Political Science Annual lecture
Rob Nichols, "Theft is Property: Dispossession and Critical Theory" 
with responses from Isabel Altamirano, Cressida Heyes, and Jakeet Singh
Tuesday, October 27, 3:30-5:00 [Please note the change of date]

Watch the 45-minute talk in advance of the discussion: https://youtu.be/e0wV1s3cwVQ

Register to participate in the discussion: https://ualberta-ca.zoom.us/j/97529476326?pwd=QlZzU29CclJUb1pjU0pyRlhJTWdqdz09

tp-cover.jpg

In his recent publication, Theft is Property! (Duke 2020), Robert Nichols reconstructs the concept of dispossession as a means of examining how shifting configurations of law, property, race, and rights have functioned as modes of governance, both historically and in the present. Through close analysis of arguments by Indigenous scholars and activists from the nineteenth century to the present, Nichols argues that dispossession has come to name a unique recursive process whereby systematic theft is the mechanism by which property relations are generated. In so doing, this work also brings long-standing debates in anarchist, Black radical, feminist, Marxist, and postcolonial thought into direct conversation with the frequently overlooked intellectual contributions of Indigenous peoples.

Robert Nichols is Associate Professor of Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Minnesota (Twin Cities). He is the author of Theft is Property! Dispossession and Critical Theory (Duke 2020) and The World of Freedom: Heidegger, Foucault, and the Politics of Historical Ontology (Stanford 2014).

 

Universal Design in Higher Education: Gaps and Possibilities of Online
Teaching 
October 30, 2:00-3:30 pm
universal-design-in-higher-education.jpg
What has Universal Design become in Canadian higher education? Do the people who use the term know what it means or what it might look like? Or does Universal Design have only a performative function, divorced from the lived experience of disability, separate from the exigencies and the limitations of the classroom? As Universal Design gets mentioned and referenced more, has higher education actually become less accessible? 

Keynote Jay Dolmage, Professor of English, University of Waterloo, an international expert on access and academic ableism will answer these questions in a 30 minute presentation. Brief responses will be shared by Ada Jaarsma (Professor, Philosophy, Mount Royal University), Lindsay Eales (Assistant Professor, Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation, University of Alberta) and Matt Wildcat (Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Alberta) before an open discussion with participants.

 
Reflecting on the US Election: A Roundtable
Thursday, November 5, 3:30-5:00 pm

Featuring Nermin Allam (Rutgers), Greg Anderson (UAlberta), Monty Bal (UAlberta), Russell Cobb (UAlberta), and Judy Garber(UAlberta), Mariam Georgis (U Manitoba).

Register here:  https://ualberta-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwsd-GhrDgqGdci8ASGEweu8mqefujZ6Mom 

November, date TBA

Roundtable: Free Expression on Campus: Public Policy Responses to the Alleged ‘Crisis'  featuring Samir Gandesha (Simon Fraser University), Richard Moon (University of Windsor), Katja Thieme (UBC), and Cara Zwibel (Canadian Civil Liberties Association), moderated by Dax D'Orazio (University of Alberta).

December, date TBA

Online roundtable on the politics and pedagogies of university teaching and learning during pandemic

Featuring Rachel George, Renée McBeth, and TBA.

 

Past talks from this term

"The Politics of Academic Restructuring at the University of Alberta"  (September 16, 2020)  WATCH VIDEO
A critical discussion of the 'University of Alberta for Tomorrow' process and its broader political contexts, featuring Ricardo Acuña (AASUA), Laurie Adkin (Political Science), Andy Knight (Political Science), Prachi Mishra (NASA), Sourayan Mookerjea (Sociology), and Fiona Nicoll (Political Science).
 
"COVID Time: A Roundtable" (September 24, 2020) WATCH VIDEO

screen-shot-2020-09-21-at-10.54.12-am.jpg

Bios:

  • Catherine Clune-Taylor, Ph.D. (she/her/hers) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women's Studies at San Diego State University, specializing in Feminist Science and Technology Studies.She has published articles in Hypatia, The American Journal of Public Health, and PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture. She is currently at work on a book project titled Securing Cisgendered Futures: Managing Gender in the Twenty-First Century.
  • Lauren Guilmette is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Elon University, where she arrived in 2019. Before that, she taught at Florida Atlantic University since getting her doctorate from Emory in 2014. Her research engages theories of affect and feeling, feminist philosophy and the continental tradition. Recently she has published three articles on the insights of the late feminist theorist Teresa Brennan, a chapter in 50 Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology (Northwestern UP) on "Queer Orientations," and has a piece forthcoming that draws on Sylvia Wynter's decolonial critique of "Man" to engage the purported universality of facial expressions.
  • Amy Kaler is a professor in the Department of Sociology at the Univeristy of Alberta and an adjunct professor in the Division of Community Engagement, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry. She has received the annual Faculty of Arts Research Excellence Award at assistant, associate and full professor levels, and is a recipient of the Killam Annual Professorship and the Mactaggart Travel Award for Narrative Writing. Dr Kaler's current research projects involve the social and institutional contexts of infectious diseases, AIDS activism and reproductive health, household survival in rural Africa, and histories of missionaries and faith-based international humanitarianism. She has a PhD in sociology and feminist studies from the University of Minnesota and a postdoctoral fellowship in population health. She is one of the team leads for Stories of Change, a Signature Area of Excellence in the Faculty of Arts. 
 
Kim Tallbear, "A Sharpening of the Already Present: An Indigenous Materialist Reading of Settler Apocalypse 2020"
Friday, October 9, 3:00-4:00   WATCH VIDEO

tallbear-talk.jpg