Media Releases


Scientists find oxidized iron deep within the Earth’s interior

EXTRACT: Scientists find oxidized iron deep within the Earth’s interior Unexpected finding shows surprises geoscientists around the world By Katie Willis on January 22, 2018 Scientists digging deep into the Earth’s mantle recently made an unexpected discovery. Five hundred and fifty kilometres below the Earth’s surface, they found highly oxidized iron, similar to the rust ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2018-01-22

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Oxidized iron in garnets from the mantle transition zone

EXTRACT: The oxidation state of iron in Earth’s mantle is well known to depths of approximately 200?km, but has not been characterized in samples from the lowermost upper mantle (200–410?km depth) or the transition zone (410–660?km depth). Natural samples from the deep (>200?km) mantle are extremely rare, and are usually only ...

Media source: Nature Geoscience · 2018-01-22

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Climate change is actually good for something: Alberta barley

EXTRACT: Climate change is actually good for something: Alberta barley By Jennifer Crosby | January 18, 2018 A new study from the University of Alberta shows climate change could benefit Alberta barley crops. The study shows climate change is likely to lead to an increase in barley yields. The key is a reduced need ...

Media source: Global News · 2018-01-18

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On the trail of tungsten

EXTRACT: On the trail of tungsten New economic geology professor searches for critical metals. By Jennifer Pascoe on January 10, 2018 Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez is on the hunt for critical metal-bearing mineral deposits, while navigating not only economic but also environmental needs. The Spain-born scientist’s search has now brought her to the University of Alberta, ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2018-01-10

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Researcher solves the riddle of how a curling rock achieves the sport’s eponymous curl

EXTRACT: Researcher solves the riddle of how a curling rock achieves the sport’s eponymous curl It took four years and the perfect analogy to figure it out. By NATALIE SAMSON | JAN 09 2018 A curling rock curves down a sheet of ice like the blade in a circular saw jams against a ...

Media source: University Affairs · 2018-01-09

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'A perfect storm': Alberta Beach ice quake is a mystery, says Edmonton expert

EXTRACT: 'A perfect storm': Alberta Beach ice quake is a mystery, says Edmonton expert 'The mystery there is why would it warm, expand, and then crack? That's the mystery' CBC News Posted: Jan 04, 2018 10:23 AM MT An earthquake that rattled houses in a village northwest of Edmonton Monday was no ...

Media source: CBC News · 2018-01-04

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Hack to the house: Scientist's mathematical model shows why a curling rock curls

EXTRACT: Hack to the house: Scientist's mathematical model shows why a curling rock curls Sadly for University of Alberta professor emeritus Ed Lozowski, his latest foray into the dynamics of ice friction may never be classed as performance-enhancing mathematics for curlers. By Juris Graney | Published on: December 11, 2017 His groundbreaking ...

Media source: Edmonton Journal · 2017-12-11

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Hard rock meets heavy metal

EXTRACT: Hard rock meets heavy metal Economic geologist focused on crystallizing Canada’s key role in global mineral deposits. By Jennifer Pascoe on December 12, 2017 “Picture the periodic table, and draw a box around the metals on it. Everything in that box is something that is needed for technology right now,” said Matt ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-12-05

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Ice scientist puts new spin on why curling rocks curl

EXTRACT: Ice scientist puts new spin on why curling rocks curl UAlberta researcher uses math to explain how a thrown rock acts like a jammed circular saw. By MICHAEL BROWN | December 5, 2017 The sporadic and hazardous jolts that accompany a circular saw that jams while cutting through a particularly heavy ...

Media source: Folio · 2017-12-05

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How barley is expected to benefit from climate change

EXTRACT: How barley is expected to benefit from climate change Warmer weather to have positive impact on global beef industry. By Jennifer Pascoe on November 30, 2017 Alberta’s most important feed crop for beef production will benefit from warmer temperatures and increased humidity, and so will the beef industry, new University of Alberta research ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-11-30

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Tailored education could increase use of city’s bike lanes

EXTRACT: Tailored education could increase use of city’s bike lanes Targeting specific groups could mean more riders year-round, researcher says. By BEV BETKOWSKI | November 24, 2017 Cities with bike lanes, like Edmonton, should also invest in outreach programs that coax more cyclists to ride during the winter, says a ...

Media source: Folio · 2017-11-24

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Ashes to Ashes

EXTRACT: Ashes to ashes Fingerprinting volcanic eruptions helps further complete climate puzzles. By Jennifer Pascoe on November 24, 2017 When it comes to understanding the past in order to predict the future, Britta Jensen, new assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, takes a keen interest in the study of volcanic ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-11-24

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Arctic, fragile vessel of nature, sustainable heritage

EXTRACT: ‘Arctic, fragile vessel of nature, sustainable heritage’ “As a civilization, we need to grow up and stop pushing the boundaries of nature that is intolerable and unsustainable. Let’s not put greed, money and economic development before fresh air, clean water and vibrant healthy communities.” By Joel Lee | Published ...

