Cancer Sciences Specialization

The Cancer Sciences program offers laboratory-based training where both basic and translational medical research training is provided. Our program offers diverse research opportunities in molecular & cellular biology of cancer, clinical & translational oncology, novel therapeutics & diagnostics, and drug & biomarker discovery.

This specialization offers both thesis based Master of Science (MSc) and Doctoral (PhD) degrees.


Program Requirements:

On average, this program takes 2-3 years to complete and requires the following:

  • 3 approved graduate level courses (9 units)
  • 8 hours of academic integrity & ethics training
  • 8 hours of professional development training and an Individual Development Plan
  • Regular attendance at weekly Oncology 660/661 seminars
  • Annual supervisory committee meetings
  • Successful defense of MSc. thesis

On average, this program takes 4-6 years to complete and requires the following:

  • 4 approved graduate level courses (12 units)
  • 8 hours of academic integrity & ethics training
  • 8 hours of professional development training and an Individual Development Plan
  • Regular attendance at weekly Oncology 660/661 seminars
  • Presentation of one formal seminar every year
  • Annual supervisory committee meetings
  • Completion of PhD. candidacy exam
  • Successful defense of PhD. thesis

Departmental policies and procedures, on topics such as PhD candidacy exams, required courses, selecting Chairs for exams, and more can be found in our Oncology Graduate Student Handbook.

For information about general FGSR rules and regulations, such as thesis formatting, examining committee or supervisory committee composition, please refer to the FGSR Manual.

 

Principal Investigators & Supervisors

Not all of our staff supervise graduate students. Potential graduate students should contact investigators who's research interests align with their own and who state their willingness to supervise graduate students.

Dr. Kristi Baker

kbaker2@ualberta.ca 

 

Anti-tumor immunity; genetic instability; colorectal cancer

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Dr. Vickie Baracos

vbaracos@ualberta.ca

 

Muscle atrophy in cancer associated cachexia

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Dr. Gordon Chan

 

gkc@ualberta.ca

 

Mitotic cell cycle checkpoint and cancer

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Dr. YangXin Fu

yangxin@ualberta.ca

 

Signaling pathways and gene regulation in ovarian cancer and therapeutics

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Dr. Armin Gamper

 

gamper@ualberta.ca

 DNA damage response: radiation biology

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Dr. Spencer Gibson

sgibson2@ualberta.ca

Understanding the cell survival and cell death signaling in the lymphatic system and leukemias

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Dr. Roseline Godbout

rgodbout@ualberta.ca

 

Cancer as a developmental disease; retinoblastoma; brain tumors

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Dr. Michael Hendzel

mhendzel@ualberta.ca

 

Nuclear components; DNA damage response; chromatin-based epigenetic mechanisms

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Dr. Ismail Ismail

 

iismail@ualberta.ca

 

Targeting the DNA damage response in B cell malignancies

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Dr. John Lewis

jdlewis@ualberta.ca

 

Translational prostate cancer research; nanoparticles, novel therapeutics, in vivo imaging

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Dr. Wilson Roa

wroa@ualberta.ca

 

Nono-carrier platforms for therapeutic applications; image guided radiotherapy

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Dr. Michael Sawyer

msawyer@ualberta.ca

 

Cell biology, cell signaling and cancer, drug transporters

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Dr. Ralf Schirrmacher

schirrma@ualberta.ca

 

Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, development of PET imaging agents for neuro- and cancer imaging, medicinal chemistry and drug development

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Dr. Alan Underhill

underhil@ualberta.ca

 

Transcription factors in melanoma; gene regulation & epigenetics

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Dr. Frank Wuest

wuest@ualberta.ca

 

Probe development for molecular imaging of cancer

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