Courses

500/600-level HADVC Seminar Courses

HADVC 600 A1 (*3) Theories and Methods in the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture
Fall term, T 9:30-12:20
Instructor: Lianne McTavish

This course provides participants with an introduction to theories and methodologies in the study of the history of art, design, and visual culture. We will examine a wide range of approaches, covering both historical and contemporary examples. The course covers biographical, formal, iconographic, semiotic, Marxian, feminist, and phenomenological approaches to the study of visual culture, as well as those informed by literary theory, film studies, queer theory, material culture studies, and critical museum theory.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 511 A1 (*3) Art & Animals
Fall term, M 9:30-12:20
Instructor: M. Elizabeth Boone

Animals, both wild and domesticated, were regularly exhibited during the long nineteenth century. They appeared on canvas and as sculpture in fine art exhibitions; as public art works marking fairgrounds, parks, and zoos; mounted through the art of taxidermy; and live in circus performances, rodeos, and at agricultural fairs. Some animals-usually those known for their performance abilities, noteworthy value, or bloodlines-appear in named portraits, while others functioned as type, to evoke particular emotions, or to communicate societal values and attitudes about these non-human beings. This class will explore the current state of animal studies and the representation of animals in an exhibitionary context.
Prerequisite:
Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 512 A2 (*3) Traditionalist Visions of Modern Japanese Art & Design
Fall term, R, 9:30-12:20
Instructor: Walter Davis

As industrialization, colonialism, and nationalism reshaped East Asia in the late-19th and early 20th centuries, Japan rapidly transformed to survive and flourish in a new era. This seminar examines how visual articulations of tradition contributed to this transformation. In what ways have traditions been represented, constructed, and deployed? How did Japanese artists, designers, intellectuals, and institutions seek to reformulate and develop Japanese art and design without abandoning Japan's ostensibly unique and longstanding culture? How have their efforts reshaped understandings of Japanese identity over the course of the modern era? Examining art and design from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the end of the Pacific War in 1945, including painting, photography, printmaking, architecture, commercial design, and fashion, we will investigate visual and material manifestations and deployments of neo-traditional values within such modern contexts as art schools, artistic societies, public parks and museums, department stores, and publishing ventures. Seminar sessions will articulate weekly themes through reading and discussion of secondary scholarship, consideration of select works of art and design, and student research reports on assigned topics. Term work will include in-class reports and a substantial research project that issues in a conference-style presentation and a research paper.
Prerequisite:
Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 511 B1 (*3) History of Museums
Winter Term, R 12:30-3:20
Instructor: Lianne McTavish

Museums are no longer considered "neutral" spaces that simply preserve valuable objects for the education and enjoyment of the public. Questions have been raised about the social function of museums: Do these institutions reinforce class distinctions? Do organized exhibition spaces guide the visitor through a narrative of national identity? Whose (hi)story is told in museums and who gets to tell it? Who benefits, financially or otherwise, from museum exhibits? Students will analyze different approaches to these questions by reading historical and theoretical texts about the earliest cabinets of curiosities, the "universal survey museum" of the nineteenth century, and contemporary organizations. Our case studies will be based on museums and display areas in Alberta, mostly local ones, with a few corresponding readings about these organizations.
Prerequisite:
Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.

HADVC 555 B1 (*3): Visualizing Nature in Art, Design, and Visual Culture in the Long 19th Century
Winter Term, T 11:00-1:50
Instructor: Joan Greer

In this course we will examine how "nature" was theorized and represented in the visual and applied arts from 1789-1914. On the one hand, this will include investigating art works focusing especially on landscape, botanical and zoological subject matter. On the other, it will include landscape design and nature motifs in Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau design. How such representations relate to early environmental and scientific discourses will be considered. Theories of the Anthropocene, Animal Studies and Environmental History will inform our enquiries. Traditional classifications such as Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Symbolism, while acknowledged and considered in this course, give way to a revisionary approach to the material that privileges the overarching question of "nature" and the environment within visual representation and design, in this way remaining disciplinarily specific while aligning itself with the larger concerns found within the Environmental Humanities.
Prerequisites:
Consent of department. Note: Students are required to have completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-. Art H 205 and/or 255 strongly recommended.

HADVC 556 B1 (*3) Topics in Contemporary Art: The Content of the Form
Winter term, R 14:00-16:50
Instructors: Steven Harris/Natalie Loveless

What is artistic form? How has it been debated historically and how is it talked about in contemporary art and criticism today? How elastic are its limits? And how does attention to form help us track debates on art's function in both a modern and contemporary context? Taking its title from Hayden White's book of the same name, this course will trace debates on form from the Russian avant-garde turn to abstraction (non-objective art) to the frameworks of dialogic and relational aesthetics that have, of late, animated contemporary art. Topics will include representation versus abstraction; form and formalism; dematerialization and anti-form; art and politics; and end with the question of how the social (Beuys), the relational (Bourriaud), and the dialogical (Kester) can be understood as æsthetic form. Readings will be drawn from historical and theoretical sources as well as artist writings. Work shown and discussed will range from painting and sculpture to installation and performance.
Prerequisite:
Consent of Department. Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level HADVC courses with a minimum grade of B-.