Women's and Gender Studies

Current Course Offerings

Click the '+' to see the course description and other details.
* denotes a Special Topics course. 

Winter Term 2017 (1580)

Undergraduate Courses

  • WGS 102: Gender and Social Justice

    Examines social and cultural constructions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and disability as well as visions for social justice.

    Instructor: NIELSEN, Emilia
    Days & Time: M/W, 11:00 - 12:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

  • WGS 220: Feminism and Popular Culture

    This course examines selected cultural forms in Canadian and American society from feminist perspectives. The focus is both on developing a feminist critique of cultural representations of women, and on considering the possibilities of feminist intervention in and production of popular culture.

    Instructor: HUTCHINSON, Kristen
    Days & Time: T/TH, 9:30 - 11:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none
    Note: Not open to students with credit in WGS 320 (or W ST 320)

  • WGS 244: Disability Studies

    Interrogation of the medical model of disability through cultural disability studies, including feminist and queer perspectives. Introduces students to social issues in disability studies, social policy, and social justice.

    Instructor: NIELSEN, Emilia
    Days & Time: M/W/F, 13:00 - 14:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

  • WGS 260: Women and War

    Introduction to how women experience political conflicts, either in contemporary or historical contexts, focusing on how violence, access to resources, public decision-making, and social security impact women during and after conflict.

    Instructor: OKEKE-IHEJIRIKA, Philomina
    Days & Time: T/TH, 11:00 - 12:30
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

  • * WGS 298: Critical Issues - Fat

    Like women's and gender studies, fat studies emerged from a background of activism that takes the lived experiences of its subjects as politically salient. This course introduces students to the perspectives that have shaped the scholarly literature in fat studies, specifically those that explain stigmas attached to fat bodies and how that intersects with race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality. This course asks students to critically reflect on how thinking about fatness as an identity marker and unique experience enhances the language and logic of women's and gender studies classrooms and scholarship.

    Instructor: RODIER, Kristin
    Days & Time: T, 17:00 - 20:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

  • WGS 302: Feminist Research and Methodologies

    Whether there can be and is a distinctive feminist perspective on research in various disciplines; the ways in which taking a feminist perspective or taking account of women in research, affects the research process.

    Instructor: BELL, Mebbie
    Days & Time: T/TH, 15:30 - 17:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent

  • WGS 332: Contemporary Feminist Theory

    The origins and evolution of various schools of contemporary western feminist thought.

    Instructor: NIXON, Randi
    Days & Time:
    M/W/F, 11:00 - 12:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note: Not open to students with credit in PHIL 332

  • WGS 390: Ecofeminism

     Feminist approaches to environmental ethics and politics.

    Instructor: TAYLOR, Chloë
    Days & Time: M, 17:00 - 20:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent

  • WGS 455: Feminism and Religion

    Ways in which women and pro-feminist men have constructed religious ideologies that are supportive of women’s power and agency.

    Instructor: LIFSHITZ, Felice
    Days & Time: M, 14:00 - 17:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note:  Taught in conjunction with GSJ 555 (SEM B1)

  • * WGS 470: Sexualities - Writing Queer Feelings

    In this special topics course, the focus is on the theoretical intersections of queer and affect theories with a particular focus on writing in the genre creative nonfiction. As such, we will explore examples of autotheory, autobiography, biomythography, personal essay, graphic novel and memoir. As we progress through the course materials, we will be asking theoretical questions of each piece of writing and we will also be asking questions of affect and queerness: Where is the feeling located in this piece? What makes the piece queer? Why do we care? Why should we care? Because the focus of this upper level course is on writing queer feelings, I will be asking each of you to put theory into praxis by asking you to write in the genre of creative nonfiction. I will supply a series of writing prompts to get you started as well as facilitate idea generation by asking you to also do a series of free-writing in class. Your final assignment will be a piece of writing written in the genre of creative nonfiction and you will have a chance to share part of it aloud on the final day of class. The authors of the full length texts that we read and discuss, in addition to the shorter theoretical readings, are by Alison Bechdel, Audre Lorde, Maggie Nelson, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha and Gregory Scofield.

    Instructor: NIELSEN, Emilia
    Days & Time: F, 14:00 - 17:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite:
    Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note: May be repeated for credit 

  • * WGS 498 (B3): Special Topics in Women's & Gender Studies - Anthropocene Feminism

    Geologists increasingly concur that the “now” we live in—and hence the “now” in which feminists must theorize—is a new geological epoch that they are naming the “Anthropocene.” This is a period marked, first and foremost, by anthropogenic environmental change. Feminist approaches to the Anthropocene draw upon multiple social justice frameworks to discern how capitalism, patriarchy, and colonialism have driven anthropogenic transformation, while striving for a new appreciation of scale, temporality, and impact on nonhuman beings and ecosystems. This course will examine the ways that feminists are engaging with the Anthropocene.

    Instructor: TAYLOR, Chloë
    Days & Time:
    W, 14:00 - 17:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note: Taught in conjunction with GSJ 507 (SEM B1)

  • * WGS 498 (B4): Special Topics in Women's & Gender Studies - Gendering Development

    Examines the intersection of gender and the developmental process with particular emphasis on feminist discourses of development history, theory and practice.

