Speech and Hearing Month #SpeechAndHearingMonth

To celebrate #SpeechAndHearingMonth, we asked students, staff and faculty, what speech-language pathology means to them and why they chose to pursue the profession.


Jana Reiger, Professor of Communication Sciences Disorders

“There is nothing like being able to help people connect with others, whether that's through restoring the ability to speak or the ability to swallow.” - Communication sciences and disorders professor Jana Rieger.

jana-rieger.png


Youran Lin, MSc - PhD Speech-Language Pathology Student

As a child, Youran was inspired by the story of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan, and is now pursuing an MScSLP and a PhD to help people achieve better communication.  

youran-lin.png


Cathryn Beck, MSc Speech-language Pathology Student

For MScSLP student Cathryn, the field of communication sciences and disorders is about empowering people to understand others and be understood — to have their messages heard.

cathryn-beck.png


Allison, MSc Speech-language Pathology Student

Future SLP practitioners like Allison know that improving communication ability lets us engage with others – and with our fullest lives.

alison-no-last-name-provided.png


Rebbeca Wiltzen, MSc Speech-language Pathology Student

Rebecca wanted to pursue a MScSLP because she was inspired by how great it would be to give people the power to communicate again.

rebecca-wiltzen.png


Jaylyn Loewen, MSc Speech-langauge Pathology Student

The chance to be part of a rewarding field that has measurable, significant, positive impacts on families, communities and the world is one of the reasons Jaylyn chose the MScSLP program.

jaylyn-loewen.png


Andrea MacLeod, Professor and Chair of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Professor Andrea MacLeod’s bilingual background inspired her fascination with language and communities. The multidisciplinary aspect of her communication sciences research keeps her excited and challenged.

andrea-macleod.png


Katherine Gerke, MSc Speech-language Pathology Student

Helping people with the thing that really makes humans special – being able to communicate their thoughts – is why Katherine is studying to become a speech-language pathologist.

katherine-gerke.png


Jenny, MSc Speech-language Pathology Student

A love of helping people and a fascination with language – especially bilingualism – inspired Jenny to pursue an MScSLP. Now she’s dedicated to helping others tackle their communication challenges.

jenny-no-last-name-provided.png


Esther Kim, Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders

When her childhood friend’s father suffered a stroke, associate professor Esther Kim saw how quickly our ability to communicate can be taken away. Now she supports people with aphasia and lives for the rewarding, breakthrough moments in an SLP’s career.

esther-kim.png