Sociology

Post Doctoral Students & Visiting Professors

 

 Holly Pelvin

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow

pelvin@ualberta.ca

Holly recently completed her PhD at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, entitled “Doing uncertain time: Understanding the experience of punishment in pre-trial custody” was supervised by Rosemary Gartner. It is based on data she collected at four maximum security institutions in Ontario, including 120 interviews with male and female prisoners, and 40 staff. It is the first systematic investigation of the experience of remand or pre-trial custody in Canada. Holly's next research project seeks to build on her interests in punishment, criminal justice institutions, intersectionality, the state, and qualitative methods.  She is currently a SSHRC-Postdoctoral Fellow here at the University of Alberta. Her postdoctoral research will examine Indigenous prisoners’ experience of pre-trial custody in Alberta, and if and how the legacy of colonialism and failed state policies may influence this experience.

 

 

Rafico Ruiz

SSHRC Banting Post-Doctoral Fellow

rruiz@ualberta.ca

Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.

 

Erwin Selimos

Post-Doctoral Fellow

selimos@ualberta.ca 

Erwin's research interests span childhood and youth studies and the sociology of migration. To date, his research has focused on questions of immigrant and refugee inclusion, the settlement and social inclusion experiences of newcomer youth, and youth-led social activism. Through his research activities, he tries as much as possible to collaborate with community stakeholders to ensure that his research is responsive to community needs and address locally-relevant issues. He is also very interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning, specifically how it applies to enhancing student learning in the social sciences. This is why he is excited to be working with Dr. Michelle Maroto and Dr. Gillian Stevens in the Department of Sociology on the development of a Certificate in Applied Social Science Research.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Laura Sikstrom

Killam Postdoctoral Fellow

lsikstro@ualberta.ca

Laura Sikstrom is a medical anthropologist and Killam Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Alberta working with Prof. Amy Kaler.  Her current research project investigates how children manage the life-course transition into adolescence while on ART in Malawi. This project will provide important data about the challenges of adherence and disclosure, as well as the realities of living with HIV as a chronic condition. Her research has immediate application in Malawi where improving treatment access and treatment outcomes for children and youth remains a global health priority.

Laura was awarded her PhD from the University of Toronto in 2015 for her dissertation titled: “He is almost a normal child: An ethnography of Malawi’s national pediatric HIV treatment program.” This dissertation was nominated for both the CAGS/UMI and CGS/Proquest Distinguished Dissertation Award by the University of Toronto. Laura’s dissertation investigates Malawi’s first antiretroviral therapy (ART) program for HIV-positive children and analyses the divergences between the policy as written in the global health policy making sphere and the everyday practices of health care workers, theorize their causes, and analyze their impact on HIV-positive children and their families. Laura found that health policy makers’ highly optimistic vision for the benefits of ART contrasted significantly with how caregivers experienced an HIV infected child’s treatment trajectory on ART, which was punctuated by chronic food shortages, treatment disruptions, the death of their parents and seasonal rural-rural migration as their caregivers searched for work. The challenges faced by caregivers in her research highlight the importance of ethnographic, culturally-embedded research as distinct from epidemiological research which focuses on biological markers and outcomes. 

Robin Willey

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow

willey@ualberta.ca

Robin Willey, PhD, is a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta and a future assistant professor of sociology at Concordia University of Edmonton (CUE). His research has generally focused on Evangelical Christianity in Canada and new religious movements. While he has previously published articles on the difficulties of conducting qualitative research in church communities, social theories of religion, and the courtship practices of Evangelical young adults, his most recent research looks to investigate the changing theo-political orientations of Canadian Evangelicals. Robin is completing his postdoctoral research under the supervision of Amy Kaler (Sociology), and with co-investigator John Parkins (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology). This focus on theo-politics has continued into this collaborative postdoctoral work, which investigates the complex motivations of Christian humanitarian aid workers in faith-based non-governmental organizations.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.
Rafico Ruiz is a SSHRC Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta. In the winter of 2018, he will be the Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies and the History & Theory of Architecture from McGill University. He studies the relationships between mediation and social space, particularly in the Arctic and Subarctic; the cultural geographies of natural resource engagements; and the philosophical and political stakes of infrastructural and ecological systems. His work appears in a number of journals and edited collections, including the International Journal of Communication, the Journal of Northern StudiesContinuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, and Communication +1. His work has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smallwood Foundation, Media@McGill, the McCord Museum and Archives, and the Harvard Medical School, amongst others.