grh-front-entrance-b-2010-600.jpg

 

Developmental Pediatrics

Welcome to the Developmental Pediatrics Residency Program at the University of Alberta.

 

First in Canada

The University of Alberta Developmental Pediatrics Program was the first of its kind in Canada. 

 

Teaching facilities 

The University of Alberta Developmental Pediatrics Program has one of the largest teaching faculties in all of Canada.

 

Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital

The Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital is the only free-standing, tertiary level rehabilitation facility in Canada.

 


Interview/CaRMS Specific Information 

Our program will be participating in the 2021 CaRMS match.

Upon receiving the application packages, all are reviewed and select candidates will be invited to interview. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all 2021 match cycle interviews will be conducted virtually via Zoom.

While we appreciate that this CaRMS matching process may be stressful, it is a valuable opportunity for us to get to know you, and for you to get to know us, as the best person-program fit is ultimately the goal.

Other events on interview day:

Lunch hour division rounds to meet staff and learn more about the program. Opportunities to meet with current residents and recent graduates. 

Contact Us

Developmental Pediatrics Residency Program
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental Pediatrics,
University of Alberta
Email: devpeds@ualberta.ca
Phone: 780-735-6097

Dr. Lisa Lemieux
Program Director, Developmental Pediatrics

Denise Biziaev
Program Administrator
Email: devpeds@ualberta.ca


pd-lisa-lemieux-2.jpg

Dr. Lisa Lemieux
Program Director

denise-pa-dev-peds.jpg

Denise Biziaev
Program Administrator


Denise Bereber-Biziaev's passion outside of her work at the University of Alberta is building a community of female skateboarders. Read Article

 

Welcome to Our Program

Our mission is to compassionately educate excellent developmental pediatricians and pediatric rehabilitation specialists—through personalized, comprehensive, and integrated learning opportunities—so that they may provide the highest quality of family-centered care and medical leadership to the communities they serve locally, nationally, and internationally.

The Developmental Pediatrics Subspecialty Residency Program at the University of Alberta is designed to meet the requirements of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The subspecialty residency program will prepare the resident for an independent career involving patient care, teaching, administration, and research. Within our division, there are research opportunities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), cerebral palsy, and complex pediatric outcomes, to name but a few.

Much of the program is centered at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, a tertiary development and rehabilitation site. We have an in-patient pediatric rehabilitation unit, neonatal follow up clinic, school assessment classrooms, clinical and research gait lab, and a world-class autism research center. We partner with the Stollery Children’s Hospital and other local sites for additional experiences.

Over the course of the program, subspecialty residents develop their e-portfolio.  The e-portfolio is structured to prepare the resident for practice, with simulated billing, creation of personal learning plans and registration of learning (future MAINPORT credit reporting), and other activities akin to what academic clinicians collect for annual reporting.  This is a valuable tool to document ongoing learning, and develop a repository of resources for future practice.  

Graduating subspecialty residents from this program work across Canada, and graduating fellows work in many countries around the world.

Dr. Lisa Lemieux
Program Director


Our Program

The Developmental Pediatrics Subspecialty Residency Program at the University of Alberta has been designed to meet, and at times exceed, the requirements of the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. The subspecialty residency program will prepare the resident for an independent career involving patient care, teaching, administration, and research.  Within our division, there are research opportunities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), cerebral palsy, and complex pediatric outcomes, to name but a few.