Media source: The Korean Herald · 2017-11-13

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Avoiding the wrongs of human rights in urban planning

EXTRACT: Avoiding the wrongs of human rights in urban planning Urban planners conduct cross-country scan to develop best practice bylaws and policies. By Jennifer Pascoe on November 7, 2017 When it comes to urban planning, the average Canadian might think of developing residential neighbourhoods, amenities such as schools, grocery stores, community centres, ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-11-07

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Finding the right balance

EXTRACT: Finding the right balance Thomas Chacko’s geology research and teaching have earned him a 2017 Killam Professorship. By Hallie Brodie with files from Scott Lingley on October 26, 2017 “It’s not too hot, not too cold, not too wet?—?everything is just right for life,” Earth and Atmospheric Sciences professor Thomas ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-10-26

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Meteor spotted over B.C. captivates people seeking insights, money from space rocks

EXTRACT: Meteor spotted over B.C. captivates people seeking insights, money from space rocks By Carrie Tait, October 13, 2017 A screengrab from a YouTube video taken from a security camera in Bridge Lake, B.C., and posted by Jacquie McKay shows a bright flash that lit up the sky on Sept. 4, ...

Media source: Globe and Mail · 2017-10-13

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Preserved in permafrost: from microbes to mammoths

EXTRACT: Preserved in permafrost: from microbes to mammoths New archive facility will push boundaries of climate change understanding. By Jennifer Pascoe on October 12, 2017 Professor Duane Froese searches for permafrost samples in the Canadian North. Photo supplied. Preserving fragile records of past life to inform future human activity just got exponentially easier. Thanks to a ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-10-12

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University of Alberta receives $18.6-million grant for research on permafrost, nanotechnology

EXTRACT: University of Alberta receives $18.6-million grant for research on permafrost, nanotechnology More from Hina Alam | Published on: October 12, 2017 Duane Froese (right) and graduate student Joe Young drill a permafrost core along the Dempster Highway, north of Dawson City, Yukon. Trees in particular and nature in general has fascinated ...

Media source: Edmonton Journal · 2017-10-12

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October 2017 Instructor of the Month: Chris Herd

EXTRACT: October 2017 Instructor of the Month: Chris Herd Meet this month's Instructor of the Month, Professor Chris Herd. By News staff on October 1, 2017 What do you teach? I teach courses in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, including EAS 224 (Mineralogy I), EAS 206 (Geology of the Solar System), EAS 467/567 (Planetary ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-10-01

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Long-term weather forecasting a guessing game

EXTRACT: Long-term weather forecasting a guessing game UAlberta weather modeling expert sets the record straight. September 21 2017 | By BEV BETKOWSKI Famous for its weather forecasts, the Old Farmer’s Almanac has published its predictions for the coming year—but don’t believe everything you read. The folksy pocket-sized magazine has been a regular go-to for farmers ...

Media source: Folio · 2017-09-21

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Pilot project in geothermal energy comes to Hinton, AB

EXTRACT: Pilot project in geothermal energy comes to Hinton, AB Alternative energy systems the next hottest thing in Alberta By Katie Willis on September 18, 2017 A UAlberta research partnership to retrofit wells near Hinton has the potential to provide megawatts of power to the local community. It’s the latest project to investigate the use ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-09-18

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Rethinking the classroom

EXTRACT: Rethinking the classroom Faculty of Science professors experiment with classroom innovation, online learning, and the student experience By Katie Willis on July 18, 2017 Human geography professor Theresa Garvin is revamping her classroom, alongside her colleagues in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. “There are a variety of learning styles—from auditory to kinesthetic ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-07-18

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How to enjoy Alberta’s summer skies—day and night

EXTRACT: How to enjoy Alberta’s summer skies—day and night Summer offers great views of clouds, other planets, solar events and sunrises and sunsets. Here’s what to look for and how best to enjoy them. By Bev Betkowski on June 23, 2017 The prairie sky offers the backdrop for some amazing vistas. The Alberta ...

Media source: Faculty of Science · 2017-06-23

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How urban sprawl has fragmented farms in the Edmonton-Calgary corridor since the 1980s

EXTRACT: How urban sprawl has fragmented farms in the Edmonton-Calgary corridor since the 1980s Jonny Wakefield | Published on: June 9, 2017 David Wedman and his family have had a front-row seat to Edmonton’s urban sprawl. Kayla Stan, a University of Alberta PhD student, shows some heat-map style images of ...

Media source: Edmonton Journal · 2017-06-09

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How The Changing Climate Affects Sea Level Rise

EXTRACT: How The Changing Climate Affects Sea Level Rise June 2nd, 2017 by Roy L Hales From DR Martin Sharp courtesy SMCC Webinar: Sea Level Rise and Climate Change Sea levels are already rising. One tends to think of impacts in the Third World but, between 1969 and 2010, Prince Edward Island lost ...

Media source: the Eco Report · 2017-06-02

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