     

    Instructor: OKEKE-IHEJIRIKA, Philomina
    Days & Time:
    T/TH, 14:00 – 15:30
    Units:
    *3.00
    Prerequisite: 
    Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note: Taught in conjunction with GSJ 505 (SEM B1)

Graduate Courses

  • GSJ 502: Research Workshop

    In addition to attendance at the Feminist Research Speakers Series, students will examine interdisciplinary approaches to feminist scholarship, and prepare and develop their thesis or research project proposals.

     

    Instructor: LUHMANN, Susanne
    Days & Time: W, 11:00 - 14:00
    Units: *3.00

  • GSJ 505: Gendering Development

    Examines the intersection of gender and the developmental process with particular emphasis on feminist discourses of development history, theory and practice.

     

    Instructor: OKEKE-IHEJIRIKA, Philomina
    Days & Time:
    T/TH, 14:00 – 15:30
    Units:
    *3.00
    Note:
    Taught in conjunction with WGS 498 (SEM B4)

  • * GSJ 507: Feminist Theory Now - Anthropocene Feminism

    Geologists increasingly concur that the “now” we live in—and hence the “now” in which feminists must theorize—is a new geological epoch that they are naming the “Anthropocene.” This is a period marked, first and foremost, by anthropogenic environmental change. Feminist approaches to the Anthropocene draw upon multiple social justice frameworks to discern how capitalism, patriarchy, and colonialism have driven anthropogenic transformation, while striving for a new appreciation of scale, temporality, and impact on nonhuman beings and ecosystems. This course will examine the ways that feminists are engaging with the Anthropocene.

    Instructor: TAYLOR, Chloë
    Days & Time:
    W, 14:00 - 17:00
    Units: *3.00
    Note: Taught in conjunction with WGS 498 (SEM B3)

  • GSJ 555: Feminism and Religion

    Ways in which women and pro-feminist men have constructed religious ideologies that are supportive of women’s power and agency.

     

    Instructor: LIFSHITZ, Felice
    Days & Time:
    M, 14:00 – 17:00
    Units:
    *3.00
    Note:
    Taught in conjunction with WGS 455 (LEC B1)


Spring Term 2017 (1590)

  • WGS 102: Gender and Social Justice

    Examines social and cultural constructions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and disability as well as visions for social justice.

    Instructor: NIELSEN, Emilia
    Days & Time: T/R, 13:30 - 16:30
    Classroom: ED 113
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

  • WGS 270: Feminism and Sexualities

    Approaches to, and key debates about, sexuality. Topics may include: sexology; critiques of heterosexuality; political lesbianism; queer theory; transgender and intersexuality; prostitution and sex work.

    Instructor: NIELSEN, Emilia
    Days & Time: M/W, 15:00 - 18:00
    Classroom: CAB 373
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none
    Note:  Not open students with credit in WGS 370 (or W ST 370)

  • * WGS 298: Critical Issues - Race and Gender in Comics

     

    How do texts, drawings, and frames develop representation of race and gender in comics? This course will survey contemporary representations of gendered and racialized bodies through text, drawings, and frames in comics, graphic memoirs and novels, and more. This survey course will be global in scope and our discussions will be directed toward narratives and counter-narratives of race and gender.

    Instructor: WOODMAN, Dorothy
    Days & Time: M/W, 18:00 - 21:00
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite: none

     

    Click here to see the full course poster (PDF)!


Summer 2017 (1600)

  • WGS 240: Feminism and Food

     

    Is food a feminist issue? Yes. This course surveys contemporary feminist debates in food politics. Throughout the semester, we will explore feminist analyses of food practices, dietary choice, and nutrition advice. We will consider feminist approaches to food ethics and consumption from critical race, postcolonial, queer, critical disability and critical animal studies perspectives. In addition, we will engage in feminist analyses of weight loss dieting, body image, and eating disorders; and we will examine gendered relationships to food through studying the gendering of diets, the politics of breastfeeding, and links between eating, eroticism, and sexuality.

    Instructor: ROSARIO, Esther
    Days & Time: M/W, 18:00 - 21:00

    Units:
    *3.00
    Prerequisite: none
    Notes:  Not open to students with credit in WGS 340 (or W ST 340)

     

    Click here to see full course poster (PDF)!

  • * WGS 470: Sexualities - Sexual Violence

     

    What is sexual violence? What makes sexual violence "sexual" and what constitutes its violence and violation? What kinds of sexual violence currently exist and how should we address—and redress—them in policy, law, and life? Why are women of color and trans*people of color disproportionately subject to sexualized violence? And why is it important that we clearly conceptualize the different kinds of sexual violence affecting our contemporary world for the sake of social justice?

    In WGS 470, we will explore the political, ethical, and experiential issues surrounding sexual violence through feminist theory, fiction, and film. Topics and case studies will include: "unjust sex," martial and marital rape, incest, "sexual obligations," sexual autonomy, objectification, the eroticization and exoticization of racialized bodies, sexual trafficking and prostitution, disability and sexuality, pornography and silencing, heteronormative and transphobic personal-boundary violations.

    Instructor: LABRADA, Eloy
    Days & Time: T/R, 10:30 - 13:30
    Units: *3.00
    Prerequisite:
    Any 100- or 200-level WGS (or W ST) course, or Department consent
    Note: May be repeated for credit 

     

    Click here to see full course poster (PDF)!