Schedule

Come on out virtually for posters, papers, teaching exhibitions, great discussions, and more from U of A instructors that align with the theme: "(Re)Imagining Post-Pandemic Pedagogies: Critical, Creative, and Affective Reflections on Where We Are Now, Where We've Come From, and Where We're Hoping to Go."

The following schedule is subject to change.


Date Time Session
Tuesday,
May 3
9:00am - 9:30am MST Elder's Prayer
Elder Cardinal Gilman

Welcome
Tommy Mayberry, Executive Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning

9:30am - 10:45am MST

Keynote Introduction
John Nychka, Vice-Provost (Learning Initiatives)

Student Keynote Conversation: Accommodation and Proactive Design
Rhythm Singh & Thaovy Nguyen | Danielle Lorenz (moderator)

Our students’ voices need to be heard and centred now more than ever. These Student Keynote Conversations are opportunities for the U of A teaching and learning community to listen to and hear from some of our students on their lived experiences with accommodations and design in teaching and learning. A desired outcome is that we as a community, in re-imagining our post-pandemic pedagogies at the U of A, can work toward more proactive design in our teaching and learning with our real students' voices in mind.

11:00am - 11:50am MST

Taking Pandemic online learning into a flipped classroom for in-class teaching
Sabina Valentine (Agricultural, Life & Environmental Sciences)

This session will share the experiences and observations of transforming the online classroom into the flipped classroom for undergraduate nutrition students.

Hybrid Teaching and Active Learning: Friend or Foe?
Kim Meszaros & Hani Henein (Engineering)

In this session, we will share our experience with case-based instruction in a 4th-year materials engineering design course. We implemented this active learning strategy in a hybrid format over the Fall 2021 term. Despite a rocky start, the student experience was mostly consistent with that of an in-person classroom. Student self-evaluations about graduation readiness provided us with information about the outcome of our active learning, hybrid teaching efforts.

12:00pm - 1:00pm MST

President Bill Flanagan's 2022 State of the University Address

We are encouraging the U of A teaching and learning community to attend President Bill Flanagan's 2022 State of the University Address.

1:00pm - 1:50pm MST

Crafting in the Humanities Classroom
Andrea Korda, Priscilla Adebanji, Juliana Carrier (Augustana)

This session on “Crafting in the Humanities Classroom” introduces the concepts of “critical making” (Ratto) and “embodied humanities” (Davis) though a case study of a course offered in Winter 2022 on Modern Art. Instead of studying familiar artworks by Pablo Picasso or Jackson Pollock, students learned about the history of modern visual and material by crafting optical toys, collages, and rag rugs. This session shares strategies for incorporating hands-on making into teaching and learning and considers its benefits for community building, accessibility, and for honing skills in critical reflection.

All Aboard! Annotation Stations and Student Engagement in a Pandemic Classroom
Melissa Li Sheung Ying (Arts)

In this presentation, come hear how one educator chose to implement an Annotation Station teaching method to foster co-learning and the co-creation of knowledge in her online classroom. She'll also give you a behind-the-scenes look at the planning, care, and debrief(s) that were integral to her students’ success with this community-building activity and its transferability to the in-person environment post-pandemic.

1:50pm - 2:00pm MST Closing Remarks
Tommy Mayberry, Executive Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning
Wednesday,
May 4
9:00am - 9:10am MST

Welcome
Tommy Mayberry, Executive Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning

9:10am - 10:00am MST

‘Gen Z’: Lessons from the Technology Generation on Post Pandemic Education
Kyrie Kuss & Sydney Podgurny (Nursing)

The proposed session will explore and review how technology influences undergraduate education. Literature on how ‘Gen z’ learns as well as the shift in learning continuums due to Covid will be tied together. The overall goal of this session will be to immerse learners in this topic and create discussion points and knowledge to create change in post secondary education.

Exploring Virtual Teaching Approaches Among Pediatricians During the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic:
A virtual ethnographic study

Marghalara Rashid (Medicine & Dentistry)

We wanted to gain an in-depth understanding of paediatricians' perspectives of virtual teaching using virtual ethnography and field observations, focusing on the following question: How is synchronous virtual teaching impacting and transforming teaching experiences of paediatricians during a pandemic and how will teaching look like moving forward once we are out of COVID pandemic?

