Middle East, with a focus on their beliefs and practices, historical development and current socio-political situation, including historical relationships with Islam. Learn about the main attributes, historical contributions and contemporary challenges faced by Jews, Samaritans, Christians, Zoroastrians, Mandaeans, Yezidis, Druze and other religious minorities in the Middle East.

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  • CHRTC 309 Topics in the Christian Tradition: Religion and Spirituality Among Millennials

    Exploration of millennials’ relationship to religious belief and spirituality through a sociological lens. The course examines the impacts of social and family structure, cultural movements, technological changes and changing patterns of belief.

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  • CHRTC 339 International Service Learning: Colombia

    Supervised work experience in approved Christian Social agencies with seminars and assignments integrating the theological literature with issues raised by social action and placement experiences. Students will be required to travel to Colombia over Fall Break and must have Department approval prior to registration. 

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  • CHRTC 339 International Service Learning: Guatemala

    Supervised work experience in approved Christian Social agencies with seminars and assignments integrating the theological literature with issues raised by social action and placement experiences. Students will be required to travel to Guatemala over Reading Week and must have Department approval prior to registration.

    This course counts towards Community Service Learning credit.

    Enrol by contacting the SJC Academic Program Coordinator 

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  • CHRTC 341 Contemporary Film and Christian Values

    Theological themes arising out of contemporary film. Themes may include relationships, family, gender, possessions, work freedom, violence, suffering, death, happiness, and hope.

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  • CHRTC 342 Tolkien: The Theology of Middle Earth

    The enigmatic and obscure Oxford philologist, J.R.R. Tolkien, produced a corpus of writings on the world of Middle Earth that has captivated countless readers. The cinematic renderings of the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit have further popularized his works, yet readers and viewers alike are often surprised at the profound impression Tolkien's Catholic faith has made upon his writings. This course seeks to critically appreciate the artistic vocation and theological vision of J.R.R. Tolkien while exploring a major work of 20th century literature.

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  • CHRTC 347 / HIST 300 World War II and Christians

    World War II is often seen as a great battle between good and evil. This course investigates Christian responses to this conflict through the actions, experiences and thoughts of individuals and churches. Topics include: Pope Pius XII—was he “Hitler’s pope” or a saint; the atheist Stalin’s use of Orthodoxy to rally Russians; theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s plot to assassinate Hitler; Christian responses to the Holocaust; Christian pacifists; and Christian collaborators.

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  • CHRTC 348 / HIST 360 A History of Christianity in Canada

    An historical study of Christianity in Canada from contact until the present. Topics include: the church in New France; Jesuit and Oblate missions; missions to Native Canadians and residential schools; the development of confessional schools; the Ukrainian Catholic community; the Quiet Revolution in Quebec. Students can research their own projects in archives in the Edmonton area.

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  • CHRTC 349 Social Justice and Christianity

    An examination of particular social justice issues related to the economy, women, native peoples, the environment, etc., in light of Catholic social teachings and other Christian perspectives; social action strategies, and education for social justice.

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  • CHRTC 350 Science and Religion: Christian Perspectives

    An examination of relationships between science and religion. Topics may include Galileo affair, geology and Noah's flood, Darwin's religious beliefs, evolution vs creation debate, intelligent design, natural evil, interpretations of Genesis 1-11.

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  • CHRTC 351 Sex, Love and Marriage: Christian Perspectives

    Questions of meaning and morality concerning sex, love, marriage, non-marital sex, parenthood, relationship and marriage breakup, celibacy, gender, and homosexuality, considered in the light of experience, the Bible, Catholic teaching, traditional and contemporary theological discussion.

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  • CHRTC 352 Bioethical Issues Christian Perspectives

    Reproductive and genetic technologies, abortion, transplantation, resource allocation, research, withdrawing treatment, personal directives, euthanasia, considered in light of human experience. Catholic Church teaching, other Christian perspectives and contemporary ethical discussion. This course counts towards Community Service Learning credit.

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  • CHRTC 354 The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke

    An examination of the historical and theological accounts of Jesus in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

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  • CHRTC 355 The Catechism of the Catholic Church: Theological Perspectives
  • CHRTC 361 Death, Dying and Culture

    This course considers facets of death and dying as they manifest in the Christian tradition and contemporary culture. Topics may include: faith and death, ritual, spiritual practices, caring for the dying, allowing to die, assisting in death, medical perceptions of death, social responses to death/dying, grief and mourning.

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  • CHRTC 372 The Theology and Spirituality of Eastern Christianity

    The churches of the Christian East, the Patristic era and early ecumenical councils, the schism between East and West, and contemporary Greek Catholic and Orthodox Churches with special attention to the churches in Canada.

