Courses

Proseminars FALL 2019 Friday morning sessions

Proseminars FALL 2019 Special Wednesday afternoon sessions open to undergraduates

The proseminars are organized by Lisa Claypool, Associate Chair of Graduate Studies and Research

400/500-Level HADVC Seminar Courses

 

HADVC 400/600 A1 (*3) Theories and Methods in the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture

Fall term, M 14:00-16:50
Instructor: Lianne McTavish
This course provides participants with an introduction to theories and methodologies in the study of the history of art, design, and visual culture. We will examine a wide range of approaches, covering both historical and contemporary examples. The course covers biographical, formal, iconographic, semiotic, Marxian, feminist, and phenomenological approaches to the study of visual culture, as well as those informed by literary theory, film studies, queer theory, material culture studies, and critical museum theory.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

 

HADVC 403/503 B1 (*3) Topics in Early Modern Art, Design, and Visual Culture:The Early Modern Body in Europe, 1450–1800

Winter term, W 14:00-16:50
Instructor: Lianne McTavish

Scholars increasingly examine how early modern bodies were produced in a range of representations, including literary texts, medical engravings, theatrical performances, and portraiture. The study of these bodies has become a distinctive field of inquiry, and this upper-level seminar introduces students to its historiography, major debates, and dominant themes, with an emphasis on visual articulations of the body. Prerequisite:Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

 

HADVC 411/511 A1 (*3) Special Topics in the History of Art, Design and Visual Culture: World's Fairs and Centennial Celebrations

Fall term, W 9:30-12:20
Instructor: M. Elizabeth Boone
World’s Fairs and Centennial Expositions were organized in the 19th and 20th centuries to mark a variety of milestones—from the anniversary of the U.S. and French Revolutions (1876 and 1889) to the independence of Mexico and the opening of the Panama Canal (1910 and 1915)—inspiring both organizers and their guests to reflect upon the characteristics of their culture and its relationship to other cultural traditions. This course examines this phenomenon with particular attention to the national displays of art and industry in Western Europe and the Americas.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 412/512 A1 (*3) Topics in Asian Art, Design, and Visual Culture: EcoArt China

Fall term, R 14:00-16:50
Instructor: Lisa Claypool
How do pictures make the world? Our curatorial class project poses this question of pictorial arts in 21st-century China, mostly by brush-and-ink painters, but also by photographers, intermedia artists, and video artists. Their artworks convey their struggles with the capitalist-scientific rationalities that have prefigured the end of the world, but embody the emotions and imaginative drive to remake the world as well. Students in the class will co-curate a forthcoming exhibition of eco-art by contemporary Chinese artists in the FAB Gallery, and write catalogue copy.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 412/512 B1 (*3) Topics in Asian Art, Design, and Visual Culture: Shanghai Moderns, 1842-1949.

Winter term, T, 14:00-16:50
Instructor: Walter Davis
This seminar considers how artists and other participants in the Chinese art world diversely addressed and articulated Chinese modernity during the final years of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) and in the Republican period (1912-1949). We will examine developments in such media and fields as painting, calligraphy, seal carving, prints, collecting, connoisseurship, advertising, art education, exhibitions, and the art market. Class activities will include discussions of secondary scholarship, presentations of student research, and firsthand viewing of works in the university’s Mactaggart Art Collection. Graded work will include contributions to class discussions, oral presentations, and a substantial research paper.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 456/556 B1 (*3) Topics in Contemporary Art: The Content of the Form

Winter term, R, 14:00-16:50
Instructors: Steven Harris/Natalie Loveless
What is artistic form? How has it been debated historically and how is it talked about in contemporary art and criticism today? How elastic are its limits? And how does attention to form help us track debates on art’s function in both a modern and contemporary context? Taking its title from Hayden White’s book of the same name, this course will trace debates on form from the Russian avant-garde turn to abstraction (non-objective art) to the frameworks of dialogic and relational aesthetics that have, of late, animated contemporary art. Topics will include representation versus abstraction; form and formalism; dematerialization and anti-form; art and politics; and end with the question of how the social (Beuys), the relational (Bourriaud), and the dialogic (Kester) can be understood as æsthetic form. Readings will be drawn from historical and theoretical sources as well as artist writings. Work shown and discussed will range from the so-called “traditional” media of painting and sculpture to contemporary forms such as installation and performance.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.