10:15am - 10:45am MST

VIRTUAL POSTER SHOWCASE and TEACHING EXHIBITION

Decolonizing our Approaches to Teaching Economics
Laurel Wheeler (Arts)

This session will describe the strategies one instructor has employed to decolonize and Indigenize courses in economics. The objective is to share learnings and to provide information about concrete practices that can be adopted to ground pedagogies in Indigenous Knowledge and methods.

Empowering the International Student Voice in University Courses: Practical Tips and Strategies from ELS instructors
Zuzana Buchanan, Barbara Edmondson & Sofia Elgueta Duplancic (Education)

In a short informative video instructors from the English Language School share strategies to engage international students in a post pandemic classroom. The video focuses on different methods that instructors and professors can use to support language & overcome cultural barriers that international students are facing. These strategies should help UofA instructors empower international students to actively contribute with more confidence.

The Perceptions of Dental Hygiene Students About an Asynchronous Oral Biology Course
Nazlee Sharmin & Ava K. Chow (Medicine & Dentistry)

Medical and dental schools have long-established pedagogical approaches to teacher-centered face-to-face learning. The Dental Hygiene (DH) program at the University of Alberta is no exception. Oral Biology II (OBIOL 302) is an intermediate-level course in the DH program that has been moved to an asynchronous online format to manage the disruptions of the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted an explanatory mixed-method study to explore the factors affecting the student experience of this diverse class in an online, asynchronous learning environment. Our study identified the major factors affecting the online learning experience of students from the students’ point of view, which will be a helpful guide to design more effective online courses for health science education.

Developing a Digitally Immersive Clinical Experience
Jen Dewhurst, Brian Chwyl & Cody Wesley (Medicine & Dentistry)

The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged educators to develop novel technical solutions to several pedagogical and logistical problems. Such problems include 1) teaching clinical skills in a virtual environment, and 2) sharing our clinical role with other health professionals. Immersive video/virtual reality technology allows the viewer an unprecedented viewing experience of almost being there. We have developed two immersive VR videos to meet these challenges. This talk will share our inspiration and experiences developing these projects and where we hope to go from here.

11:00am - 11:50am MST

Creating a New Normal for Work Integrated Learning Advising
Anita Dapaah, Amanda Tam & Fred Mills (Engineering)

During this session we will share our own experiences of advising Co-op operative education students who have been based around the world during this pandemic, sharing the benefits and challenges experienced. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions and also share their own experiences and best practices in student advising. Areas for discussion include privacy, equitable access and flexible methods of advising.

12:00pm - 12:50pm MST

A Secondary Database for Active Learning of Genetics in the Dentistry Program
Nazlee Sharmin & Ava K. Chow (Medicine & Dentistry)

Students at the School of Dentistry study genetics of tooth and facial development through didactic lectures only. There is a growing surge towards applying active learning strategies to teach genetics in higher education. We have developed a secondary database called ‘Genetics for Dentistry’ to use as an active learning tool for teaching genetics in the dentistry program. Currently (phase 1), the database contains human genes involved in enamel and dentin formation. The data can be searched by gene name, protein sequence, chromosomal location, cellular function, and other keywords related to protein and gene function. Students can identify interacting protein partners, find the role of a protein in a metabolic pathway, identify mutations, and access related literature. ‘Genetics for Dentistry’ will be introduced as an active learning tool for teaching genetics at the School of Dentistry. The database-infused activities will supplement the genetics lecture in the dentistry program. We hope that incorporating this database as an active learning tool will reduce students’ cognitive load for learning genetics and make them interested in new branches of science like bioinformatics and precision dentistry.

A Call to Action: Pedagogies for Career-Integrated Learning and Interdisciplinarity in School Communities
Colleen Knechtel (Secondary Education)

While employers are prioritizing new skill sets such as creative/problem-solving skills, digital skills, skills related to international collaboration, and social/human skills, our education and training systems are simply not keeping pace. Canada is ranked 10th of 36 countries prepared for the demand of future skills (OECD, 2022). How might educators embrace change and collaborate to advance employment opportunities for students in our shifting economy while strengthening school communities during this time of transition?