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  • CHRTC 380 Teaching Religion: Elementary

    An introduction to Christian religious education for elementary schools with an emphasis on pedagogy, child development and the religious education curriculum. Some sections of this course count towards Community Service Learning credit.

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  • CHRTC 381 Teaching Religion Secondary

    An introduction to Christian religious education for secondary schools with an emphasis on pedagogy, adolescent and young adult development and the religious education curriculum. This course is structured to support aspiring secondary teachers to develop an elective religious education program. Some sections of this course count towards Community Service Learning credit.

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  • CHRTC 390 Neuroscience, the Person and Christian Theology
  • CHRTC 391 Women's Spirituality in Contemporary Christianity

    This course explores women’s experiences of God and the Christian life, as experienced in the history of spirituality, personal faith development, and contemporary culture. We will examine what particular women have done in Christian history in the light of their own historical circumstances and consider how contemporary Christian women are living and teaching their Christian spirituality. Over the course of the term, participants are invited to reflect on their own spiritualities in relation to women in Christian history and culture, and to their own cultural and faith experiences.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • CHRTC 396 Environmental Issues: Christian Perspectives

    Theological and ethical issues concerning our relationship to the planet earth: responsible stewardship, non-renewable resources, pollution, the use of technology.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • CHRTC 407 Topics in Christian Religious Education
  • CHRTC 430 The Human Sexual Body: Christian Perspectives
  • CHRTC 449 Field Placement in Christian Service
  • CHRTC 450 Directed Readings in Catholic Theology
  • CHRTC 450 Directed Readings in Catholic Theology: Theology & Evolutionary Psychology
  • CHRTC 501 Directed Reading in Catholic Theology
  • CHRTC 609 Topics in Christian Tradition
  • PHIL 209 The Human Person: Philosophical Issues

    Personal identity, interpersonal relationships, sex and gender, freedom, and immortality in historical and contemporary contexts.

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  • PHIL 239 Greek Philosophy and the Christian Tradition
  • PHIL 249 Medieval Philosophy and the Christian Tradition

    A survey of philosophy from the 5th to the 15th centuries; Philosophers from the Jewish, Islamic and Christian traditions.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • PHIL 279 Philosophy of Hunting

    Older than humanity’s ‘oldest profession,’ hunting is a philosophically weighty practice that contemporary societies increasingly struggle to understand. This course critically examines the ethical, experiential, conceptual, environmental and socio-political status of hunting, including topics such as animal rights, fair chase, environmentalism, subsistence vs. trophy hunting, human nature, predation, death, gender, race, religion and class.

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  • PHIL 309 Augustine

    Philosophical issues in Augustine: their historical context, significance, and influence. The class will study the life and work of Augustine of Hippo (354-430), an incredibly prolific and profoundly influential thinker in the Western world. Exploration of his life and times, The Confessions, and select writings will help unravel the thought-world and perspectives of Augustine. Prerequisite: At least 3 credits in PHIL or consent of the College.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • PHIL 319 Thomas Aquinas
  • PHIL 339 World Views and Christianity

    Critical study of Christianity in dialogue with such worldviews as atheism, agnosticism, naturalism, materialism, existentialism, feminism, liberalism, postmodernism.

    This course is not offered during the 2018-2019 academic year.

  • PHIL 359 Topics in Christian Philosophy: Faith and Reason in Christianity and Islam
    What has Athens to do with Jerusalem? Does reason lead one in understanding one’s religious belief set? Or does faith delimit the way reason works? What is the
    relation between reason and faith? Investigating the fascinating story of the periods of upheaval and stability in the interaction between faith and reason is quite fruitful in understanding various aspects of the intellectual development of the Islamic and the Western civilizations; it is also informative for the analysis of many contemporary social, political, and religious issues. On top of that, the relation between faith and reason, in the form of debate between religion and science, is an important topic in the contemporary philosophy of religion as well as in theology.

     

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  • PHIL 359 Topics in Christian Philosophy: Philosophy and Theology after the Holocaust

    Is philosophy and theology possible after the Holocaust? That is, can thought and faith do justice to this event and its victims? By carefully studying and engaging with texts by the Jewish philosopher Emil Fackenheim, and most notably with his magnum opus To Mend the World, this course will at once provide an introduction to foundational issues of contemporary continental philosophy while exposing us to the demand of the Holocaust in order to think through the possibility of philosophical, political and inter-faith dialogue in the face of postmodern fragmentation.

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  • PHIL 399 Religious Existentialism