Matina Kalcounis-Rueppell, College Dean of Natural and Applied Sciences

Matina Kalcounis-Rueppell

College Dean of Natural and Applied Sciences

Matina Kalcounis-Rueppell is the interim college dean of the University of Alberta’s College of Natural and Applied Sciences, which brings together the combined strength of the faculties of agricultural, life and environmental sciences, engineering, and science. It represents more than 625 faculty members and more than 17,000+ undergraduate and graduate students.

Research, Teaching and Community Engagement

Matina Kalcounis-Rueppell is an internationally recognized scientist whose research centers on the biology of acoustic communication in wild bats and mice, two biodiverse groups of mammals that communicate using ultrasound. Using innovative and integrative approaches in the field, she characterizes their communication behaviors and determines how ecological, physiological, and anthropogenic effects mediate those behaviors. She has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) as well as other government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and industry. Through her outreach program “Bats and Mice in Your Backyard”, she communicates her science, which has also been featured in the popular press, radio and television, and children’s literature, to the public.

Academic Career

She received B.Sc.Hons (1993) and M.Sc (1996) degrees in Biology from the University of Regina, and a Ph.D. in Zoology from Western University (2001). She held an NSERC postdoctoral fellowship at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California at Berkeley.

She was Dean of Science at the University of Alberta from 2019-2021. Prior to coming to the University of Alberta in 2019 she was the Head of the Biology Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She joined the Biology Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2003 where she spent 16 years and held positions as Director of Graduate Studies in Biology and Head of the Biology Department. She has led two scientific societies, the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, and the North American Society for Bat research. She is also a Professor of Biological Sciences.