Courses

ProSeminar Series: Fall 2017

The Pro Seminars are organized by Lisa Claypool, Associate Chair of Graduate Studies and Research Programs in Art & Design.

400/500/600-Level Art History Seminar Courses

NOTE: these courses are taught in conjunction. The combined enrollment for 400/500 level courses is 12 students. All students require consent of the department to register in the following courses. Refer to Bear Tracks for current schedule (term, days and times) these courses are offered.

HADVC 400/600 A1: Theory and Methods in the History of Art, Design and Visual Culture
Fall term, Wednesday, 2:00-4:50pm
Instructor: Betsy Boone
This course provides students with an introduction to theories and methodologies employed in the study of art, design, and visual culture. We will examine a wide range of approaches, covering both historical and contemporary materials and debates. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are normally expected to have completed one 300- level course with a minimum grade of B.

HADVC 411/511 B1: Æsthetics and Materiality
Winter term, Wednesday, 2:00-4:50pm
Instructor: Steven Harris
In this course, we will investigate the renewed interest in æsthetics in recent years, in conjunction with an investigation of those practices in the visual arts that foreground their materials. The focus of the course will be on the æsthetic thought of Theodor W. Adorno, Jacques Rancière, and others in its relation to artistic practice, but we will first consider the modern history of æsthetics more generally, as well as examples of materialist thought, before turning to contemporary æsthetics. For their research projects, students will investigate instances of artistic practice in which issues of æsthetics and materiality are foregrounded. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are normally expected to have completed one 300-level course with a minimum grade of B.

HADVC 412/512 A1: Picturing Science in Modern China
Fall Term, Thursday, 2:00 – 4:50 p.m.
Instructor: Lisa Claypool
The ink brushes of modern painters were employed as tools of the nation in early twentieth-century China. Yet the expression of a radical idealism about the new republic in their ink paintings was tempered early on by a tentative and self-conscious exploration of new ways of seeing. By synthesizing a “universal” scientific gaze with their idiosyncratically trained vision as artists, they created practices of seeing were connective, ductile, and boundary-crossing, moving across and dwelling within diverse ecologies of material knowledge, whether European sciences, Japanese museums, or connoisseurship of Song-dynasty scrolls. The artists also were attentive to the biophysical world, open to improvisation and alive to the work of pictures as mediators between language and living form. This seminar will explore their pursuit of knowledge in movement, asking “what do we know when we see?” Students will co-curate an online exhibition about intersections of science and the arts and learn how to write exhibition labels and catalogue essays. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are normally expected to have completed one 300- level course with a minimum grade of B.

HADVC 412/512 B1: Place, History, and Ethnography in Chinese Painting, Prints, and Maps
Winter term, Tuesday, 11:00-1:50pm
Instructor: Walter Davis
This seminar considers the intersecting concerns of place, history, and ethnography in pictorial and cartographic representation of the Ming and Qing dynasties (14th – early-20th centuries). By what means and to what ends did late imperial China’s painting, printmaking, and mapmaking depict real places, events, and peoples? How did such forms of representation register developments in international trade, imperial expansion (Chinese and European), and cross-cultural exchange? In what ways did visual portrayals of the topographic and the historic reproduce established beliefs and values and formulate new ones? How did such representations articulate personal, local, and cultural identities within a dynamic visual field? We will address such questions through discussions of secondary scholarship, presentations of student research, and firsthand viewing of paintings and prints in the university’s Mactaggart Art Collection. Graded work will include contributions to class discussions, oral presentations, and a substantial research paper. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are required to have completed one 300-level course with a minimum grade of B.

HADVC 455/555 A1: Second Half of the Nineteenth Century: Religion and Art (1848 – 1914)
Fall term, Tuesday, 11:00-1:50pm
Instructor: Joan Greer
This seminar will examine religion and art in the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, focusing on Realist and Symbolist artistic production (primarily painting, sculpture, photography and the graphic arts) in Europe and North America. Note: This course may be taken for credit towards their program by majors and minors in the Interdisciplinary Program in Religious Studies. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are required to have completed one 300-level course with a minimum grade of B; Art H 255 strongly recommended.

HADVC 456/556 B1: Art and the Anthropocene
Winter term, Wednesday, 11:00-1:50pm
Instructor: Natalie S. Loveless
James Lovelock, known for having co-created the Gaia hypothesis with Lynn Margulis, was recently quoted as saying that “saving the planet is a foolish, romantic extravagance.” This course will examine how perspectives such as Lovelock's reorient artistic production in the 21st century, with particular attention to debate surrounding the so-called ‘anthropocene.’ The anthropocene, as a political term, has increasingly found itself at the center of contemporary discourse in the arts, with numerous books, exhibitions, articles and journals devoted to it. Readings will examine contemporary debates surrounding the anthropogenic climate change and examine the impact of such debates on art practice and scholarship. Students will be expected to engage with the course “research-creationally” – bringing scholarly attention to arts practice and artistic attention to academic scholarship. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are normally expected to have completed one 300- level course with a minimum grade of B; Art H 256 and Art H 336 are recommended. As this course is taught "research-creationally" it is highly recommended that interested students speak to the instructor prior to registering. Prerequisites: Consent of the department. Students are required to have completed one 300-level course with a minimum grade of B.

ART/DES 630 A1: Theories and Approaches in Contemporary Art & Design
Fall term, Friday, 11:00-1:50pm
Instructor: Natalie S. Loveless
This course is limited to first-year graduate students in the department of Art and Design. Texts and discussions will address the intersections of art, theory and design from an integrated and exploratory perspective. The seminar is designed to give students tools and methods with which to respond to the world critically, investigate how cultural values can be transmitted through art and design, and communicate their discoveries and opinions clearly in writing. Prerequisites: Required for all incoming MFA and MDes students. Incoming MA and PhD students may take it with consent of department.