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Scot H. Simpson, BSP, PharmD, MSc

Professor and Associate Dean, Research & Graduate Studies

Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

About Me

I received my BSP from the University of Saskatchewan and completed a hospital pharmacy residency at the Regina General Hospital.  After working as a hospital pharmacist for a few years, I returned to school and completed a PharmD (University of Toronto) and MSc (University of Alberta).  I joined the Faculty in 2004 and am currently a Professor in the Pharmacy Practice Division.


Research

My research can be categorized into two major areas.

Health Outcomes Research

I am interested in understanding the effects of medications used to treat people with type 2 diabetes.  My work in this area follows three lines of inquiry:

  1. Is there an association between sulfonylurea use and risk of adverse cardiovascular events?
  2. Does aspirin dose moderate the effect of aspirin in people with type 2 diabetes?
  3. How does medication adherence affect the association between medications and outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes?

I have used a number of research methods in the fields of pharmacoepidemiology and systematic reviews to examine these questions.

Health Services Research

I am interested in understanding the effects of pharmacist intervention in the management of people with type 2 diabetes.


Selected Publications
  • Simpson SH, Lee J, Choi S, Vandermeer B, Abdelmoneim AS, Featherstone TR. Mortality risk varies amongst sulfonylureas: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology 2015;3:43-51.
  • Simpson SH, Abdelmoneim AS, Omran D, Featherstone TR. Prevalence of high on-treatment platelet reactivity in diabetic patients treated with higher versus lower doses of aspirin: a systematic review. Am J Med 2014;127:95.e1-95.e9.
  • Abdelmoneim AS, Eurich DT, Gamble JM, Johnson JA, Seubert JM, Qiu W, Simpson SH. Risk of acute coronary events associated with glyburide compared to gliclazide use in patients with type 2 diabetes: a nested case-control study. Diab Obesity & Metab 2014;16:22-9.
  • Eurich DT, Simpson SH, Senthilselvan A, Asche CV, Sandhu-Minhas JK, McAlister FA. Comparative safety and effectiveness of sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective population based cohort study. Brit Med J 2013;346:f2267.
  • Ladhani NN, Majumdar SR, Johnson JA, Tsuyuki RT, Lewanczuk RZ, Spooner R, Simpson SH. Adding pharmacists to primary care teams reduces predicted long-term risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without established cardiovascular disease: results from a randomized trial. Diab Med 2012;29:1433-9.
  • Abdelmoneim AS, Hasenbank SE, Seubert JM, Brocks DR, Light PE, Simpson SH. Variations in tissue selectivity amongst insulin secretagogues: a systematic review. Diab Obesity & Metab 2012;14:130-8.
  • Simpson SH, Gamble JM, Mereu L, Chambers T. Effect of aspirin dose on mortality and cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: a meta-analysis. J Gen Intern Med 2011;26:1336-44.
  • Simpson SH, Majumdar SR, Tsuyuki RT, Lewanczuk RZ, Spooner R, Johnson JA. Effect of adding pharmacists to primary care teams on blood pressure control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN97121854). Diabetes Care 2011;34:20-6.
  • Simpson SH, Eurich DT, Majumdar SR, Padwal R, Tsuyuki RT, Varney J, Johnson JA. A meta-analysis of the association between drug therapy adherence and mortality. Brit Med J 2006;333:15-8.
  • Simpson SH, Majumdar SR, Tsuyuki RT, Eurich DT, Johnson JA. The dose-response relationship between sulfonylureas and mortality in type 2 diabetes: a population-based cohort study. Can Med Assoc J 2006;174:169-74.


Teaching

Pharmacy 392 (Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacy Practice Research)

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate pharmacy students to the basic principles of pharmacoepidemiology and health services research.  Upon completion of the course, students should be able to recognize key elements of these study designs and critically analyze information from these types of studies.