1:00pm - 1:50pm MST

No Going Back: Problem-based Learning Pedagogy in the Virtual Space -
Demonstrating Integrative Learning through a Stakeholder Roundtable Simulation
Ruth Wolfe, Hector Villarroel Ocando, Falynn Bilyk, Jeff Johnson, Dean Eurich & Jesse Alook (School of Public Health)

Using Problem-based Learning in a graduate-level Master of Public Health course, student teams work to address complex public health challenges, culminating in a team simulation of a Stakeholder Roundtable. Excerpts of three student teams’ recorded Stakeholder Roundtables and reflective Debriefs showcase how the different components of the course build on each other towards an “aha” moment that reflects integrative learning, and reveal the advantages of the virtual space for this type of class exercise.

1:50pm - 2:00pm MST Closing Remarks
Tommy Mayberry, Executive Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning
Thursday,
May 5
9:00am -10:10am MST

Keynote Introduction
John Nychka, Vice-Provost (Learning Initiatives)

Student Keynote Conversation: Accommodation and Proactive Design
Delaney MacIntosh, Emmarie Brown, Jenna Dewar & Kate Erhardt | Danielle Lorenz (moderator)

Our students’ voices need to be heard and centred now more than ever. These Student Keynote Conversations are opportunities for the U of A teaching and learning community to listen to and hear from some of our students on their lived experiences with accommodations and design in teaching and learning. A desired outcome is that we as a community, in re-imagining our post-pandemic pedagogies at the U of A, can work toward more proactive design in our teaching and learning with our real students' voices in mind.

10:15am - 11:05am MST

Mobile Apps as a Form of Remote Experiential Learning: Replicating empirical findings within cognitive psychology
Ben Dyson (Arts)

To meet the challenge of experiential learning in the context of remote teaching, 8 ‘Flex Labs’ were set up in a 2nd year Cognitive Psychology course. Each lab was delivered via mobile phone and attempted to replicate an historic or contemporary finding (1976 – 2016) related to course content. I will demonstrate the app, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of remote data collection, and, illustrate how our data speak to the 'replication crisis' within science.

Developing an Interactive Computer Program for Integrated Dental Education
Nazlee Sharmin & Ava K. Chow (Medicine & Dentistry)

The knowledge of anatomy is integrated with many other disciplines of medical and dental education. The three-dimensional conception of anatomical structures forms the foundation of physiology and pathology. Traditional 3D models used to teach anatomy cannot represent the dynamic physiological processes and lack structural detail in oral regions needed for dental education. We have developed a computer program called ‘Jawnatomy’ as a 3D graphic of the human head and oral cavity, including hard and soft tissues. Keller’s attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction (ARCS) model of the motivational design was used while creating the tool to improve learners’ motivation and engagement. Blender was used to create the graphics; Unity 3D was used to incorporate interactivity in the program. Jawnatomy will be launched for project- and team-based learning. This program will also be introduced to the students as a self-directed learning tool to help them practice and strengthen their anatomical knowledge at their own pace. Surveys and focus groups will be conducted to evaluate and further improve the computer program.

11:10am - 12:00pm MST

Playfulness to Support Learning, Creating Engaging Learning Artifacts
Jen Dewhurst (Medicine & Dentistry)

This talk will discuss some of the opportunities within teaching that the pandemic has brought to us. It will highlight the opportunity to use content that is currently developed but reimagine it in interesting ways, also allowing for flexible learning environments. Focusing on creativity within pedagogical delivery this discussion will encourage the audience to not necessarily reinvent the wheel but to take advantage of technology and a playful spirit to do it differently and better engage with their students as they do.

Building Experiential Education Capacity Using a Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) Strategy:
The past, present and future for “making this work” in pharmacy education
Ann Thompson & Michelle MacDonald (Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences)

Experiential education is a required component of pharmacy education, and across our PharmD programs, approximately 950 placements are planned and delivered annually, with 450 offered in Alberta Health Services sites provincially. Using effective and efficient preceptorship models, such as peer-assisted learning (PAL), have been an important strategy to develop the capacity needed to deliver our programs. The approach used, as well as resources developed, will be shared with the academy.

12:00pm MST

Closing Remarks
Tommy Mayberry, Executive Director, Centre for Teaching and Learning