Program Highlights

highlight-card-coloursartboard-7.jpg
The primary learning site for the University of Alberta Developmental Pediatrics Program is the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, the only free-standing, tertiary level rehabilitation facility in Canada.  The Glenrose has several important services on site, such as the Courage in Motion Center, the Syncrude Center for Motion and Balance, the I CAN Center for Assistive Technology, the Autism Research Center, and a department for prosthetics and orthotics.  There is an in-patient unit serving children with complex rehabilitation needs, from the Northern Alberta and parts of Northern Canada catchment area.
...
Subspecialty residents develop an e-portfolio. The e-portfolio prepares the resident for practice, with simulated billing, creation of personal learning plans and registration of learning (future MAINPORT credit reporting), and other activities akin to what academic clinicians collect for annual reporting.
...
In 2020, we held our first Dev Peds Communication Course, exploring complex communication in challenging situations in the era of virtual medicine. Resident feedback included that, “Feedback was very thoughtful, detailed, and action-oriented.” Learners reported, “This course is one of the best courses I have done in my medical career,” and “This course was invaluable with lifelong lessons.
Our Dev Peds subspecialty residents lead a University of Alberta medical school elective in developmental disabilities. This experience is excellent training ground for future educational leadership positions.
Graduating subspecialty residents from this program work across Canada, and graduating fellows work in many countries around the world.
This accredited training is a two-year subspecialty program, divided into 26 four-week blocks. The majority of rotations are completed at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital.
highlight-card-coloursartboard-7.jpg
Subspecialty Residents have the opportunity to lead an established elective on Developmental Disabilities for the University of Alberta pre-clerkship medical students. This is an opportunity to continue to build the educational administrative leadership skills important for an academic practice: curriculum development, creating agendas and chairing meetings, giving and receiving feedback, and delivering high quality, engaging educational material.
...
A 6-week communication course designed to work on advanced communication skills. This course includes simulated patient encounters wherein the learner can practice discussing complex medical information with standardized patients/families. The heart of the course is developing the skills to manage the often complex reactions that patients/families can express during developmental pediatrics clinical care encounters. Key Resource -- Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking when the Stakes are High, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler.
 

Stollery Science Lab Distinguished Researcher Lonnie Zwaigenbaum

Stollery Science Lab Distinguished Researcher Lonnie Zwaigenbaum discusses his child health project. Zwaigenbaum's work is funded by the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation and its donors.

 

Skateboarding empowers Denise Bereber-Biziaev to reach new heights

Denise Bereber-Biziaev is a program administrator for medical education in the Department of Pediatrics. We talked about one of her passions outside of work - building a community of female skateboarders. Read Article

denise-3-1920x1080.jpg

Residency at a Glance

This residency program is for 2 years. Program length of training does not exceed the Royal College or College of Family Physicians of Canada standard.

 

This accredited training is a two-year subspecialty program, divided into 26 four-week blocks. The majority of rotations are completed at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital. There are 15 blocks in core Developmental Pediatrics, with a minimum of four blocks of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine and four blocks of Developmental/Behavioural services, divided between the first and second years. Core block opportunities exist in preschool and school-aged clinics, brain injury and orthopedic rehab, managing a diagnostic classroom, and running a longitudinal continuity clinic with direct supervision and mentoring. Opportunities to train through outreach clinics in remote locations occur throughout the program. Working closely with the various interprofessional clinicians during training ensures a rich understanding of medical teams and allows the trainee to deliver quality, team-based health care by the end of training.

In addition to the core rotations, one block each of Pediatric Neurology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Genetics is required. Five blocks of elective time are available and can be arranged outside of the University of Alberta. All rotations are designed to meet the individual educational needs and interests of our trainees, in keeping with the standards set by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. 

As many Developmental Pediatricians work in academic environments, teaching and research are an essential component of our training program. A minimum of three equivalent blocks of research are required, including a faculty-wide PGME Research Methodology course and optional course-work in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine. Funding for trainee research is readily available, as is support from local cutting-edge researchers. There is a genuine focus on developing teaching skills throughout training, including numerous presentation opportunities--from grand rounds to medical student clinical skills and community events.

A sample of the schedule/rotations for each year follows: (most rotations are at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital)

Year 1

8 weeks: Introduction to Rehabilitation and Developmental / Behavior

4 weeks: Preschool-aged Developmental / Behavior

4 weeks: School-aged Developmental / Behavior

8 weeks: Rehabilitation Junior

4 weeks: Research 

4 weeks: Genetics

4 weeks: Child Psychiatry

8 weeks: Core Selective

4 weeks: Elective

4 weeks: Vacation

Year 2

4 weeks: Preschool-aged Developmental / Behavior 

4 weeks: School-aged Developmental / Behavior

4 weeks: Rehabilitation Senior

4 weeks: Rehabilitation Senior - Brain Injury

8 weeks: Research

4 weeks: Pediatric Neurology 

8 weeks: Core Selective

12 weeks: Elective

4 weeks: Vacation


Teaching Hospitals

Much of the program is centered at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, a tertiary development and rehabilitation site. All required rotational sites are located within the greater Edmonton area.


