Sociology

Post Doctoral Students & Visiting Professors

 

Seyedeh Behnaz Hosseini

VisitingScholar

ho4@ualberta.ca

Behnaz completed her doctoral research with a focus on Yārsān, a religious minority in Iran and Tran-nationalism in Sweden at the Institute of Oriental Studies in University of Vienna. Her research interests include religious minorities in Iran and Iraq, forced migration and integration. During her research she has been involved in a project about” Trafficking and slavery under ISIS: Trauma and rehabilitation of female survivors”. Currently she is a visiting scholar in the Department of Sociology in the University of Alberta working with prof. Stephen Kent, where she is working on a research project about Iranian religious minorities and doing research field work on the Kurdish communities in Alberta.

Richard Mailey

Post-Doctoral Fellow

mailey@ualberta.ca

Richard joined the U of A from the University of Luxembourg, where his Ph.D. in law (2017) was nominated as the law school’s thesis of the year. At the U of A, Richard will be working with Professor George Pavlich as part of the latter’s CRC project. In this regard, Richard will bring a constitutional perspective to Professor Pavlich’s CRC team by conducting research on the role that liberal conceptions of constitutional personhood play in concealing the often substantial, state-inflicted harms that stem from the mere fact of criminalization (as distinct from practices of imprisonment, for example). By contrast, Richard’s previous work - both his published articles and his doctoral thesis - have focused on constitutional law’s role in addressing the deep moral and political disagreements that are characteristic of contemporary democratic life, and that expose an often debilitating tension between democratic constitutionalism’s key functions: functions that can be captured under the headings of (individual) protection and (communal) reflection. Following on from this aspect of his work, Richard is also currently working on an article analysing the democratically problematic role that bouts of “institutional heroism” tend to play in the initiation of “constitutional moments,” i.e. moments of dramatic constitutional change.

 

 Holly Pelvin

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow

pelvin@ualberta.ca

Holly recently completed her PhD at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, entitled “Doing uncertain time: Understanding the experience of punishment in pre-trial custody” was supervised by Rosemary Gartner. It is based on data she collected at four maximum security institutions in Ontario, including 120 interviews with male and female prisoners, and 40 staff. It is the first systematic investigation of the experience of remand or pre-trial custody in Canada. Holly's next research project seeks to build on her interests in punishment, criminal justice institutions, intersectionality, the state, and qualitative methods.  She is currently a SSHRC-Postdoctoral Fellow here at the University of Alberta. Her postdoctoral research will examine Indigenous prisoners’ experience of pre-trial custody in Alberta, and if and how the legacy of colonialism and failed state policies may influence this experience.

 

 

Rafico Ruiz

SSHRC Banting Post-Doctoral Fellow

rruiz@ualberta.ca

Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. Heholds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.

 

      

Julia Smith

julia1@ualberta.ca

Banting Postdoctoral Fellow

Honorary Grant Notley Memorial Postdoctoral Fellow

Julia Smith is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow and Honorary Grant Notley Memorial Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. She has an interdisciplinary Ph.D. from the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies at Trent University and an M.A. and B.A. Hons. in History from Simon Fraser University. Her research examines the political economy of labour relations in Canada and the history and politics of women’s labour activism. She has published articles on feminist union organizing, labour relations in the child care sector, and the work experiences and labour militancy of flight attendants. Her current research projects include a study of efforts to establish unions for bank workers in Canada and an analysis of the different politics, strategies, and experiences of women who attempted to advance gender equality through and within the Canadian labour movement.




Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. Heholds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.
Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. Heholds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.