Resident Testimonials

We asked our residents what they like about Edmonton, their highlights of the program, and one piece of advice for applicants about the interview process. Here is what a few of them had to say.

 

Sabrina Eliason

What do you like about Edmonton: Edmonton is a “Goldilocks” city– not too big, not too small and “just right” in many ways. You can easily forget you’re in a city when you’re in the River Valley, which provides a beautiful outdoor landscape to enjoy cross-country (and even some downhill) skiing, hiking, running, biking, golfing, nature watching and photography. There is a thriving and diverse restaurant and bakery industry in Edmonton, likely as a result of a nationally well-respected Culinary Arts program located here. As well, there are several regular outdoor and indoor farmers' markets across the city showcasing local produce and craftsmanship year-round. Edmonton is home to a professional symphony orchestra; several amateur and semi-professional orchestras, bands and choirs; and a passionate and thriving theatre community. Many international performance tours stop here on their way across North America and of course, we are home to a CFL, NHL and FC team.

What are the highlights of the program for you: Our program has a strong relationship with the University of Alberta General Pediatrics residency program. This provides many opportunities for Dev Peds trainees to develop their own teaching style throughout training. We also have a strong and balanced Division when it comes to teachers who can support learners in the areas of development and behaviour as well as neuromotor aspects of our field. Throughout my training, it was clear that learners at our site are a priority. I felt well supported and nurtured in my journey towards becoming a practicing physician.

What is one piece of advice that you want to share with applicants about the interview process: We want to meet you “for real” and we hope to provide a safe space that allows you to be yourself..

Dr. Sabrina Eliason (Victoria, British Columbia)

 

Alexandra Jackson

What do you like about Edmonton: Huge trail system in the river valley for running, biking, cross country skiing. Edmonton has great museums and a theatre scene, but has the vibe of a smaller town. It's also known as the most liberal hub in Alberta!

What are the highlights of the program for you: Excellent clinical educators and varied training across physiatry and developmental/behavioural pediatrics. A wide variety of research opportunities with internationally recognized researchers.

What is one piece of advice that you want to share with applicants about the interview process: Dev peds programs all want you, so be clear on what YOU want from a program.

Dr. Alexandra Jackman (Sioux Lookout, Ontario)

 

peds-dev-testimonial.jpg

 

What do you like about Edmonton: I was not expecting to love the city that much! There are plenty of parks and trails to walk, run, and bike. The weather in the summer is amazing; it is sunny and comfortable. Winter is cold, but really not that bad! There are a lot of good restaurants and great independent coffee shops. Farmers' markets are amazing, the city has nice sports facilities and there is a good public transportation system with the LRT that takes you to the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital and the university.  As a bonus... the Rocky Mountains are not too far with lots of great weekend getaway opportunities! Edmonton is definitely worthy to be discovered!

What are the highlights of the program for you: The heart of the program is at the Glenrose, where there is a strong history of developmental pediatrics, both in rehabilitation and in development. There are great clinicians in all disciplines that are accessible and enthusiastic to share their knowledge and experiences with residents in a truly multidisciplinary setting. There are many educational opportunities, with more journal clubs and rounds that you can possibly attend! The program is flexible and is tailored for the needs and interests of learners as there are so many learning opportunities. There is also a lot of learning opportunity as there are bridges with other specialties and many learning experiences for residents at U of A.

What is one piece of advice that you want to share with applicants about the interview process: Give yourself a chance to discover the different programs instead of stopping at preconceived ideas, then be yourself and aim for the best fit!

Dr. Fanny Lacelle-Webster (Sherbrooke, Québec)

 

Susan Bobbitt

What do you like about Edmonton: Edmonton is a really cool city. There are great restaurants, independent coffee shops, and lots of festivals going on throughout the year.

What are the highlights of the program for you: Developmental Peds is the best. Enthusiastic and caring staff members and support staff!

What is one piece of advice that you want to share with applicants about the interview process: Be yourself!

Dr. Susan Bobbitt (Weyburn, Saskatchewan)